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Full text of "Announcements"

A 

C 
T 

S 



SSOCIATION OF 

HICAGO 

HEOLOGICAL 

CHOOLS 



Catholic Theological Union 
Chicago Theological Seminary 

GaRRETT-Ev ANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

McCormick Theological Seminary 

Me ad ville /Lombard Theological School 

Mundelein Seminary 

North Park Theological Seminary 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1995-1996 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Association of Chicago Theological Schools 1 

Basic Information 1 

The Member Seminaries 2 

Common Council 8 

Faculty Area Groups 8 
Subclusters and Cooperative Activities 1 2 

Northside Chicago Theological Institute 12 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools 12 

World Mission Institute 1 3 

ACTS Doctor of Ministry in Preaching 13 

ACTS Travel Study Opportunities 13 

Joint Hispanic Ministries Program 1 5 

Hyde Park Joint African- American Ministries Program 1 5 

ACTS Urban Clinical Pastoral Education Program 16 

The Center for Religion and the News Media 1 6 

Chicago Center for Global Ministries 16 

The Ethics Center at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 17 

Non-Credit Language Courses 17 
Cooperating Institutions 1 8 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 1 8 

Centro para Desarrollo Comunitario y Liderato 1 8 

Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 1 9 

Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies 19 

Women's Place Resource Center 20 
Library Resources 21 
1995 Summer Programs 23 
Academic Calendars 27 
Information about Course Listings 33 
Course Descriptions 37 

Biblical Studies 

Historical Studies 

Theological Studies 

Ethical Studies 

Religion and Society Studies 

World Mission Studies 

History of Religions 

Ministry Studies 
Special Areas of Interest Within Courses of Study 1 00 

African-American Studies, Asian Studies, Cross-Cultural Studies, Hispanic 

Studies, Judaic Studies, Urban and Public Policy Studies, Women's Studies, 

Chicago Center for Global Ministries 
ACTS Personnel 105 

Faculty and Administrative Officers; Librarians 
Appendix: Evening/Weekend and Intensive Courses 125 
Locations of ACTS Schools 132 

Catalog Editor: Jeannette F. Scholer 



rail 


Winter 


Spring 


37 


59 


80 


42 


63 


85 


44 


65 


86 


48 


69 


89 


49 


71 


91 


50 


71 


91 


51 


72 


92 


51 


73 


92 



Association 

OF 

Chicago Theological Schools 

BASIC INFORMATION 

The Association of Chicago Theological Schools, known as ACTS, was formed in 
1984 by twelve theological schools located in or near Chicago to provide means for coop- 
eration among its member institutions in the areas of student cross-registration, library 
access and acquisitions, interchange among faculty members in the various disciplines of 
theological education, and communications between the schools. Prior to 1984, these 
schools had had many years of successful ecumenical cooperation, primarily through the 
Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, the Chicago Theological Institute, and the Li- 
brary Council. In addition to ACTS, various agreements between two or more institutions 
provide subclustering for cooperation according to specific programs and/or geographical 
proximity (see pp. 12- 17). 

All of the schools in ACTS are accredited members of the Association of Theological 
Schools in the United States and Canada. Each is affiliated with or sponsored by a denomina- 
tion, a diocese, a religious organization or several religious orders. Each offers professional 
degree programs for ministry at the master's and doctoral levels, and most offer other aca- 
demic degrees as well. All offer some variety of continuing education for clergy and lay 
leaders, and conferences, lectures and other programs of interest to a wider public. 

Together, the schools within ACTS offer a rich network of resources for theological 
education, making it one of the outstanding centers of theological education in the world. 
Available to the approximately 3000 students currently enrolled at its member schools is a 
faculty of over 350, over 1000 courses offered annually, and library collections of over 1.6 
million volumes and nearly 5000 currently received periodical subscriptions. Several schools 
have well-stocked theological bookstores. Additionally, ACTS makes it possible for stu- 
dents and faculty to pursue their work, study and reflection in interaction with people from 
many different cultural and theological traditions. 

Students in ACTS schools also have access to other resources pertinent to theological 
education available through institutions related to ACTS (see pp. 1 8-20). Many also draw on 
the vast resources of other institutions of higher education and the numerous religious organi- 
zations and agencies in the Chicago area related to one or more of the institutions in ACTS. 

ACTS itself does not offer either courses or degrees. Application for enrollment is made to 
one of the member institutions. 

An essential tool for cross-registration purposes, this catalog also includes information 
about utilizing the many resources for theological education available to students enrolled 
in the member schools of ACTS. 

The current chairperson of ACTS is Neal F. Fisher of Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. H. Kris Ronnow of McCormick Theological Seminary is Treasurer. Inquiries 
regarding ACTS should be directed to President Neal Fisher, Garrett-Evangelical Theologi- 
cal Seminary, 2121 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60201-3298; Phone: 708-866-3900. 



THE MEMBER SEMINARIES 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 

A collaborative school serving thirty-three religious orders, founded to promote diverse 
theological and ministerial traditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Emphasis on 
preparation for ministry, hence flexible academic patterns augmented by strong field edu- 
cation programs. Other special features: D.Min. concentrations in Cross-Cultural Minis- 
tries, Liturgy or Spirituality; fully individualized research or general academic M.A.; M.Div. 
concentrations in Bible, Pastoral Theology, World Mission or Word and Worship; World 
Mission Program designed to prepare American and international students to minister in 
other cultures; studies in African American and Hispanic Ministry. Programs open to all 
serious students, men and women. 

President Norman Bevan, C.S.Sp. 

Vice President and Academic Dean TBA 

Vice President for Administration and Finance Sue Cossey 

Dean of Students and Community Services Virginia Piecuch 



CiTHOLie 



Director of D. Min. Program 
Director of M.Div. Program 
Director of MA. Program 
Director of MA. PS. Program 



THEOLOGIC\L UNION Director of Continuing Education 

Registrar 
5401 South Cornell Avenue 



Edward Foley, O.F.M.Cap. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. 

Keiren O'Kelly 

Gary Neville, O.Praem. 



Chicago. IL 60615-5698 

312-324-8000 

FAX 3 12-324-4360 



Degree Programs: 

MAPS. 
M.Div. 



M.A. in Theology 

D.Min. (5 years in ministry prerequisite) 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

An ecumenical Seminary related to the United Church of Christ. A style fostering rigorous 
theological inquiry and development of students' own intellectual and professional integrity 
in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. The basic professional degree program is the 
three-year Master of Divinity, but the Master of Arts in Religious Studies may be awarded at 
the end of the second year as a terminal master's degree. The post-M.Div. Doctor of Ministry 
is available full- or part-time for students with experience in ministry. Joint programs with 
pastoral care institutions and a dual degree program with the School of Social Service Admin- 
istration of the University of Chicago are available. The Ph.D. programs focus on Christian- 
Jewish Relations and Theology, Ethics and the Human Sciences. 



President 


Kenneth B. Smith 


Academic Dean 


William R. Myers 


Registrar and Director of Studies 


Cheryl W. Miller 


Dean of Student Life/Director of Field Education 


Richard D. Lewis 


Interim Director of Recruitment 


Carol Koskelowski 


Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 


Delois Shepard 


Interim Vice-President for Biisiness Affairs 


Woodrow Howard 


Degree Programs: 




M.A. in Religious Studies D.Min. 




M.Div. Ph.D. 




S.T.M. 






5757 South University Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60637-9990 

312-752-5757 
FAX 3 12-752-5925 



GARRETT-EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Garrett-Evangelical is a graduate divinity school of the United Methodist Church. While 
the majority of the faculty and the students is affiliated with the school's denominational 
heritage, the seminary is ecumenical in religious and educational approaches. The cur- 
ricula emphasize theory and practice; they include the institutional emphases on The Church 
and the Black Experience, Peace and Justice, and Women in Ministry. The basic programs 
lead to the Master of Divinity, Master of Christian Education or Master of Theological 
Studies degrees. The advanced professional program leads to the Doctor of Ministry de- 
gree, while the Joint Program with Northwestern University leads to the Doctor of Phi- 
losophy degree. 




2121 Sheridan Road 

Evanston,IL 60201-3298 

708-866-3900 

FAX 708-866-3957 



President 

Dean and Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Director of the Ph.D. Program 

Vice President for Administration 

Vice President for Development 

Registrar 

Director of Admissions 



Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 
MCE. 
M.T.S. 



Neal F. Fisher 

Rosemary S. Keller 

Jack L. Seymour 

Adolf M. Hansen 

David L. Heetland 

Margaret A. Magee 

Kelly Dahlman-Oeth 



Master's/M.S.J. (dual program with N.U.) 
Master's/M.S.W. (dual program with Loyola U.) 
D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 
Ph.D. (joint program with N.U.) 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 

Preparation for professional ministry in the church, advanced studies in ministry, aca- 
demic study of theology. The M.Div. curriculum features a strong accent upon study of the 
traditions of the church and a comprehensive field work program, with special emphasis 
on cross-cultural ministry and global awareness. Opportunities offered for specialization 
in Hispanic Ministries, Ministry and Social Work, and coordinated M.Div./Ph.D. (with 
the University of Chicago). 



President 

Dean 

Executive Vice President 

Vice President for Administration and Finance 



William E. Lesher 

Ralph W.Klein 

Sarah M. Stegemoeller 

Joseph L. Rodrick 



Deans of the Community Marillyn and Michael Schultz Rothermel 



Director of Recruitment and Admissions 
Director, Hispanic Ministries Program 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 

and Extension Education 
Director of M. A. Program 
Registrar 



Christopher E. Eldredge 

Jos6 David Rodriguez 

Wesley J. Fuerst 

Robert L. Conrad 

KurtK.Hendel 
Patricia Bartley 



Degree Programs: 

MA. 
M.Div. 



Th.M/Th.D. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



tfjfc 




1100 East 55th Street 

Chicago, IL 60615-5199 

312-753-0700 

FAX 3 12-753-0782 



Mccormick theological seminary 



McCormick is a theological center for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It also welcomes 
many students from outside this denomination. It focuses its resources on education for the 
ministry, emphasizing both pre-professional (M.A.T.S. and M.Div.) and professional (D.Min.) 
studies. Its programs in Hispanic Ministries, Korean-American Ministries, African-Ameri- 
can Ministries, Women's Studies and Urban Ministry, its dual competency programs in Social 
Work and other fields, and its emphasis on internationalization add to its other offerings. 
Students are encouraged to plan, with advice, their own courses of study. 

President 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Dean of the Faculty 
Dean of Masters Programs 

Associate Dean for Experiential Education 
Dean of Doctoral Programs 
Director, Korean-American Ministries Center 

Associate Director 
Director, Hispanic Ministries Program 
Director, African-American Ministries Program 
Director, Office of Student Affairs 
Recruitment and Admissions Officer 
Registrar 

Vice President for Finance and Operations 
Director for Funds Development 




5555 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637-1692 

312-947-6300 

FAX 3 12-947-0376 



Cynthia M. Campbell 
Heidi Hadsell 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. 

Deborah F. Mullen 

Thomas Hawkins 

Howard Kang 

Hearn Chun 

David Corte's-Fuentes 

TBA 

Mary Paik 

Dan Krebill 

Jane Brawley 

H. Kris Ronnow 

Bernard W. Nord 



Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 
M.Div/M.S.W. 



M.A. in Theological Studies 

DMin. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 



MEADVILLE / LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 

Meadville/Lombard is an independent theological school affiliated with the University of 
Chicago and with the Unitarian Universalist Association. The mission of the School includes 
empowerment of liberal religious congregations and voluntary associations through the prepa- 
ration of men and women for ministry, religious education and community outreach. Meadville/ 
Lombard's educational process includes teaching, research, critical reflection and institutional 
outreach and dialogue with persons of non-Christian faiths. The School offers the M.Div., 
D.Min. (in sequence) or the M.A. in Religious Education degrees and is accredited. 

Dean and Chief Executive Spencer Lavan 

Librarian Neil W. Gerdes 

Registrar/Director for Student and Academic Cecelia E. Smith 

Services/Financial A id Officer 

Dean of Students Michelle Bentley 

Business Manager Randall Vaughn 

Development Officer EliseCade 

Admissions Officer Lisa Smith 

Degree Programs: 

M.A. in Religious Education 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (in sequence) 




5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637-1602 

312-753-3195 

FAX 312-753-1323 



MUNDELEIN SEMINARY 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ST. MARY OF THE LAKE 



With roots in a charter granted over 140 years ago, Mundelein Seminary of the University 
of St. Mary of the Lake prepares candidates academically, formationally and spiritually for 
the Roman Catholic priesthood. As a canonically erected Pontifical Theological Faculty, 
Mundelein Seminary of the University of St. Mary of the Lake is empowered to confer the 
Bachelor, Licentiate and Doctoral degrees in Sacred Theology. While originally most of 
the students attending Mundelein Seminary came from the Archdiocese of Chicago, its 
alumni now include students from other dioceses in the State of Illinois and throughout 
the country. 



! IS3 



Rector 

Academic Dean 

Registrar 

Dean of Formation 

Director of Finance 



John F. Canary 

Martin A. Zielinski 

Celia Wilson 

Thomas E. Hickey 

John F. Lehocky 



1000 E. Maple 

Mundelein, IL 60060- 11 74 

708-566-6401 

FAX 708-566-7330 



Degree Programs: 
MDiv. 
S.T.B. 
S.T.L. 
D.Min. 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



North Park Theological Seminary, founded in 1891, is the graduate school of theology of 
the Evangelical Covenant Church. It is a professional school designed to educate people 
for ministry, whether as pastors, missionaries, church educators or trained laity. The semi- 
nary is a community of professors, students and staff, gathered not only for the purpose of 
theological study, but for worship, fellowship and the deepening of the spiritual life. The 
seminary also includes in its purposes the continuing education of ministers. It sees itself 
as a servant of the Church of Jesus Christ, and particularly, of the Evangelical Covenant 
Church. 



President 


David G. Horner 


Dean of the Seminary 


John S. Bray 


Associate Dean/Registrar 


Tom W.Collins 


Coordinator of Student Services and Admissions 


TBA 


Degree Programs: 




M. Div. M.Div./M.B.A. 




MACE. M.A.T.S./M.B.A. 




MATS. D.Min. 





<h 



NorthPark 
Theological Seminary 

3225 W. Foster Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60625-4895 

312-244-6210 

FAX 3 12-244-6244 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Northern Seminary, founded in 1913, is a graduate seminary committed to the education 
of men and women for leadership in the churches. Our evangelical heritage commits us to 
the Lordship of Jesus Christ and the authority of Scripture for informing mission and 
ministry in the world. It is a community of faith, theological inquiry, worship and service, 
preparing persons for ordained ministries, other leadership roles in the church, and relat- 
ing Christian faith to life and vocation. The Seminary is related to the American Baptist 
Churches, U.S.A., and welcomes students from all denominations and Christian tradi- 
tions. 

President 

Vice President for Academic Affairs and 

Dean of the Seminary 
Vice President for Business Administration 
^^— ^Sk Executive Vice President for 

m j | iM Institutional Advancement 

\ Wf^ Registrar and Director of Financial Aid 

M- tU Of th©m bQ PtiSt Director of Supervised Ministry 

Director of Doctoral Studies 
Director of Hispanic Studies 
Director of the Theodore W. Grow Center 

for the Renewal of the Churches 
Assistant to the Dean for Korean Studies 
Degree Programs: 
M.A. 
M.Div. 
D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



orthern baptist 
theological seminary 

660 East Butterfield Road 

Lombard, IL 60148-5698 

708-620-2101 (President's Office) 

708-620-2103 (Dean's Office) 

708-620-2105 (Registrar's Office) 

FAX 708-620-2 194 



Ian M. Chapman 
Douglas R. Sharp 

S.Josephine Chan 
Theodore Y. Rodgers IV 

Iris E. Sanchez 

William R. Nelson 

Robert G.Duffett 

Osvaldo L. Mottesi 

William P. Clemmons 

James J. Sok 



SEABURY-WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Seabury- Western Seminary, one of eleven accredited seminaries of the Episcopal Church, 
is a largely residential seminary committed to providing excellence in academic prepara- 
tion for congregational leadership. Worship, offered three times a day, is central to com- 
munity life. The student body reflects the breadth of Anglican tradition, drawing students 
from 25 or more states each year. Located just across the street from Garrett-Evangelical 
Seminary, the two schools have joined forces to form the United Library which provides an 
oustanding theological library of 287,000 volumes. Students studying at Seabury- Western 
experience the distinctive eclecticism that characterizes Anglicanism. 



Dean and President 
Associate Dean 

and Vice President for Academic Affairs 
Chief Financial Officer 
Director of Development 
Registrar 
Director of Seabury Institute 

Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 
M.T.S. 
D.Min. 



Mark S. Sisk 
Paula S. Datsko Barker 

David G. Glover 

Jane W. Strehlow 

Veronica R. Morrison 

ArlinJ.Rothauge 




2122 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, IL 60201-2938 

708-328-9300 

FAX 708-328-9624 



TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL 
OF TRINITY INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School is maintained by the Evangelical Free Church of 
America to educate men and women for a world-wide Christian ministry as pastors, mis- 
sionaries, teachers and lay-workers who are committed to God for a particular service for 
which they recognize a need for seminary studies. The Divinity School welcomes the 
opportunity of assisting students from all denominations and independent non-denomina- 
tional churches who are seeking preparation for fruitful Christian life and ministry. 
Chancellor (as of 9/1/95) Kenneth M. Meyer 

President (to be named II 1 /95) 

Executive Vice President of Operations Milo D. Lundell 

Senior Vice President of Education & Academic Dean W. Bingham Hunter 

Senior Vice President of Doctoral Programs/ Academic Planning Nigel M. de S. Cameron 
Senior Vice President of Enrollment Management John Gredy 

Senior Vice President of Student Life Melvin D. Svendsen 

Vice President of Institutional Advancement David Magnuson 

Vice President of Professional Doctoral Programs Warren S . Benson 

Associate Academic Dean Barry J. Beitzel 

Director of the Ph.D. Program in Theological Studies Douglas J. Moo 

Director of the Ph. D. Program in Intercultural Studies Paul G. Hiebert 

Director of Doctor of Education Perry G. Downs 

Director of Records Jeffrey J. Millenson 

Degree Programs: 

M.A. (eight areas) M.A.R. Ed.D. (4 years experience prerequisite) Ph.D. (in Intercultural Studies) 
M.Div. M.R.E. D.Min. (3 years experience prerequisite) Ph.D. (in Theological Studies) 

Th.M. 

A 2065 Half Day Road 

1 N T E KN AT I O N A L Deerfield, IL 60015-1283 
1 JKl IN 1 1 I II U N I V E K S IT Y 708-945-8800 

EVANGELICAL- DIVINITY- SCHOOL FAX 708-3 17-8141 



COMMON COUNCIL 

OF THE 

ASSOCIATION OF CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



Norman Bevan, C.S.Sp. 

Kenneth B. Smith 

Neal F. Fisher 

William E. Lesher 

Cynthia M. Campbell 

Spencer Lavan 

John F. Canary 

David G. Horner 

Ian M. Chapman 

Mark S. Sisk 

TBA 



Catholic Theological Union (CTU) 
Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS) 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (G-ETS) 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC) 
McCormick Theological Seminary (MTS) 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School (M/L) 
Mundelein Seminary (MS) 
North Park Theological Seminary (NPTS) 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary (NBTS) 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary (S-WTS) 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (TEDS) 



FACULTY AREA GROUPS 



(See final pages for biographical data.) 



OLD TESTAMENT 



Richard Averbeck (TEDS) 

Barry Beitzel (TEDS) 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) 

Phyllis Bird (G-ETS) 

Edward Campbell (MTS) 

Mary Deeley (S-WTS-Adj.) 

Wesley Fuerst (LSTC) 

YunChun Han (MTS-Adj.) 

Theodore Hiebert (MTS-Vis.) 

Fredrick Holmgren (NPTS) 

Leslie Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) 

David Howard, Jr. (TEDS) 

Ralph Klein (LSTC) 

Paul Koptak (NPTS) 

Andre LaCocque (CTS) 

Timothy Lenchak, S.V.D. (CTU-Adj.) 

Dennis Magary (TEDS) 

Helen Kenik Mainelli (NBTS) 

Claude Mariottini (NBTS) 

Walter Michel (LSTC) 

Raymond Ortlund, Jr. (TEDS) 

Chang Hwan Park (MTS-Adj.) 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) 

Wolfgang Roth (G-ETS) 

Herman Schaalmann (CTS- Adj.) 



Robert Schoenstene (MS) 
Willem VanGemeren (TEDS) 

NEW TESTAMENT 

Linda Belleville (NPTS) 

Barbara Bowe, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

Robert Brawley (MTS) 

Donald Carson (TEDS) 

Jungsik Cha (MTS-Adj.) 

Charles Cosgrove (NBTS) 

Mario DiCicco, O.F.M. (CTU-Adj.) 

Dorothy Folliard, O.P. (MS) 

Adolf Hansen (G-ETS) 

Murray Harris (TEDS) 

Estella Boggs Horning (NBTS-Affil.) 

W. Bingham Hunter (TEDS) 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) 

Edgar Krentz (LSTC) 

Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU-Adj.) 

Wilhelm Linss (LSTC-Emeritus) 

John Lodge (MS) 

James Mcllhone (MS) 

Margaret Mitchell (MTS) 

Douglas Moo (TEDS) 

Grant Osborne (TEDS) 

Carolyn Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 



Chang Hwan Park (MTS-Adj.) 
Eung-Chun Park (MTS-Adj.) 
Richard Pervo (S-WTS) 
Barbara Reid, O.P. (CTU) 
David Rhoads (LSTC) 
Barbara Rossing (LSTC) 
Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) 
Klyne Snodgrass (NPTS) 
Graydon Snyder (CTS) 
Richard Stegner (G-ETS) 
Sarah Tanzer (MTS) 
Osvaldo Vena (G-ETS) 
Herold Weiss (NBTS-Affil.) 

CHURCH HISTORY 

Philip Anderson (NPTS) 

Paula Datsko Barker (S-WTS) 

Dorothy Bass (CTS) 

John Bray (NPTS) 

David Daniels III (MTS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

John Charles Godbey (M/L) 

Stephen Graham (NPTS) 

Dennis Groh (G-ETS) 

Kurt Hendel (LSTC) 

Lawrence Hennessey (MS) 

Cynthia Jurisson (LSTC) 

Rosemary Keller (G-ETS) 

William Kuntze (CTS-Adj.) 

Jong Min Lee (MTS-Adj.) 

Kevin Madigan (CTU) 

Charles Meyer (MS-Emeritus) 

Larry Murphy (G-ETS) 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU-Adj.) 

Thomas Nettles (TEDS) 

Richard Pervo (S-WTS) 

Daniel Rodriguez-Diaz (MTS) 

Theodore Ross, S.J. (CTU-Adj.; MS-Adj.) 

Kenneth Sawyer (MTS) 

James Stein (G-ETS) 

John Woodbridge (TEDS) 

Martin Zielinski (MS) 

THEOLOGY 

Paula Datsko Barker (S-WTS) 
Robert Barron (MS) 
Stephen Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) 
Walter Brennan, O.S.M. (CTU-Adj.) 
Harold Brown (TEDS) 



Ralph Burhoe (M/L-Emeritus) 

Alfloyd Butler (NBTS) 

Sara Butler, M.S.B.T. (MS) 

Louis Cameli (MS) 

Nigel Cameron (TEDS) 

Cynthia Campbell (MTS) 

Anna Case-Winters (MTS) 

Andriy Freishyn- Chirovsky (CTU-Adj.) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

Ian Evison (M/L- Adj.) 

John Feinberg (TEDS) 

Paul Feinberg (TEDS) 

Bruce Fields (TEDS) 

Brian Fischer (MS) 

Neal Fisher (G-ETS) 

Dorothy Folliard, O.P. (MS) 

James Griffiss (S-WTS-Adj.) 

Wayne Grudem (TEDS) 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Philip Hefner (LSTC) 

Carl Henry (TEDS-Vis.) 

Theodore Jennings (CTS) 

Kenneth Kantzer (TEDS) 

Spencer Lavan (M/L) 

Leo Lefebure (MS) 

Perry LeFevre (CTS-Emeritus) 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU-Adj.) 

John McDonnell (MS) 

Charles Meyer (MS-Emeritus) 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

Thomas Parker (MTS) 

Albert Pero, Jr. (LSTC) 

Jamie T. Phelps, O.P. (CTU) 

Gene Reeves (M/L) 

Luis Rivera-Rodriguez (MTS) 

Jose David Rodriguez (LSTC) 

Rosemary Ruether (G-ETS) 

Herman Schaalmann (G-ETS-Adj.) 

Robert Schreiter, C.Pp.S. (CTU) 

Douglas Sharp (NBTS) 

Susan Thistlethwaite (CTS) 

Sara Vaux (G-ETS-Adj.) 

Dwight Vogel (G-ETS) 

Andrew Wallace (LSTC-Adj.) 

Bruce Ware (TEDS) 

C. John Weborg (NPTS) 

Vitor Westhelle (LSTC) 

James Will (G-ETS) 

Henry Young (G-ETS) 



ETHICS 

Patrick Boyle, S.J. (MS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) 

Toinette Eugene (G-ETS) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. (CTU) 

Heidi Hadsell (MTS) 

Carol Hepokoski (M/L- Adj.) 

Reinhard Hiitter (LSTC) 

John Kilner (TEDS) 

Jerome Listecki (MS) 

Lois Gehr Livezey (MTS) 

Donald Matthews (CTS) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) 

Timothy Sedgwick (S-WTS) 

Richard Tholin (G-ETS) 

Kenneth Vaux (G-ETS) 

Paul Wadell, C.P. (CTU) 

WORLD MISSION 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU/MTS) 
Richard Bliese (LSTC) 
Robert Coleman (TEDS) 
William Danker (LSTC-Emeritus) 
Eleanor Doidge (MTS; CTU- Adj.) 
Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) 
Paul Hiebert (TEDS) 
John Kaserow, M.M. (CTU) 
David Lindberg (LSTC-Emeritus) 
Lois McKinney (TEDS) 
Harold Netland (TEDS) 
John Nyquist (TEDS) 
Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M. (CTU) 
Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D. (CTU) 
James Scherer (LSTC-Emeritus) 
Roger Schroeder, S.V.D. (CTU-Adj.) 
Ruth Tucker (TEDS-Vis.) 
Harold Vogelaar (LSTC-Vis.) 
Wayne Weld (NPTS) 

MINISTRY: ITS NATURE AND 
PRACTICE 

Scott Alexander (M/L-Adj.) 
Helen Bishop (M/L-Adj.) 
Alva Caldwell (G-ETS) 
Richard Carlson (NPTS) 



Hearn Chun (MTS) 

William Clemmons (NBTS) 

Mary Lou Codman-Wilson (G-ETS-Adj.) 

Tom Collins (NPTS) 

David Cortes-Fuentes (MTS) 

Penelope Cukr (CTS-Adj.) 

Mary Jane Dahm (CTS-Adj.) 

John Dreibelbis (S-WTS) 

Robert Duffett (NBTS) 

W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) 

Mary Frohlich (CTU) 

Kendyl Gibbons (M/L-Adj.) 

Hugh Halverstadt (MTS) 

James Hargleroad (MTS-Adj.) 

Thomas Hawkins (MTS) 

Steven Janco (MS) 

Howard Kang (MTS) 

Deborah Kapp (MTS) 

Tae-Hyung Ko (MTS-Adj.) 

Jane Koonce (NPTS) 

Roy Larson (G-ETS-Adj.) 

Mary Ann McDermott (CTS-Adj.) 

Veronica Mendez, R.C.D. (MS) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Deborah Mullen (MTS) 

William Nelson (NBTS) 

Jerold Reed (NPTS) 

Kenneth Smith (CTS) 

John Tolley (M/L-Adj.) 

Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) 

Robert Turtle, Jr. (G-ETS) 

James Wall (G-ETS-Adj.) 

Douglas Wingeier (G-ETS) 

Richard Wojcik (MS-Emeritus) 

PASTORAL CARE 

Herbert Anderson (CTU) 
Homer Ashby, Jr. (MTS) 
Ruth Ann Bailey (NPTS-Adj.) 
Kathleen Billman (LSTC) 
George Cairns (CTS) 
Edward Cronin (MS) 
David Dillon (TEDS) 
Joseph Byung II Doh (MTS-Adj.) 
Ian Evison (M/L-Adj.) 
Geraldine Flynn (MS) 
Judith Golz (TEDS-Vis.) 
Warren Heard, Jr. (TEDS) 
Thomas Hickey (MS) 



10 



John Hinkle (G-ETS) 
David Hogue (G-ETS) 
Everett Jackson (NPTS) 
Emma Justes (NBTS) 
Spencer Lavan (M/L) 
David McKay (TEDS- Adj.) 
Bonnie Miller-McLemore (CTS) 
Robert Moore (CTS) 
Robert Myers (S-WTS-Adj.) 
Lallene Rector (G-ETS) 
Joan Scanlon, O.P. (CTU-Adj.) 
Daniel Schipani (NBTS-Affil.) 
Miriam Stark (TEDS) 
Sharon Thornton (CTS- Adj.) 
PaulWachdorf(MS) 
Bartholomew Winters (MS) 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

Richard Carlson (NPTS) 
John Dreibelbis (S-WTS) 
Richard Lewis (CTS) 
Howard Matson (TEDS) 
Veronica Mendez, R.C.D. (MS) 
Deborah Mullen (MTS) 
William Nelson (NBTS) 
Neil Shadle (M/L) 
John Szura, O.S.A. (CTU-Adj.) 
Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) 
Raymond Webb (MS) 

WORSHIP AND PREACHING 

Mark Bangert (LSTC) 
Michael Bullmore (TEDS) 
Ian Chapman (NBTS) 
Donald Chatfield (G-ETS) 
William Clemmons (NBTS) 
Ruth Duck (G-ETS) 
Robert Duffett (NBTS) 
Royce Eckhardt (NPTS-Adj.) 
Robert Finster (S-WTS) 
Brian Fischer (MS) 
Edward Foley, O.F.M.Cap. (CTU) 
Richard Fragomeni (CTU) 
Mark Francis, C.S.V. (CTU) 
Kenneth Hindman (MTS) 
Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 
Richard Jensen (LSTC-Vis.) 
Dai Kyun Kim (MTS-Adj.) 
Paul Koptak (NPTS) 



David Larsen (TEDS) 
Paul Manz (LSTC-Emeritus) 
Morris Niedenthal (LSTC) 
Carol Noren (NPTS) 
Theodore Olsen (TEDS) 
Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) 
Arturo Perez (CTU-Adj.) 
Jane Rzepka (M/L-Adj.) 
Kenneth Sawyer (M/L-Adj.) 
Michael Schaab (CTU-Adj.) 
Daniel Siwek (MS) 
James Speer (TEDS) 
Dwight Vogel (G-ETS) 
Don Wardlaw (MTS) 
C. John Weborg (NPTS) 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Frances Anderson (NPTS) 
Warren Benson (TEDS) 
Colleen Birchett (MTS-Adj.) 
Kathy Brawley (NPTS-Adj.) 
Elizabeth Caldwell (MTS) 
William Clemmons (NBTS) 
Robert Conrad (LSTC) 
Perry Downs (TEDS) 
Richard Dunn (TEDS) 
M. Susan Harlow (M/L) 
Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) 
Judith Mannheim (M/L) 
William Myers (CTS) 
Jane Marie Osterholt (CTU-Adj.) 
Daniel S. Schipani (MTS-Adj.) 
Charles Sell (TEDS) 
Mark Senter (TEDS) 
Jack Seymour (G-ETS) 
Linda Vogel (G-ETS) 
Richard Walsh (CTU-Adj.) 
Ted Ward (TEDS) 
Charles Wysong (NPTS-Adj.) 

CANON LAW 

Carol Amadio (S-WTS-Adj.) 

John Dolciamore (MS) 

Gary Neville, O.Praem. (CTU) 



SUBCLUSTERS AND COOPERATIVE ACTIVITIES 



NORTHSIDE CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE (NCTI) 

The Northside Chicago Theological Institute (NCTI) was organized in 1971 for edu- 
cational and ecumenical purposes by five theological schools: Garrett-Evangelical Theo- 
logical Seminary, North Park Theological Seminary, Seabury- Western Theological Semi- 
nary, Mundelein Seminary and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

The schools are located on the north side of the greater Chicago area, with one in 
Chicago, two on contiguous campuses in Evanston adjacent to Northwestern University, 
one in Deerfield and one in Mundelein. 

The activites of the NCTI are under the direction of a Board of Directors whose offic- 
ers are elected annually. From its beginning the NCTI has emphasized the importance of 
student representation on its boards and committees. The NCTI sponsors three events 
annually: two academic courses and one religious observance. 

A Fall Seminar on the "Church and Its Mission" is a three-hour course exploring the 
views of several major Christian communions on this theme. Further information can be 
obtained from Sister Sara Butler, M.S.B.T., Coordinator (MS); Phone: 708-566-6401. 

In January each member school of NCTI observes the Week of Prayer for Christian 
Unity through activities appropriate to its own tradition. Exchange of pulpit speakers is 
one practice that has proven to be an enrichment of the schools at this time. 

The Spring Seminar offered annually is a three-hour course which has addressed 
various theological themes in a variety of forms. In recent years the seminar has focused 
on the diversity in which Christians of many traditions understand "Life in the Spirit." In 
its present format the seminar includes two overnight, intensive retreat experiences on the 
campus of Mundelein Seminary. Registration for the seminar is limited in number. A 
minimal fee is requested of student participants. Further information regarding the "Life 
in the Spirit" Seminar can be obtained from Professor John Weborg, Coordinator (NPTS); 
Phone: 3 12-478-2696 or from Sister Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M., NCTI Executive Sec- 
retary (MS); Phone: 708-879-1296. 

THE HYDE PARK CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS (CLUSTER) 

The five ACTS schools located in Hyde Park (Catholic Theological Union, Chicago 
Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological 
Seminary and Meadville/Lombard Theological School) and the Divinity School of the 
University of Chicago identify themselves as The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools 
(Cluster). The Cluster seeks ways to deepen academic cooperation and sharing beyond 
those made possible by the ACTS structure. 

The purposes of the Cluster are to: (1) promote academic cooperation among the 
schools in Hyde Park; (2) foster dialogue and scholarship among its faculties through 
support of discipline groups and interdisciplinary colloquies; (3) develop support for aca- 
demic programs through cooperative student services, recruitment and language programs; 
and (4) aid in communication and planning among the member institutions. 

12 



The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools is administered by a committee con- 
sisting of the chief academic officers of the six schools. For 1995-96 the Chair of this 
committee is William R. Myers of Chicago Theological Seminary; Phone: 312-752-5757, 
Ext. 224. The chief executive officers of the cooperating institutions serve as an advisory 
board to the committee, especially in those areas related to institutional planning. 

WORLD MISSION INSTITUTE (WMI) 

The World Mission Institute (WMI) is an annual conference, usually held in April, spon- 
sored since 1 970 by member schools of ACTS, along with several other educational and 
mission organizations. Each year outstanding international speakers and resource persons 
deal with a significant aspect of Christian world mission. The 1995 WMI focused on the 
theme: "Reconciliation as a Missiological Challenge." The 1996 WMI is scheduled for April 
25-27, 1996, with the theme: "Globalization and the Mission of the Church Catholic." 

All students and faculty of ACTS schools are invited to participate in the WMI with- 
out registration charges. Inquiries regarding WMI should be addressed to: WMI Coordi- 
nator, c/o Chicago Center for Global Ministries, 5401 South Cornell Avenue, Chicago, IL 
60615; Phone: 312-363-1342. 

ACTS DOCTOR OF MINISTRY IN PREACHING 

A Doctor of Ministry in Preaching is offered by a sub-cluster of six ACTS schools as 
an accepted program of the Association. The six schools are: Chicago Theological Semi- 
nary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary, North 
Park Theological Seminary, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary and Seabury- Western 
Theological Seminary. The program is ecumenical in nature and cross-disciplinary in its 
design. The curriculum includes three summer residencies of three weeks each in Chi- 
cago, plus two Preaching Ministry Projects and a final thesis. Each student's program is 
tailored to his or her needs in consultation with a supervisor and peers in the residency, as 
well as with a parish advisory committee. Interested persons should inquire through Don 
M. Wardlaw, Director, or Marylen Marty-Gentile, Program Administrator; ACTS D.Min. 
in Preaching Program, 5555 S. Woodlawn, Chicago, IL 60637: Phone:312-947-6270. 

ACTS TRA VEL STUDY OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities to travel and study in a variety of places outside Chicago for course 
credit as offered by several ACTS schools are listed below by geographical area. Students 
from CTU, LSTC and MTS can contact the office of the Chicago Center for Global Minis- 
tries (see p. 16) for full details about programs and funding. 

Europe. Professor K. James Stein of G-ETS will lead a study tour, "The Reformation 
and the Holocaust," June 15-29, 1995, traveling to Reformation and Holocaust sites in 
Germany, Switzerland, Czechoslavakia and Poland. For more information, contact James 
Stein, G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3952. 

Germany. The Collegium Oecumenicum in northern Munich, Germany, offers LSTC 
students the chance to live and study for up to a year among a community of fifty students 
from Germany and other parts of the world. Students do their academic work at the Univer- 
sity of Munich. Students may register for the winter semester (November to February) and/or 
the summer semester (May to August). Students from other ACTS schools who are interested 
in this program should contact Richard Bliese at the CCGM office; Phone: 312-363-1342. 

13 



Ghana. The "Summer in Africa" cross-cultural immersion course is being offered by 
the Tamale Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies (TICCS) from mid- June to mid- August as 
an "approved summer ministry" of CTU. Participants will be involved for nine weeks in 
language learning, culture-learning and ministry learning. They will live in an African 
village, learn basic texts in the language, interact with the people, and experience the 
cultural roots of local church ministries. For more information, contact the director of the 
Cross-Cultural Ministries Department, CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

Greece/Turkey. CTU offers a study tour "Churches of Paul and Revelation" to sites 
of early Christian communities in Greece and Asia Minor June 10-27, 1997. Sites to be 
visited include Athens, Corinth, Phillippi, Antioch, Tarsus, Ephesus, Cappadocia, Istanbul 
and more. In addition to archaeology and early church history, biblical study will focus on 
St. Paul, Acts of the Apostles and the Apocalypse. For more information contact the 
Director of Israel Programs, CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

Israel. CTU offers a program in Israel August 1-22, 1996, as an opportunity to reflect 
prayerfully on the Scriptures in the Holy Land. Half of each day is given to orientation to 
biblical sites and the other half for visiting biblical sites for prayer and reflection. For 
applications, contact the Director of Israel Programs, CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

CTU will offer a second Israel program from May 22-June 1 1, 1997 as a three-week 
intensive with guided exploration of biblical and historical sites. A prerequisite for the 
seminar is B 475, History and Archaeology of Israel. Participants receive three quarter 
credits for the trip. Application forms are available from the Director of Israel Programs, 
CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

Japan. M/L can arrange special exchanges to Tsakuba University in Japan. Knowl- 
edge of Japanese is required. For more information, contact Dean Spencer Lavan; Phone: 
312-753-3195. 

Kenya. CTU and the Maryknoll Community offer an opportunity to participate in the 
Maryknoll Institute of African Studies (MIAS) in Nairobi, Kenya, for three three-week 
sessions during the summer of 1996. The primary goal of the MIAS is to teach in a 
systematic way contemporary culture and religion of East Africa so that students appropri- 
ate an African perspective on these realities through lectures, reading, field research, theo- 
logical reflection and a research/integration paper. For information, contact MIAS, P.O. 
Box 24592, Nairobi, Kenya. 

Korea. G-ETS offers a travel seminar to Korea in January, 1996. For more informa- 
tion, contact Toinette Eugene, G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3973, or Patty Baker, G-ETS; Phone: 
708-866-3903. 

Middle East. CTU is offering an extended program of study and guided exploration 
of biblical sites August 22-November 17, 1996. Coursework concentrates on the history 
and archaeology of Israel in a variety of Old and New Testament traditions. A ten-day Re- 
entry Program conducted as CTU concludes the on-site program. Participants earn twelve 
graduate hours for the travel program and three graduate hours for the re-entry program. 
Deadline for applications is January 15, 1996. For applications, contact the Director of 
Israel Programs, CTU; Phone: 312-324-8000. 

G-ETS offers a travel seminar to Israel and Palestine in January, 1996. Students will 
meet with Christians, Jews and Muslims of various political outlooks. For more information, 

14 



contact Rosemary Ruether, G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3953, or Patty Baker, G-ETS; Phone: 
708-866-3903. 

Russia. G-ETS offers a travel seminar to Russia January 8-25, 1996. Students will 
interact with Korean Methodist congregations in Moscow and with the Department of 
Education of the Russian Orthodox Church. For more information, contact James Will, 
G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3963, or Patty Baker, G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3903. 

South Africa. In conjunction with an African Methodist Episcopal congregation G-ETS 
offers a travel seminar to South Africa in January, 1996. For more information, contact Larry 
Murphy, G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3977, or Patty Baker, G-ETS; Phone: 708-866-3903. 

Sweden. LSTC has an agreement for students to study at the University of Uppsala on 
a full-time basis for a year; courses are offered in English. Students from other ACTS 
schools who are interested in this program should contact Richard Bliese at the CCGM 
office; Phone: 312-363-1342. 

JOINT HISPANIC MINISTRIES PROGRAM 

The Hispanic Ministries Program, offered jointly by McCormick Theological Semi- 
nary and the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, offers a concentration within the 
course of study of the regular M.Div. and M.A.T.S. degrees. The purpose of the program 
is to prepare Hispanics and other bilingual persons to serve effectively in Hispanic com- 
munities. The program offers courses in all fields of the seminary curriculum and in the 
practice of ministry in local Hispanic settings. 

In addition to their own faculty, MTS and LSTC invite outstanding Hispanic theolo- 
gians and ministerial practitioners to their campuses to expand the resources available and 
to reinforce the identity of the Hispanic Ministries Program. 

HYDE PARK JOINT AFRICAN-AMERICAN MINISTRIES PROGRAM 

The Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools' Joint African American Ministries 
Program is a cooperative effort on the part of six schools to prepare men and women for 
effective ministries in the African-American community. The Program was established in 
1992 in response to the critical need for Black Church leadership to serve the practical and 
spiritual needs of its people. Through a series of courses, field experiences and formation 
activities, students can enhance their preparation for ministry with a special focus on 
ministry in the African-American community. 

There are eight core courses in the program: Biblical Interpretation from an Afro- 
Centric Perspective; The History of the Black Church in North America; Black Theology; 
Ethical Implications of Ministry in the Black Church; Preaching in the Black Church; 
Pastoral Care in the Black Church; Black Spirituality; Community Leadership. The Field 
Education component provides placement in church or community agencies in the Black 
context. Workshops, lectures, fellowship occasions and a mentoring program comprise 
the formation element of the program. 

All students who are enrolled in the Hyde Park Cluster of Theological Schools are 
eligible to participate in the full program. The core courses are open to all ACTS students. 
Hyde Park students may, with permission of the academic dean of their school, utilize an 
African-American resource course to meet required course distribution. 

For more information, contact the Coordinator, Michelle Bentley (M/L); Phone: 312- 
753-3198. 

15 



ACTS URBAN CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Six schools (Chicago Theological Seminary, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Semi- 
nary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary, 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School and The Divinity School of The University of 
Chicago) and one hospital system (Advocate Health Care) sponsor this Clinical Pastoral 
Education Program in Public Ministry, both in the summer and in an extended, year-long 
format. Accredited by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, it offers a non- 
traditional CPE experience with focus on urban and public ministry. It brings together the 
CPE methodology of integration of personal and professional attributes with the practice 
of ministry in urban agencies, parishes and community organizations. The goals of the 
program are: 

• To experience ministry in a cross-cultural setting. 

• To learn how to enter into an on-going community organization, agency or parish. 

• To develop the ability to do social analysis. 

• To discern and maintain a balance between ministry to individuals and ministry to structures. 

• To develop an awareness of the important linkages and connections necessary in public ministry 

settings. 

• To develop an awareness of different approaches to public ministry and to define an approach 

which is consistent with one's own theological tradition. 

• To gain a sense of hope regarding involvement in the public sector. 

• To develop an ability to be reflective on one's own learning process and to include others in that 

process. 

The summer basic program runs for eleven weeks, full-time (mid-June through late 
August), and the extended unit, thirty weeks, fifteen hours per week, in coordination with 
the seminary calendars. Tuition is $585. The application procedure is to complete the 
standard ACPE application and submit it by December 15 (for the summer) or April 15 
(for the fall), have an admission interview with a CPE supervisor, and meet with the 
Director of the Program, There is a $25 application fee applicable to tuition, if accepted. 
For further information contact the Director of the ACTS Urban CPE Program, 5555 S. 
Woodlawn, Chicago, IL 60637; Phone: 312-947-6300. 

THE CENTER FOR RELIGION AND THE NEWS MEDIA 

The Center for Religion and the News Media is a collaborative project sponsored by 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and the Medill School of Journalism at North- 
western University. 

The Center was established in 1994 to enhance the news media's coverage of religion 
and the religious dimension of other issues. It trains journalists specializing in the coverageof 
religion and religious leaders interested in acquiring media skills. A dual degree program 
enables students to tap into the resources of both the participating schools. 

Inquiries about the Center should be directed to Roy Larson, G-ETS; Phone: 708- 
866-3960. 

CHICAGO CENTER FOR GLOBAL MINISTRIES (CCGM) 

To meet the growing challenges to preparation for ministry posed by globalization 
trends today, Catholic Theological Union, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, and 

16 



McCormick Theological Seminary established in 1993 the Chicago Center for Global 
Ministries. The purpose of the Center is both to coordinate more effectively current re- 
sources and to build upon those resources to meet the globalization challenge for ministry, 
especially in regard to cross-cultural ministries, world mission, interreligious dialogue, 
urban ministries and issues of justice, peace and the integrity of creation. 

The Center serves as a focus point for these areas of ministry by coordinating course 
offerings, offering a forum for concerned faculty to come together around these issues, as 
well as providing a locus for new research efforts in these areas of globalization. At a time 
when theological education is becoming more international and multicultural, and the 
world itself manifests simultaneously a new concern for particularity and greater possibili- 
ties for communication, the work of the Chicago Center for Global Ministries embraces 
these paradoxes and complexities as the location for training ministers for the twenty-first 
century. 

For additional information, contact the Director, Stephen Bevans, or the Associate 
Director, Richard Bliese, at the CCGM office at CTU; Phone: 312-363-1342. 

THE CENTER FOR ETHICS AT GARRETT-EVANGEUCAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The Ethics Center offers seminars, lectures and conferences on a rich array of public 
concerns such as "Dying Well in the Late Twentieth Century," "Religion and War," "Chil- 
dren in the City"and "The Future of Health Care." The Center, based in G-ETS, is con- 
nected with the graduate faculty of Northwestern University and enjoys the resources of 
Northwestern's professional schools as well as those of the churches and synagogues of 
Chicago and the Evanston area. The Center focuses on two areas of ethical exploration 
during each year, although working groups and publications will continue from one cycle 
to another. 

ACTS faculty and students are invited to attend lectures of interest or to become 
involved as scholar-participants in any of the cycles. For more information, contact Ken- 
neth Vaux, Director; Phone: 708-866-3887. 

NON-CREDIT LANGUAGE COURSES 

Non-credit courses in French, German, Greek, Latin and Spanish are available to 
graduate students in the Chicago area through a program administered by the Hyde Park 
Cluster of Theological Schools. The aim of the courses is to assist students to achieve 
facility in reading the respective languages and to prepare students for the graduate lan- 
guage exams required by certain degree programs. Moderate fees are charged. For further 
information, contact Celia Brickman; Phone: 312-643-5806. 



17 



COOPERATING INSTITUTIONS 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE (CASIRAS) 

This is an independent corporation, consisting of scientists and theologians. Although 
it is national in scope, it concentrates a number of its activities, as well as its administra- 
tive office, in Hyde Park and has developed an effective working relationship with neigh- 
boring theological schools. The founder is Ralph Wendell Burhoe (Emeritus, M/L), re- 
cipient of the 1980 Templeton Award. CASIRAS' activities are chiefly in cooperation with 
the Chicago Center for Religion and Science (CCRS) at LSTC, of which it is a co-founder. 
For information about CCRS, see the current catalog of LSTC. 

CASIRAS and CCRS seek to achieve a greater integration between the scientific and 
religious models or images concerning the nature, destiny and moral behavior of humans. 
Dimensions of CASIRAS' work include seminars, courses, conferences, symposia and 
guided research as well as publishing Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science. In coop- 
eration with LSTC and M/L, CASIRAS offers the advanced Seminar in Religion and 
Science (T-672) each year, usually in the spring quarter. 

For further information contact Professor Philip Hefner (LSTC); Phone: 312-753-0670. 

CENTRO PARA DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO Y LIDERATO (CDCL) 

Center for Community and Leadership Development 

3439 West North Avenue Executive Director: Hector Quintana 

Chicago, IL 60647 

312-489-4533 

Centro Para Desarrollo Comunitario y Liderato is a community-based organization 
established in 1981 to serve the predominantly Latino community of the near northwest 
side of Chicago. Centro seeks to: (1) develop programs by creating networks of grassroots 
organizations and churches (from all the denominations present in the area) to meet the 
needs of the community's poor and minority population; (2) do grassroots issue organizing 
to promote neighborhood stability and empowerment; (3) provide training to both commu- 
nity lay leaders and pastors on institutional development and strategies for resolving com- 
munity issues; and, (4) provide consulting and technical assistance to grassroots organiza- 
tions and churches on effective methodologies for leadership, institutional and community 
development. 

CDCL seeks to address the root causes of poverty in the Latino community of Chicago 
by raising the awareness level of community residents and assisting them in self-develop- 
ment, leadership skills and becoming self-sufficient. These leaders, in turn, become com- 
munity assets in developing strategies to resolve or alleviate social problems. CDCL's 
work is accomplished in relationship with well-established social, educational and reli- 
gious institutions. It serves as a center for the empowerment of leaders and the self- 
development and training of Latino pastors and residents of Chicago. 

18 



SEMINARY CONSORTIUM FOR URBAN PASTORAL EDUCA TION (SCUPE) 

200 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 502 President: David J. Frenchak 

Chicago, IL 60601-5909 
312-726-1200; FAX 312-726-0425 

The Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education provides specific programs of 
study in the area of urban pastoral education. SCUPE works cooperatively with Chicago area 
churches and community agencies and is committed to the development of competent and 
creative leaders who both understand and can work with the realities of power, poverty and 
pluralism found in cities. 

For students interested in exploring urban ministry as a vocation, SCUPE provides a one- 
year intensive program of urban pastoral education that is designed to fit into the core curricu- 
lum of a Master of Divinity degree. Through an integrated educational structure of curricu- 
lum, church/agency internship and small group process, SCUPE students live, work and 
study in the city, developing both professional and personal skills. Representative courses 
include "Urban Systems," "The Black Church in an Urban Culture" and "Urban Principalities 
and the Spirit of the City." 

Students not able to take the full-year program, but wanting part of their theological 
education to be focused on the context of the city, may register for one quarter of urban 
ministry courses or may enroll in particular courses throughout the academic year. Fall quar- 
ter courses focus on understanding the city and the church in the city. Winter quarter courses 
focus on developing skills for ministry in the city. Spring quarter courses are designed to 
address the future development of the church and the city through strategies and planning for 
ministry in the city. Courses offered by SCUPE during the 1994-95 academic year are listed 
with a SCUPE prefix in the course descriptions in this catalog under the appropriate head- 
ings. 

Students from ACTS schools that are members of SCUPE (G-ETS, NBTS and NPTS) 
receive both academic and field education credit for the SCUPE program. Students from 
other ACTS schools are responsible to arrange details of accreditation and tuition payment 
through their seminary dean. 

Every two years SCUPE hosts the Congress on Urban Ministry, which brings together 
persons involved in urban ministry throughout the nation and the world. The next Congress 
will be held in 1996. 

For further information about SCUPE, contact Carol Ann McGibbon, Executive Vice 
President. 

SPERTUS INSTITUTE OF JEWISH STUDIES 

618 S. Michigan Avenue President: Howard A. Sulkin 

Chicago, IL 60605 Vice-President for Academic Affairs: Byron L. Sherwin 

312-922-9012 

Spertus College, the academic division of Spertus Institute, offers graduate degrees 
(master and doctoral) in Jewish Studies and provides continuing adult education for the 
Chicago community at large. The College is the largest non-rabbinical training school for 
higher Jewish learning in the Midwest. Certain Spertus degrees may be earned through 
"Distance Learning." 

Founded in 1924, the Institute is comprised of Spertus College, the Asher Library and 

19 



Spertus Museum. The Asher Library and Spertus Museum hold the major collections of 
Jewish art, ritual objects, books, journals, music videos and archives in the Chicago area. 
Use of these resources is available to faculty and students of ACTS schools. 

An agreement between Spertus College and the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 
was signed in 1978 to provide for library access and cross-registration of students. Various 
courses have been taught on ACTS campuses as well. Spertus courses are open for cross- 
registration for students of all ACTS schools, but special considerations may apply. Be- 
cause procedures for cross-registration, acceptance of courses for credit and modes of pay- 
ment may differ in individual schools, students are responsible to determine what particu- 
lars apply at their own schools. 

For further information about all Spertus courses and programs, contact the Office of 
Student Services; Phone: 312-322-1769. 

WOMEN'S PLACE RESOURCE CENTER (WPRC) 

29 South LaSalle Street, Suite #1020 Coordinator: Jody Gardner 

Chicago, IL 60603 

312-553-9008 

Women's Place Resource Center is a place where women come together for learning, 
support and networking. Women from diverse religious traditions, life experiences and 
commitments in the world are welcomed. The women of WPRC are deeply committed to 
both local and global issues that affect women. 

WPRC co-sponsors the Women, Ministry and the City Summer Program (see p. 26), 
as well as seminars and programs related to its concerns throughout the year. Programs 
can be arranged for seminaries, schools and churches to focus on women's spirituality, 
battered women, women's health or other issues. 

Women's Place has a growing resource library of materials on feminist theology, scrip- 
tural studies, spirituality, inclusive language liturgies, violence against women and eco- 
nomic issues. Several women from WPRC are working on a research project on the social- 
ization, sexuality and spirituality of girls 9-15 years old, with the aim of developing teach- 
ing materials. In its Loop location, Women's Place is developing new programs to meet 
the unique spiritual needs of working women. 



20 



LIBRARY RESOURCES 

THE LIBRARY COUNCIL OF ACTS 

The ACTS Library Council members' combined library collections comprise over 1.6 
million volumes of books, about 5,000 currently received periodicals, electronic media 
equipment and modern language laboratory facilities. 

Circulation Policies. Students and faculty of the Library Council member schools 
have borrowing privileges at all of the libraries, but must abide by the circulation policies 
of each library. These users may also request at their local library material from other 
member libraries which will be sent through the courier service of the Council. The 
courier's schedule is three times a week during Fall, Winter and Spring quarters and twice 
a week during quarter breaks and most of the summer. Most libraries levy fines for over- 
due, damaged and lost library materials. 

In addition to the resources of their own libraries, all libraries in the Council have 
access to OCLC (The Online Library Computer Center), a national and international bib- 
liographic database through which access to the collections of thousands of libraries and 
millions of volumes is made available. In addition, the United Library (G-ETS and S- 
WTS) is part of the Northwestern University Library computerized system (NOTIS), and 
the Catholic Theological Union Library is part of IO (Illinet Online) which gives access to 
over eight hundred libraries in the state of Illinois. 

MISSION STA TEMENT 

The ACTS Library Council recognizes both its responsibility to share the richness of 
its combined theological resources and the benefits of networking in the face of financial 
limitations. Therefore, the Library Council commits itself to collaborative collection de- 
velopment and to cooperative organization of and access to resources for theological edu- 
cation. To achieve this mission: 

• The Library Council supports its member libraries in collecting resources to support 

constituent degree programs and scholarly research and to represent the religious tra- 
ditions of the member schools. 

• The Library Council by systematic planning identifies and coordinates the acquisition of 

resources in selecting religious traditions not represented by the member schools. 

• The Library Council seeks ways to provide access to those materials not collected by the 

member libraries. 

• The Library Council provides bibliographic access and document delivery of materials 

among member libraries. 

GOALS 

In order to carry out its mission, the ACTS Library Council has the following goals: 

• To provide ready access for the academic communities of the member institutions to 

information about the resources for the theological education and research available in 
the ACTS libraries. 

• To provide access to these resources themselves through reciprocal borrowing agree- 

ments, inter-library borrowing and a courier service. 

• To insure the acquisition and maintenance of in-depth collections in the religious tradi- 

tions represented by the member institutions. 

• To prevent unintentional duplication of materials among member libraries. 

• To support programs for the conservation and preservation of ACTS library collections. 

21 



• To provide for a greater range of available resources through cooperative acquisition 

agreements. 

• To identify and maintain automated systems to support these programs for collection 

development and access. 

• To enable consultation among ACTS librarians and communication between the Library 

Council and the Common Council of ACTS. 

LIBRARIES OF THE ACTS LIBRARY COUNCIL 

In the following listing the library location is given only in the instance of a joint 
library. Hours are given for regular academic sessions. 



Catholic Theological Union 

The Library 

3 1 2-753-5321 ; FAX 3 1 2-324-4360 


Monday-Wednesday 
Thursday 


8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m 
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m 


Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 




8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m 
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m 
1:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m 



Chicago Theological Seminary 

Hammond Library 

312-752-5757, Ext.225; FAX 312-752-5725 



Monday-Thursday 


8:30 a.m. 


- 8 


30 p.m 


Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


- 4 


30 p.m 


Saturday 


10:00 a.m. 


- 1 


00 P.M 


Sunday 


7:00 p.m. 


- 10 


00 p.m 



Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

The United Library 

Both Campuses 

708-866-3909, -3899; FAX 708-866-3957 



Monday-Thursday 


8:30 a.m. 


- 10 


00 P.M 


Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


- 5 


00 P.M 


Saturday 


12:00 m. 


- 5 


00 P.M 


Sunday 


7:00 p.m. 


- 10 


00 P.M 



Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Society of Jesus: Chicago Province 

Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick (JKM) Library 
LSTC Campus 

3 12-753-0739; FAX 3 12-753-0737 
Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
Friday-Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Sunday 6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. 



Meadville/Lombard Theological Library 

The Wiggin Memorial Library 
312-753-3196; FAX 312-753-1323 
Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Mundelein Seminary 

The Feehan Memorial Library 
708-566-6401, Ext.50; FAX 708-566-5229 
Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

North Park Theological Seminary 

North Park Consolidated Library 
3 12-244-6239, -5580; FAX 3 12-244-4891 
Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 
Friday 7:45 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1:00 p.m. - 12:00 p.m. 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Brimson Grow Library 
708-620-2104; FAX 708-620-2170 
Monday 11:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Tuesday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
Friday-Saturday 11:00a.m. - 5:00p.m. 

Sunday 5:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

Rolfing Memorial Library 
708-3 1 7-8 1 50; FAX 708-3 17-8141 
Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Wheaton College Libraries 

Billy Graham Center Library 
708-752-5525, -5194; FAX 708-752-5916 
Buswell Memorial Library 
708-752-5101, -5102; FAX 708-752-5855 
Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. - 9:45 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 



22 



1995 SUMMER PROGRAMS 

A sizeable number of courses are available in summer programs offered by various ACTS 
institutions. The cross-registration agreements explained on page 36 apply only to the regular 
academic year. Students are encouraged to do summer study at schools other than their 
institutions of matriculation, but each student must register personally with the offering school 
or joint program for summer courses and make payment directly to that institution. 

To aid students in locating such summer study opportunities in the Chicago area, these 
programs are outlined below, giving only number, title, professor for each course, along with 
information as available about meeting times. (Please refer to pages 33-36 for interpretation 
of course numbers. 

CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION- SUMMER INSTITUTE 1995 

CTU's Summer Institute consists of short intensive courses for those interested in 
earning credit for degrees or continuing education. Students may earn 1.5 graduate cred- 
its per course or one Continuing Education Unit per course. For further information, 
contact Keiren O'Kelly, Director of Continuing Education; Phone: 312-753-5316. 

Session 1 — June 12-16 

B 330S A People Without Understanding: Isaiah of Jerusalem (Lenchak) 9-1 1:30 
MW454S Theology of Lay Preaching (Fragomeni) 9-11:30 

Discipleship and Community in the Fourth Gospel (Reid) 1 :30-4 

Spirituality Beyond Mid-Life (Frohlich) 1:30-4 

i^BFypa^BCrBCfGcd (Linnan) 6:30-9 p.m. 

Strategies for Re-Animating Parish (Brennan) 6:30-9 p.m. 

June 19-23 

Comfort My People: Second Isaiah (Lenchak) 9-1 1:30 

Lay Preaching Practicum (Fragomeni) 9-1 1:30 

Managing Transition: Parish and Personal (Hiesberger) WThF 1-5:30 

Liturgy and Social Justice (Pawlikowski) 1:30-4 

Theology: Language of Faith (Linnan) 6:30-9 p.m. 

Ethical Issues of Living Longer (Nairn) 6:30-9 p.m. 

Session 3 — June 26-30 

B 581 S "Male and Female God Made Them" (Bergant) 9-1 1 :30 

MW473S Lay Presiding: The Art of Leading Prayer (Hughes) 9-1 1 :30 

C 455S Caminemos con Jesus: La teologia hispana en los estados unidos (Goizueta) 1:30-4 

E 55 IB Spirituality and Social Justice (Pawlikowski) 1:30-4 

B 455S Jesus' Images of God (Senior) 6:30-9 p.m. 

E 486S Marriage as Sacramental Life (Wadell) 6:30-9 p.m. 

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN URBAN AND PUBLIC MINISTRY 

Six ACTS schools and Advocate Health Care sponsor the ACTS Urban Clinical Pas- 
toral Education Program, an eleven-week summer program in clinical pastoral education, 
offering a non-traditional CPE experience with focus on urban and public ministry. Ap- 
plications must be completed by the preceding December 15. For more information, con- 
tact the Director of the ACTS Urban CPE Program, c/o MTS; Phone: 312-947-6300. Re- 
fer also to the description of this cooperative program on page 16 of this catalog. 

23 



B440S 


S406S 


D325A 


I446S 


ssion 2 — 


B331S 


MW455S 


M410S 


E551A 


D325B 


E443S 



1995 CHICAGO SEMINARY SUMMER SESSION 

The 1995 Chicago Seminary Summer Session is a joint project of five seminaries: Chicago 
Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Semi- 
nary, Meadville/Lombard Theological School and Wartburg Theological Seminary, Dubuque, Iowa. 

The program includes three weeks of one-week intensives. The courses are suitable for a broad 
range of purposes: Continuing Education Units (CEUs), Master of Arts, Master of Divinity, Doctor 
of Ministry and other graduate programs. All courses are worth one full course credit or three CEUs. 
Most courses have a limit of twenty students, while the preaching courses have a limit of fifteen. A 
number of courses have specific prerequisites, and certain categories of students will be given pref- 
erence for some courses, e.g., D.Min. in Preaching students for the electives in preaching. All 
courses meet 8:30-4:30 (with some adjustments during Week Three), including chapel and lunch. 

Deborah Smith Douglas, poet, theologian and laypreacher, will serve as the 1995 Sum- 
mer Session lecturer. The lectures, entitled "Sounding Heaven and Earth: Explorations in 
Preaching and Poetry," will be held from 1 1:30-2:30 on July 12, 13 and 14 in the Chapel/ 
Auditorium of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. There will be a $5.00 per lecture 
fee at the door for those not enrolled in the Summer Session. 

Information about the program can be obtained by speaking with Robert L. Conrad from 
the Office of Extension Education, LSTC; Phone: 312-753-0723. 

Week One Courses — June 19-23 

SSM 526 Methodology in Pastoral Theology (Billman/Conrad) 

SSM 493 Power and Partnership in the Parish (Everist) 

SSB 520 Use of the Bible in Ethical Decision-Making (Fuerst) 

SSH 465 Women in the History of the Christian Church (Jurisson) 

SSM 527 Family Process and Natural Systems (Foster) 

SSM 470 Base Christian Community/House Church (Cairns) 

SSB 427 God's Word Through Isaiah (Michel) 

Week Two Courses — June 26-30 

SSM 522 Personality Theories and Therapies I (Benson) 

SSM 460 Youth Ministry in the United States (Myers) 

SSM 412 Ministry In and With Small Membership Churches (Ailes) 

SSM 321 Introduction to Pastoral Care (Ashby) 

SSM 491 Multiple Staff Ministry (Herr) 

SSB 469 The Gospel of Matthew for Pastoral Ministry (Powell) 

SST 475 Theologies of the Liberal Churches (Godbey) 

SST 433 Creation Theology and the Doing of Ethics (Hadsell) 

Week Three Courses — July 4-8 

SST 466 Islam: Faith, Tradition and Dialogue (Lavan) 

SSM 440 Preaching to Renew the Church (Chapman) 

SSM 445 Women and Preaching (Noren) 

SSM 446 Preaching the Gospel of Matthew (Rhoads) 

SSM 442 Poetry and the Preacher (Hunter) 

SSM 448 Re-Imagining the Sermon II: The Image as Central Hermeneutic (Roloff) 

SSM 449 Anti-Judaism and Preaching the Gospels (Salmon) 

SSM 450 The Language of Faith in the Modern World (Taylor) 

SSM 467 Preaching as a Communicative Art (Ward) 



24 



GARRETT-EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY- SUMMER SCHOOL 1995 

The Summer School of G-ETS offers a variety of courses for academic credit or continu- 
ing education credit. Within the structure of two terms, courses are offered as one-week or 
two-week intensives. For further information, call Judy Russell or Doris Rudy; Phone: 708- 
866-3942 or 708-866-3936. 

Travel/Study (June 15-29) 

elective The Reformation and the Holocaust (Stein/Mayer) 

First Term (June 19-30) 

40-674 United Methodist Studies: Wesley/ 19th Century (Chilcote) June 19-30, including 

Saturday 
22-501 Church and Society: Basic Analysis (Tholin/Scott) June 19-30 
34/33-507 Leadership in the Local Church (Wingeier) June 19-30 
21-500 Contexts and Methodologies for Contemporary Theology (Young) June 19-30 
31-513 Creating Worship in Community (Duck/Caldwell) June 19-30 
33-506 Theological Education in the Parish (Seymour /Crain) June 19-30 
22-507 Health and Life, Suffering and Death (K. Vaux) June 19-30 
elective Who Do Film Makers Say That I Am? Christology and Contemporary Cinema (Groh/ 

Mahan) June 19-23 
elective Theological Issues of Self and Spirituality for the Other-nurturing Woman: "You your 

best thing" (S. Vaux) June 19-23 
elective Women's Thinking and the Future Church (Allen) June 26-30 
elective Supervision for Ministry (Jennings) June 26-30 

Second Term (July 3-14) 

elective Church Music and the Bible (Saliers/D. Vogel/Spytek/Wallace) July 3-14 

40-673 United Methodist Studies-History, Doctrine and Polity: 20th Century (Keller /Troxell) 

July 3-14 
33-612 Strategies and Resources for Youth Ministry (Otto) July 3-14 
33-501 Teaching and Learning in the Church (L. Vogel) July 3-14 
31-501 Developing and Preaching the Sermon (Wallace) July 3-14 
12-501 New Testament: Matthew- Acts (Burton) July 3-14 

elective God Loves a Cheerful Giver: Christian Philanthropy and the Church (Heetland) July 3-14 
33-610 Children and Christian Faith (Olson) July 3-14 

elective Bridging the Gap between the Church and News Media (Mahan/ Lars on) July 3-7 
elective The 13th Generation on Campus and in Congregations (Philllips) July 3-7 
DMin Leadership in Ministry: Styles, Skills and Strategies (Wingeier) July 3-7 
DMin Stewardship as Practice of Justice and Peace (Will) July 3-7 

Cont.Ed. Good Mourning: Understanding the Process of Grief, Grief Counseling and Bereave- 
ment Ministry (Miller) July 10-11 
DMin The Church with a Human Face: Ecclesiology and Congregational Studies (Wingeier) 
July 10-14 

LSTC SUMMER GREEK PROGRAM 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago will offer intensive study of New Testament 

Greek in two three-week sequential courses: 

SB-307 Biblical Greek I (Holloway) July 17-August 4 M-F 8:30-11:30 
SB-308 Biblical Greek II (Holloway) August 7-25 M-F 8:30-11:30 

For further information, contact Patricia Bartley, Registrar; Phone: 312-753-0717. 



25 



TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL - SUMMER SCHOOL 

TEDS offers a wide variety of courses for academic credit, varying in quarter hours for 
each course. A selected list from the almost sixty courses offered is given below. For 
further information and a complete listing, contact Barry Beitzel; Phone: 708-317-8084. 

Session I — June 1 9- July 6 

NT746A Septuagint and the New Testament (Moo) June 19-22, July 3, 5, 6 MTWTh 8-12:15 
OT 503 A Elementary Hebrew (VanGemeren) MTWTh 1-5 
PC 621 A Marriage/Family Therapy (Heard) MTWTh 1-3:45 
ST 408 A Theological French I (Colman) MTWTh 9-12 
Note: Classes will not meet on July 4 in observance of Independence Day. 

Session II - July I0-July 27 

OT504A Elementary Hebrew II (VanGemeren) MTWTh 1-4:45 
H720A Senior Homiletics Lab (Olsen) TWTh 1-2 
ST409A Theological French II (Colman) MTWTh 9-11:45 
ST845A Modernity (Netland) MTWTh 1-3:30 
Session HI — August 7-26 

OT601A Hebrew Syntax (Magary) MTWTh 9-11:45 

PC 611 A Psychology and Theology (Heard) August 14-18 am and pm 

PC 675 A Psychopharmocology/ Counseling (Stark) August 21-25 am and pm 

Session IV — August 28-September 16 

ME630A World Religions (Netland) MTWTh 1-4:30 
NT 491 A Greek Review (Harris) MTWTh 8-12 
PR511A Apologetics (P. Feinberg) MTWTh 1-4:30 
OT602B Hebrew Exegesis (Magary) MTWTh 9-12 
Note: Classes will not meet on September 4 in observance of Labor Day. 

WOMEN, MINISTRY AND THE CITY 

A Summer Study Action Program for Women in Ministry — June 19- August 4 

Women, Ministry and the City is a unique summer internship experience for women 
to work with women in a variety of settings. The program offers a full-time experience of 
three components: placements in city ministries, either community organizations or par- 
ish settings; didactic input by women scholars and community activists; and group experi- 
ences for case processing, theological reflection and mutual support. The Program sets the 
framework for social analysis from the perspective of women from diverse cultural con- 
texts and provdes acquaintance with Chicago's neighborhoods and systems. During the 
seven-week program students spend at least twenty hours a week working in their church or 
agency placements. Additionally, paarticipants are involved for two days a week in group 
settings on women's issues, the church, community building, reflection and worship. 

The Program is sponsored by a Board of Directors, the Institute of Pastoral Studies of 
Loyola University of Chicago, Bethany Theological Seminary, Catholic Theological Union, 
Chicago Theological Seminary, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary and Women's Place Resource Center. 

Students register both at their school and with Women, Ministry and the City. The 
application deadline for 1995 is May 15. For information about the program for 1995 or 
for 1996, contact Peggy L.T. Garrison, 1585 Ellinwood #200, Des Plaines, IL 60016- 
4505; Phone: 708-824-3653. 

26 



ACADEMIC CALENDARS 



All ACTS schools have three quarters of instruction each academic year, although they 
do not use a common calendar. Catholic Theological Union, Chicago Theological Seminary, 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick Theological Seminary, Meadville/ 
Lombard Theological School, North Park Theological Seminary and Northern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary use calendars which closely parallel the calendar of the University of Chi- 
cago. Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and Seabury- Western Theological Semi- 
nary follow a coordinated calendar which closely parallels that of Northwestern University. 

The following calendars give the essential dates of each school with reference to reg- 
istration, beginning and ending dates of each quarter and any dates on which classes will 
not be held. 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 

1995-96 



1996-97 





FALL 




September 6 


D. Min. Core Colloquium I Begins September 4 


September 21-22 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 26-27 


September 25 


Classes Begin 


September 30 


September 29 


Last Day to Add Courses 


October 4 


November 14-15 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 18-20 


November 23-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 28-December 1 


December 8 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 13 


January 2 


Classes Begin 


January 6 


January 6 


Last Day to Add Courses 


January 10 


February 20-2 1 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 24-26 


March 15 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 21 


March 25 


Classes Begin 


April 1 


March 29 


Last Day to Add Courses 


April 5 


April 5-8 


Easter Recess 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


May 14-15 


Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 


May 19-21 


May 30 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 6 



27 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

1995-96 



1996-97 





FALL 




September 25 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 23 


October 2 


Classes Begin 


September 30 


October 13 


Last Day to Add/Drop Courses 


October 1 1 


November 13-17 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 18-22 


November 23-24 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 28-29 


December 15 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 13 


January 2 


Classes Begin 


January 6 


January 13 


Last Day to Add/Drop Courses 


January 17 


January 15 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 


January 20 


February 19-23 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 24-28 


March 15 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 21 


March 25 


Classes Begin 


March 3 1 


April 4 


Last Day to Add/Drop Courses 


April 1 1 


April 5 


Good Friday Recess 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


May 13-17 


Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 


May 19-23 


May 27 


Memorial Day 


May 26 


May 31 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 6 



GARRETT-EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

1995-96 



1996-97 





FALL 




September 20-21 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 25-26 


September 25 


Classes Begin 


September 30 


September 29 


Last Day to Add a Class 


October 4 


November 14-15 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 19-20 


November 20-24 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 25-29 


December 8 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 13 


January 8 


Classes Begin 


January 6 


January 9 


Last Day to Add a Class for 2-week classes January 7 


January 3 1 


Last Day to Add a Class for 8-week classes January 29 


March 5-6 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


March 4-5 


March 22 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 27 


April 1 


Classes Begin 


March 3 1 


April 4-5 


Good Friday Recess 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


April 8 


Last Day to Add a Class 


April 4 


May 27 


Memorial Day 


May 26 


June 6 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 5 



28 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 

1995-96 



1996-97 





FALL 




September 5 


Fall Pre-Term Begins 


September 3 


September 27-28 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 25-26 


October 2 


Classes Begin 


September 30 


October 6 


Last Day to Add Courses 


October 4 


November 15-16 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 13-14 


November 20-24 


Reading Week 


November 25-29 


December 15 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 13 


January 2 


Classes Begin 


January 6 


January 5 


Last Day to Add Courses 


January 10 


January 15 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 


January 20 


February 5-9 


Reading Week 


February 10-14 


February 21-22 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 26-27 


March 15 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 21 


March 25 


Classes Begin 


March 3 1 


March 29 


Last Day to Add Courses 


April 4 


April 5 


Good Friday Recess 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


May 27 


Memorial Day 


May 26 


May 30 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 5 



Mccormick theological seminary 

1995-96 



1996-97 





FALL 




September 5-23 


Fall Pre-Term 


September 3-21 


September 26-28 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 24-26 


October 2 


Classes Begin 


September 30 


November 8-9 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 13-14 


November 20-24 


Reading Week 


November 25-29 


November 23-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 28-December 1 


December 15 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 13 


January 2 


Classes Begin 


January 6 


January 15 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 


January 20 


February 5-9 


Reading Week 


February 10-14 


February 21-22 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 19-20 


March 15 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 21 


March 25 


Classes Begin 


March 3 1 


April 5 


Good Friday Recess 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


May 6-17 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


May 5-16 


May 27 


Memorial Day 


May 26 


May 31 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 6 



29 



MEADVILLE/LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 

1995-96 



MUNDELEIN SEMINARY 

1995-96 



1996-97 





FALL 




September 25-27 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 25-27 


October 2 


Classes Begin 


September 30 


November 3 


Last Day to Add/Drop Courses 


November 1 


November 23-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 28-30 


December 6-8 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


December 4-6 


December 16 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 14 


January 3 


Classes Begin 


January 6 


January 15 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 


January 20 


February 9 


Last Day to Add/Drop Courses 


February 7 


March 6-8 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


March 12-14 


March 16 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 22 


March 25 


Classes Begin 


March 3 1 


April 26 


Last Day to Add/Drop Courses 


May 2 


May 26 


Memorial Day 


May 27 


June 8 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 14 



1996-97 





FALL 




April 24-May 5 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


April 22-May 3 


September 5 


Classes Begin 


September 9 


September 1 1 


Last Day to Add/Drop a Class 


September 13 


October 9-20 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


October 7-18 


November 10 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


November 15 


November 27 


Classes Begin 


December 2 


December 1 


Last Day to Add/Drop a Class 


December 6 


December 21 -January 3 


Christmas Recess 


December 21 -January 5 


January 8-19 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


January 13-24 


February 16 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


February 2 1 


March 4 


Classes Begin 


March 10 


March 8 


Last Day to Add/Drop a Class 


March 14 


April 3-9 


Good Friday Recess 


March 26-April 1 


April 22-May 3 


Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 


April 21 -May 2 


May 17 


Spring Quarter Ends 


May 23 



30 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



1995-96 



1996-97 





FALL 




September 20-21 


Registration 


September 26-27 


September 25 


Fall Quarter Begins 


September 30 


September 29 


Last Day to Add Courses 


October 4 


October 30-November 3 


Reading Week 


November 4-8 


November 13-16 


Registration for Winter Term 


November 18-21 


November 23-24 


Thanksgiving Holiday 


November 28-29 


December 8 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 12 


January 2-12 


Winter Mini-term 


January 6-16 


January 15 


Winter Quarter Begins 


January 20 


January 19 


Last Day to Add Courses 


January 24 


February 5-9 


Reading Week 


February 3-7 


February 19-22 


Registration for Spring Term 


February 24-27 


March 22 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 28 


April 1 


Spring Quarter Begins 


April 7 


April 4 


Last Day to Add Courses 


April 1 1 


April 5 


Good Friday 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


TBA 


Reading Week 


TBA 


May 27 


Memorial Day Holiday 


May 26 


June 7 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 13 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



1995-96 

August 28-September 15 
September 27-29 
October 2 
October 6 
November 13-17 
November 23-24 
December 16 

January 2-19 
January 5 
January 15 
January 22 
January 26 
February 12-16 
March 16 

March 25 
March 29 

April 5 
May 13-17 

May 27 
June 7 



FALL 

Fall Pre-Term 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Last Day to Add/Drop Courses 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 
"J" Term Intensives 

Last Day to Add/Drop Courses for "J" Term 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 
Regular Classes Begin 



1996-97 

August 26-September 13 

September 25-27 

September 30 

October 4 

November 11-15 

November 28-29 

December 14 



January 6-24 
January 10 
January 20 
January 27 



Last Day to Add/Drop Courses for Regular Term January 3 1 



Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 

SPRING 
Classes Begin 

Last Day to Add/Drop Courses 
Good Friday Recess 
Registration for Summer Term 
Memorial Day 
Spring Quarter Ends 



February 10-14 
March 22 

March 3 1 

April 4 

(Before Spring Quarter) 

May 12-16 

May 26 

June 13 



31 



SEABURY-WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

1995-96 



1996-97 





FALL 




September 21-22 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 26-27 


September 25 


Classes Begin 


September 30 


October 3 


Last Day to Add a Course 


October 7 


November 14-15 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 19-20 


November 20-24 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 25-29 


December 8 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 13 


January 3 


January Term Classes Begin 


January 6 


January 25 


January Term Classes End 


January 30 


January 30 


Post-January Intensive Term Classes Begin February 4 


February 5 


Last Day to Add a Course 


February 6 


February 26-March 1 


Reading Week 


February 24-28 


February 27-28 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 25-26 


March 15 


Post-January Intensive Term Ends 
SPRING 


March 21 


March 25 


Classes Begin 


March 3 1 


April 1 


Last Day to Add a Course 


April 8 


April 5-7 


Easter Recess 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


May 13-17 


Reading Week 


May 19-23 


May 31 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 6 



TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL 



1995-96 



1996-97 
FALL 



September 22, 25-26 


Registration for Fall Quarter September 27, 30-October 1 


September 25 


Classes Begin 


September 30 


October 6 


Deadline for Add/Drop Changes 


October 1 1 


October 10 


Day of Prayer 




November 6 


Reading Day 


November 1 1 


November 23-27 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 28-December 2 


December 15 


Fall Quarter Ends 
WINTER 


December 20 


January 8-9 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


January 6-7 


January 8 


Classes Begin 


January 6 


January 19 


Deadline for Add/Drop Changes 


January 17 


February 6 


Day of Prayer 




February 19 


Reading Day 


February 17 


March 22 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 21 


April 1-2 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


March 31 -April 1 


April 1 


Classes Begin 


March 3 1 


April 5-7 


Easter Recess 


(Before Spring Quarter) 


April 12 


Deadline for Add/Drop Changes 


April 1 1 


April 23 


Day of Prayer 




May 15 


Reading Day 


May 14 


June 14 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 13 



32 



INFORMATION ABOUT COURSE LISTINGS 

ORGANIZA TION AND ABBREVIA TIONS FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

In the section of 'Course Descriptions" which follows, the courses of the ACTS schools 
and of SCUPE are listed for each quarter according to an outline of major areas of study as 
follows: Biblical Studies, Historical Studies, Theological Studies, Ethical Studies, Reli- 
gion and Society Studies, World Mission Studies, History of Religions and Ministry Stud- 
ies. Further subdivisions are indicated within each area. For the complete outline refer to 
the beginning of the Appendix. In each unit of the outline, courses are listed in alphabeti- 
cal order of the initials of the institutions as follows: 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

G-ETS Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

M/L Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

MS Mundelein Seminary 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

NETS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

NCTI Northside Chicago Theological Institute 

NPTS North Park Theological Seminary 

SCUPE Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 

S-WTS Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
This catalog includes those courses open for cross-registration, with the exception that this 
catalog includes a limited selection of the course offerings of MS and TEDS. For complete 
listings of those courses, contact the Registrar of the respective school. 

An H suffix on a course number indicates that the course is taught in Spanish; addi- 
tionally, the course description is given in Spanish. Courses taught in Korean are indi- 
cated by the addition of a K suffix to the course number. 

P following a course description designates that it is necessary to obtain permission 
of the instructor to enroll in the class; L denotes a course with limited enrollment. D 
denotes a course utilizing distance learning technology. 

The standard abbreviations (M, T, W, Th, F, Sa) are used for days of the week. TBA 
is used to indicate that a professor or time for a course remains to be arranged. (See note 
regarding updating course listings in the section on cross-registration below.) 

All courses are equivalent to three quarter hours credit, unless otherwise indicated. 

EXPLANA TIONS OF COURSE NUMBERS 
CTS: 



s of study: 


Levels of courses: 


CH - Christian Heritage 


300-399 - Introductory 


TEC - Theology, Ethics 


400-499 - Intermediate 


and Contemporary Culture 


500-599 - Advamced 


CM - Christian Ministries 


600-699 - Doctoral 



33 



CTU: 




Fields of study: 


B 


- Biblical Studies 


C 


- Cross-Cultural Studies 


D 


- Doctoral Studies 


E 


- Ethical Studies 


H 


- Historical Studies 


I 


- Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 


M 


- Ministerial Studies 


MP 


- Ministry related to Pastoral Theology 


MW 


- Ministry related to Word and Worship 


S 


- Spirituality Studies 


w 


- Word and Worship Studies 


GETS: 




Fields of s 


tudy: 


11 


- Old Testament 


12 


- New Testament 


13 


- Church History 


21 


- Theology 


22 


- Ethics and Society 


31 


- Preaching, Worship and Church Music 


32 


- Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 


33 


- Christian Education 


34 


- Church Administration, Evangelism and 


35 


- Religion and Media 


40 


- Interdisciplinary 


LSTC: 




Fields of s 


tudy: 


B 


- Biblical Studies 


H 


- Historical Studies 


T 


- Theological Studies 


E 


- Ethical Studies 


W 


- World Mission Studies 


M 


- Ministry Studies 


I 

li/f/T . 


- Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 


M/L: 

Fields of s 


tudy: 


B 


- Biblical Studies 


11 


- Historical Studies 


T 


- Theological Studies 


E 


- Ethical Studies 


W 


- World Mission Studies 


HR 


- History of Religions 


M 


- Ministry Studies 


I 

1 /TO. 


- Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 


MS: 

Fields of study: 


BI 


- Sacred Scripture 


SY 


- Systematic Theology 


MO 


- Christian Life 


HI 


- Church History 


WO 


- Worship 


PL 


- Pastoral Life 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 - Introductory or foundational 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 - Advanced 
600-699 - Doctoral 



Levels of courses: 

501-599 - Foundational courses 
601-699 - Advanced courses 



Spiritual Formation 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 - Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 - Advanced 
600-699 - Doctoral 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 - Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 - Doctoral 



Levels of courses: 

200-299 - Required 

300-399 - Intermediate/Elective 

400-499 - Advanced, requiring research 



34 



MTS: 




Fields of study: 


B - 


Biblical Studies 


H 


Historical Studies 


T 


Theological Studies 


E 


Ethical Studies 


W 


World Mission Studies 


M 


Ministry Studies 


I 


Interdiscipl inary /Integrative Studies 


NETS: 




Fields of study: 


BL - 


Biblical Languages 


BS - 


Biblical Studies 


CH - 


Church History 


CN - 


Counseling 


CT - 


Context 


DR - 


Doctoral 


ED - 


Christian Education 


IN 


Integrative/lnterdiscipl inary 


ME - 


Missions and Evangelism 


MN - 


Pastoral/Parish Ministry 


NT - 


New Testament Studies 


OT - 


Old Testament Studies 


PC - 


Pastoral Care 


RS - 


Religion and Society 


SM - 


Supervised Ministry 


TE - 


Ethics 


TH - 


Theological Studies 


UR - 


Urban Ministry 


NPTS: 




Fields of study: 


BIBL - 


Biblical Field 


HIST - 


Historical Field 


HSTX- 


Historical/Theological Field 


MNST- 


Ministry Field 


S-WTS: 




Fields of study: 


01 


Old Testament 


02 


New Testament 


03 


Church History 


05 


Theology 


06 


Spirituality 


08 


Ethics and Moral Theology 


09 


Liturgies 


10 


Religion in the United States 


11 


Church Music 


12, 13 - 


Christian Ministries 


14 


Christian Education 


15 


Practica 


16 


Theological Bibliography 


17 


Preaching 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 - Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 - Advanced 
600-699 - Doctoral 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 - Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 - Advanced 
600-699 - D.Min. 



Levels of courses: 

-099 - Non-credit foundational courses 
1 00- 1 99 - Core or introductory courses 
200-299 - Elective or intermediate courses 
300-399 - Seminar courses 



Levels of courses: 


500-599 


■ Introductory 


600-699 


■ Intermediate; prerequisites 




or permission required 


700-799 ■ 


Advanced; permission 




required for non-doctoral students 



35 



TEDS: 






Fields of study: 


Levels of cou 


OT 


- Old Testament and Semitic Studies 


500-599 


NT 


- New Testament Studies 


600-699 


CH 


- Church History 


700-799 




and the History of Christian Thought 


800-849 


MI- 


- Missions and Evangelism 


850-994 


ST 


- Biblical and Systematic Theology 




PR 


- Philosophy of Religion 




CC 


- Christianity and Contemporary Culture 




CE 


- Christian Education 




PC 


- Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 




H 


- Homiletics 




PT 


- Pastoral Theology 





Introductory courses 
Intermediate courses 
Advanced level courses 
Mainly Th.M. and Doctoral level 
Doctoral level only 



HOW CROSS-REGISTRA TION WORKS 

Students of any of the ACTS schools may take courses from any of the other member 
schools directly and with no added charges. Cross-registration into courses of the ACTS 
Urban Clinical Pastoral Education Program, SCUPE or Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies 
(see pp.16, 19) may involve differing procedures and payment from each ACTS school; 
students are responsible to determine what particulars apply at their own schools. 

Exceptions to the process of cross-registration exist a) during the summer quarter 
when tuition is normally paid to the school offering the course; b) for D.Min. courses other 
than Pastoral Care and Counseling and for those students in the ACTS D.Min. in Preach- 
ing program; c) in certain courses with limited enrollment. Each school in ACTS reserves 
the right to limit enrollment in certain courses for pedagogical reasons and to set its own 
policies for the admission of students from other schools to such courses. 

A student who cross-registers is subject to the policy for incompletes at the school into 
which he or she cross-registers. 

It should be noted that, although the following listings were accurate when published, 
each school issues a list of changes and corrections just prior to registration for each quarter. 
These lists should be consulted through the Registrar of each school before registering for 
courses. 



36 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FALL 1995 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

CTU B547 

Methods of Biblical Interpretation 

Seminar treating several methods currently used to 
interpret biblical texts. The methods, with their pre- 
suppositions and possibilities, will be applied to vari- 
ous kinds of texts and evaluated for their effective- 
ness in opening up the meaning of Scripture. 
Bergant M 1-3:45 Fall 

LSTC B-333 

The Bible: Its Message and Content 

The course is intended for students needing a basic 
introduction to the Bible and its content. Read- 
ing of the Bible will be supplemented with infor- 
mation on biblical times, geography and history. 
DiCicco Th 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 

MTS B-300f 

Introduction to Biblical Studies 

An overview of content and approaches to Scripture 
that are responsible to church and academy. Exege- 
sis of texts from Hebrew Bible and New Testament. 
Special attention to literary types, historical contexts, 
methods and resources for understanding. 
Campbell/Cortes-Fuente MW 8-9:50 Fall 
Campbell W 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 

S-WTS 01/02-503S 

Introduction to Biblical Languages 

The course is designed to provide a very basic un- 
derstanding of biblical Greek and biblical Hebrew, 
as they are located within their language families. 
The alphabets, some vocabulary and other appropri- 
ate exegetical tools will be studied. 
Deeley TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

OLD TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS CH301 

People and Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the 



problems of the critical and theological inter- 
pretation of the Old Testament against the back- 
ground of the development of historical meth- 
ods of biblical study. 
LaCocque Th 9-12:40 Fall 

CTU B300f 

Old Testament Introduction 

A study of the traditions and literature of ancient 
Israel against their historical and cultural back- 
ground. Attention will also be given to some of 
the literary and theological issues involved in bib- 
lical interpretation. 

Bergant MW 10-11:15 Fall 

Hoppe MW 10-11:15 Winter 

Hoppe T 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

GETS 11-511 

Old Testament Interpretation 

A comprehensive introduction to the legal, his- 
torical, poetic and prophetic books of the Hebrew 
Scriptures, with emphasis on the order and con- 
tents, cultural settings, literary forms, religious 
themes and on interpretive approaches. L 
Roth TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

LSTC B-310 

Pentateuch and Historical Books 

Designed to be the introductory course in the field. 
Studies in literary, historical and theological ques- 
tions arising in the interpretation of these books 
in the Old Testament. 
Fretheim T 6-9 p.m. Fall 

Meets at ELCA, 8765 W. Higgins Road 
Klein MTh 10:45-12 Fall 

NBTS OT301 
The Pentateuch 

An introduction to the critical, historical and 
theological study of the Pentateuch with special 
attention given to the major themes of the 
Pentateuch. L 
Mariottini T 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 

NPTS BIBL-105 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis 

The responsibilities of preaching and teaching 



37 



OLD TESTAMENT 



give focus to this course which involves a criti- 
cal reading of selected lectionary texts from the 
Hebrew Bible. Discussion emphasizes the 
characteristics of biblical Hebrew. Prereq: He- 
brew. 4 hours. 
Staff MWTh 11:40-12:55 Fall 



II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTS CH472 

Second Isaiah and the Servant of the Lord 

A selection from Isaiah 40-55. Its poetic beauty 
and theological profundity have warranted for the 
work the title of "Gospel of Hebrew Scripture." 
Special emphasis on the "Four Servant Songs." 
LaCocque W 2-5 Fall 

CTU B405 

Deuteronomistic History 

A study of the story of ancient Israel's life in its 
land as told in the books of Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel and Kings. Emphasis on the theologi- 
cal perspectives of the literature and on archaeo- 
logical background. Prereq: B 300 or equiv. 
Hoppe TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

GETS 11-601 
Pentateuch: Joseph Story 

Advanced study of literary units and theologi- 
cal themes. Emphasis on analytical and syn- 
thetic interpretive skills. L 
Roth TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

LSTC B-620 

Graduate Biblical Seminar I: The Pentateuch 

An ongoing seminar on the Pentateuch materi- 
als. Theme for 1995: Deuteronomy and the 
Deuteronomists. Thorough exegetical study of 
selected texts. (For Post M.Div. students. Ad- 
mission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Fuerst Th 12:30-3:45 Fall 

MS BI323 
The Psalms 

This class is a study of Hebrew poetic genres as 
contained in the Book of Psalms. Emphasis is 
on reading the psalms in their historical and lit- 
erary settings. Christian usage of the Psalms in 
the Liturgy is also examined. 
Schoenstene MTh 2:40-4 Fall 



NBTS OT416 
The Book of Judges 

This class will help students in understanding 
the theological background of the book of Judges 
and the social and historical conditions that pre- 
ceded the rise of the Monarchy in ancient Is- 
rael. Prereq: OT 301 or OT 302 or equiv. L 
Mahottini Th 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 

S-WTS 01-606S 

Studies in Israelite Wisdom and Hymnody: 

The Psalms of Israel 

An examination of the Psalm categories, their 
possible settings and uses and of the Old Testa- 
ment traditions seen in the Psalms, as well as 
considering the use of the Psalms in public wor- 
ship and private devotions. 
Deeley TTh 1-2:50 Fall 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

CTU B415 
Later Prophecy 

A study of selected texts from exilic and post- 
exilic prophets. Emphasis on the relationship 
of prophecy to ancient Israel's social and reli- 
gious institutions. 
Hoppe W 10-12:45 Fall 

LSTC M-457x 

Preaching Old Testament Narratives 

(For course description see Ministry Studies V.) 
Jensen TTh 1-2:15 Fall 

MTS B-435 

Nature in the Hebrew Scriptures 

A re-evaluation of the attitude toward nature in 
Israelite religion; analysis of philosophical is- 
sues; consideration of topics such as creation, 
worship etc.; biblical texts in historical context; 
uses of biblical thought in current ecological 
discussion. 
Hiebert M 9-11:50 Fall 

TEDS OT845A 
Interpreting Hebrew Poetry 

A study of selected poems in both psalmic (e.g. 
Psalm 1, 113) and narrative (e.g., Exodus 15:1- 
17; 1 Samuel 2: 1-10) contexts. Attention to fea- 



38 



NEW TESTAMENT 



tures of Hebrew poetry, detailed poetic and struc- 
tural analyses, detailed contextual analyses of 
these texts. 
Howard TBA Fall 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

LSTC B-300A 
Biblical Hebrew I 

An introduction to the grammar of Hebrew, de- 
signed to equip students to use the language in 
exegetical work. Credit is given for this course 
alone, but the grammar cycle is completed in 
Biblical Hebrew II. 
Klein Sept.. 5-22 Fall Pre-Term 

M-F 8:30-11:30 
Fuerst MWTh 1-2:15 Fall 

MTS B-321 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis I 

The first part of a non-divisible, two-quarter 
sequence. Hebrew grammar, translation and 
exegesis of primarily prose portions of Hebrew 
Bible, fundamentals of text criticism and gen- 
eral principles of interpretation. Credit only 
upon completion of B-322. 
Hiebert TBA Fall Pre-Term 

MTS B-322 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis II 

Continues and completes the sequence begun 
in B-321; see course description above. 
Campbell TTh 10-11:50 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-100 
Beginning Hebrew I 

Knowledge of basic biblical Hebrew is accom- 
plished through a survey of the grammar, trans- 
lation of selected readings and a study of the 
regular verb system. First of a two-term course. 
4 hours. 
Staff MWTh 2:15-3:30 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-102 
Intermediate Hebrew 

To assist students in developing a greater facility 
with the Hebrew language, varied texts from the 
Hebrew Bible are selected for reading and dis- 
cussion. Prereq: Beginning Hebrew. 1 hour credit. 
Koptak TBA Fall 



NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B305f 

New Testament Introduction 

The New Testament writings in their historical, 
cultural, religous and social context. Introduc- 
tion to the methodological tools employed in 
New Testament research and to the diverse the- 
ologies that comprise the New Testament wit- 
ness to Jesus of Nazareth. 
DiCicco M 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

DiCicco MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

Lenchak MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

G-ETS 12-501f 

New Testament Interpretation: Matthew- Acts 

Theory and practice of exegesis in relation to 
selected passages, including textual, literary, 
form- and redaction-criticism and the use of pro- 
grammed instruction. Exploration of the theol- 
ogy of the evangelists. Lectures and section 
meetings. L 

Vena MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

Vena TTh 8:30-10:50 Winter 

LSTC B-332 

The Life and Letters of Paul 

Study of the unique character and thought of Paul 
in the context of the first-century world. Stu- 
dents will interpret Paul's letters and explore 
themes in his theology and ethics. 
Rossing MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

+ disc, sec.: Th 9-9:50 
Rhoads MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

+ disc, sec: Th 9-9:50 

NPTS BIBL-111 
Introduction to Greek Exegesis 

A study of the procedures and tools used in the ex- 
egetical process, including the principles and prac- 
tice of textual criticism, translation and syntax. Ex- 
perience will be gained through the exegesis of a 
New Testament book. Prereq: Greek. 4 hours. 
Belleville MWTh 11:40-12:55 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-250 

Interpreting the New Testament II: 

Acts-Revelation 

This course is an introduction to the New Testa- 



39 



NEW TESTAMENT 



merit texts from Acts through Revelation with 
special emphasis on historical, sociological, lit- 
erary and hermeneutical issues of the interpre- 
tation of these texts. 4 hours. 
Grafton M 7-10 p.m. Fall 

Belleville MWTh 11:40-12:55 Spring 

S-WTS 02-501GS 

New Testament Interpretation I: Gospels/Acts 

Designed for the student with no previous work 
in Bible: focused on the principles of exegesis 
with examination of selected passages in the light 
of textual, literary, form criticism and redaction 
criticism. Attention to first-century Judaism. 
Pervo TTh 1-2:50 Fall 



readers. Attention to miracles, exorcisms, pas- 
sion/resurrection, discipleship, eschatology, gen- 
tile mission and Jesus' questioning of the reli- 
gion of his day. 
Okoye TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

GETS 12-612 

2 Corinthians 

Historical setting and literary problem of 2 
Corinthians from viewpoint of redaction, rhe- 
torical and audience criticism; attention to theo- 
logical and ethical concepts Paul developed in 
response to missionaries invading this congre- 
gation. Prereq: 12-502. L 
Jewett TTh 3:30-5 Fall 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTS CH424 

The Theology of John 

An exegetical study of the Gospel of John with 
the intent of seeing Christian reality from the 
point of view of the author of the fourth gospel. 
Special emphasis is placed on its particular style. 
Snyder W 9-12:40 Fall 

CTU B440 

The Gospel According to John 

A study with attention to this gospel's distinc- 
tive style and theology, overall structure and 
content. Key sections used to highlight such 
major Johannine motifs as religious symbolism, 
sacraments, community and spirituality. Prereq: 
B 305 or equiv. 
Bowe TTh 11:30-12:45 Fall 

CTU B452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

The life and thought of Paul in his cultural and 
theological setting examined in selected letters 
with a view to their message for the contempo- 
rary church. Prereq: B 305 or equiv. 
Bowe T 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

CTU BC433 

The Gospel of Mark 

in Cross-Cultural Perspective 

Focus on interplay between the narrative, its 
socio-cultural matrix and the cultures of today's 



LSTC B-670 

Graduate Biblical Seminar V: 

Reading Romans 

A Greek reading course on the grammar, syntax 
and text of Romans as a basis for interpretation, 
engaging in close reading of Romans in consul- 
tation with grammars and commentaries. (For 
post M.Div. students. Admission of others by 
consent of instructor.) 
Rhoads M 12:30-3:45 Fall 

LSTC M-458x 
Preaching Mark's Gospel 

(For course description see Ministry Studies V.) 
Jensen Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 

MTS B-401K 

Gospel of John (Taught in Korean) 

Exegesis and discussion of the Fourth Gospel. 
Emphasis on structure, historical background, 
uniqueness in comparison with Synoptic Gos- 
pels. Study and discussion of critical and theo- 
logical issues. Reflection on theological and 
ministerial possibilities. 
C. H. Park TBA Fall P re-Term 

MTS B-402 

Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the Gospel in its socio-historical and 
literary contexts. Emphasis on ways Matthew 
deals with Hebrew Scripture and earlier Chris- 
tian traditions in the literary composition of the 
Gospel and its theological and hermeneutical 
implications. 
Cortes- Fuentes MW 2-3:50 Fall 



40 



NEW TESTAMENT 



MTS B-402K 

Gospel of Matthew (Taught in Korean) 

Interpretation of Gospel of Matthew through 
exegesis and reflections; historical settings re- 
constructed and theological questions raised and 
addressed against historical background; inter- 
pretation of key passages to show author's theo- 
logical stance. 
E. C. Park TBA FallPre-Term 

MTS B-403 
Epistles of Paul 

An introduction to the seven undisputed letters 
of Paul. Emphasis on developing students' own 
exegetical competence and ability to analyze and 
evaluate theological argumentation. 
Mitchell MW 8-9:50 Fall 

NBTS NT 301 
Matthew, Mark and Luke 

This course is a general introduction to the Syn- 
optic Gospels. It gives attention to the distinc- 
tive story of Jesus found in each gospel and also 
explores their literary and theological relation- 
ships. L 
Cosgrove T 9-1:30 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-157 
The Gospel of John 

Examines John's distinctive presentation of 
Jesus' life. Focus on Jesus' interaction with 
those of diverse religious, economic, social, po- 
litical and educational backgrounds. Explores 
theological and practical implications for the 
church today. L 
Belleville W 2-5 Fall 

TEDS NT762 
Johannine Theology 

Seminar in the theology of the Johannine litera- 
ture including critical appraisal of representa- 
tive modern works. 
Staff TBA Fall 



tices for health and wellness in the first Chris- 
tian community. The procedures will be exam- 
ined in light of the several social matrices. 
Snyder M 9-12:40 Fall 

CTU B525 

Rabbinic Judaism 

and Jesus' Jewish Background 

Designed to deepen the student's understand- 
ing of the relationship of early Christianity to 
Rabbinic Judaism and to develop a capacity to 
interpret Jewish sources from Talmud and 
Midrash, this course examines the nature of 
Rabbinic Judaism. 
Perelmuter W 10-12:45 Fall 

CTU BW465 

Liturgy of the Synagogue I 

An overview of worship forms in the contempo- 
rary American synagogue with special reference 
to the common thread and variations in the Jew- 
ish denominations and to historical backgrounds. 
(This course is sponsored by the Jewish 
Chautauqua Society.) 
Perelmuter TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

MTS B-487K 

New Testament Theology (Taught in Korean) 

Course will survey theological trends in the New 
Testament and discern a unifying theme in New 
Testament theologies. Effort will be made to 
appreciate diversity in theological thinking in 
early Christianity. 
E. C. Park TBA Fall P re-Term 

NPTS BIBL-260 

New Testament Theology 

Attention to methodological issues and to ma- 
jor modern New Testament theologians. At- 
tempts to clarify both the distinctive theologies 
within the New Testament and also the deep 
congruence and unity among the documents 
without sacrificing either. 4 hours. 
Stegner M 2-5 Fall 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN NEW TESTAMENT 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 



CTS CH431 

Healing in the New Testament 

An examination of the presuppositions and prac- 



CTU B320 
Biblical Greek I 

A basic introduction to the grammar and vocabu- 



41 



NEW TESTAMENT 



lary of the Greek New Testament. 
Lenchak TWTh 8:30-9:45 



Fall 



G-ETS 12-641 
Elementary Greek I 

Essential forms and principles of New Testa- 
ment Greek. Two units; credit for 12-641 after 
satisfactory completion of 12-642. 
Stegner T-F 8-8:50 Fall 

LSTC B-307 
Biblical Greek I 

An introduction to Greek, designed to equip students 
to use the language in exegetical work. LSTC M.Div. 
students are required to complete the Greek sequence 
with B-308 Biblical Greek II. 
Rossing MWTh 1-2:15 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-098 

Beginning New Testament Greek I 

An inductive approach to the Greek language is 
used which de-emphasizes memorization. Fo- 
cus is on basic grammar, vocabulary and the 
development of reading skills. First of a two- 
term course. 4 hours. 
Katter MWTh 2:15-3:30 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-112 

New Testament Greek Readings 

To increase the facility of students in reading Greek, 
various passages from the New Testament will be 
translated. Prereq: Greek. Pass-Fail. 1 hour. 
Belleville TBA Fall 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS CH344 

History of Christian Thought I: Foundations 

A survey of significant theological, social and 
political movements of the early Christian 
Church through the late Middle Ages, focusing 
on the Western Church. 
Thistlethwaite W 9-12:40 Fall 

CTU H307 

The Middle Ages and the Reformation 

Council of Chalcedon (451) to the Council of 
Trent ( 1 545-1 563). focusing on development of 



the medieval church, relations between East and 
West, history of theology, breakdown of the 
medieval synthesis and the significance of the 
major reformers. 
Madigan MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

G-ETS 13-501f 
History of Christianity I 

A survey of the life, thought and development 
of Christianity from the post-Apostolic period 
to the Great Schism (a.d. 1054). L 
Groh TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

Groh TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 13-503f 

History of Christianity III 

Key events, people and concepts in the 19th and 
20th centuries. Attention to theological, ethical 
and institutional formulations, power structures 
and to contributions of the Black church, women 
and Third World Christians. Discussion sec- 
tion required. L 

Murphy MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

Keller TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

LSTC H-310 

Early and Medieval Church History 

A basic introduction to Christian history and 
theology until the Reformation. Lectures and 
discussions of primary sources by both men and 
women of the early and medieval periods. 
Hendel MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Jiiris son M 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 

Nelson M 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 

Meets at Bethlehem Lutheran Church St. Charles 

MTS H-300f 

Transformations of Christianity: 

A Foundational Course 

Survey of the history and transformations of 
Christianity by exploring the formation and de- 
velopment of major epochs: early, medieval, 
Reformation, modern. 

Daniels M 6-9:20 p.m. Fall 

TBA TTh 10-11:50 Spring 

MTS H-412 

The Reformation Era 

Historical and theological overview of European 
Christianity in 16th and 17th centuries from later 
medieval Catholicism through divisions of the 



42 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 



Thirty Years War, including Lutheran, Zwinglian, 
Calvinist, radical reformers and the English Ref- 
ormation. 
Sawyer Th 9-11:50 Fall 

NPTS HIST-110 

Christian Heritage I: 

The Early Medieval Church 

A basic introduction to the history of the Chris- 
tian church from apostolic times through the 
Middle Ages, with emphasis on the expansion 
of the church, persons, institutional growth and 
theological development. 4 hours. 
P.Anderson MWTh 8-9:15 Fall 

S-WTS 03-50 IS 

General Church History I: 

The Early Church (100-600) 

A survey of church history from the time of the 
Apostolic Fathers to that of St. Gregory the Great 
with emphasis upon the development of ecclesial 
and theological traditions. 
Pervo MW 1-2:50 Fall 

S-WTS 03-502S 

General Church History II: 

The Medieval Church (600-1500) 

A survey of church history from Gregory the Great 
to the Renaissance, with emphasis on institutional, 
theological and devotional developments. 
Kieckhefer MW 1-2:50 Fall 

II. HISTORY OF 
PARTICULAR TRADITIONS 

CTU DH557x 

Jansenism—Newman: 
Preparing for Vatican II 

(For course description see Theological Studies II.) 
Linnan M 1-3:45 Fall 

LSTC H-459H 

Temas Principales 

de la Teologia Latinoamericana 

(Major Themes of Latin American Theology) 

Este curso le proveera al estudiante la 
oportunidad de familiarizarse con una seleccion 
de estudios que han surgido en America Latina 
dando origen a una nueva manera de enterder la 
fe y la mision y ministerio de la iglesia. 
Rodriguez M 7-9:50 p. m. Fall 



M/L H394 

Unitarian Universalist History 

An introduction to Unitarian Universalist history, 
focused toward preparing ministers to help con- 
gregations become aware of the heritage of lib- 
eral religion. The course's major emphasis is 
American Unitarianism and Universalism. 
Godbey MF 9-10:20 Fall 

M/L H494 

Unitarian Universalist History 

in the Twentieth Century 

An advanced course structured to provide a com- 
parative historical context for more detailed study 
of the religious ideas and institutional develop- 
ment of the Unitarian and Universalist movements 
during the twentieth century. Prereq: H394. P 
Godbey TBA Fall 

MTS H-416K 

The History of the Korean Church, 1884-1988 

(Taught in Korean) 

The Korean Church has a brief history. Many Chris- 
tian theologies, traditional Korean religions, social 
and cultural forces helped to shape the church. This 
course will explore the unique character of the Ko- 
rean Church due to these influences. 
Lee M 6-8:50 p.m. Fall 

NPTS HIST-300 

History and Theology of the Covenant Church 

Designed to help the student understand and 
interpret the evangelical and pietistic tradition 
within which The Evangelical Covenant Church 
stands. Special attention is given to the Refor- 
mation and Pietism. 4 hours. 
P.Anderson MWTh 10:15-11:30 Fall 

III. HISTORY — INDIVIDUALS 

G-ETS 13-608 

Theology of Martin Luther 

Introduction to Luther's life and theological contri- 
bution through study of his sermons, treatises and 
letters. Prereq: 13-501, 502 or 503 or equiv. L 
Stein TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

LSTC H-435 

Theology of Luther 

The purpose of this course is to examine Luther's 
theology by exploring its broad comprehensiveness 



43 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 



as well as its evangelical center. Selected works on 

various theological themes are discussed. 

Hendel M 1-3:30 Fall 

TEDS CH845A 
Jonathan Edwards 

This study of Jonathan Edwards will concen- 
trate on his intellectual and spiritual contribu- 
tion to American Christianity. The class will 
read and discuss several of his sermons as well 
as his works on revival, Christian experience 
and Christian theology. 
Nettles TBA Fall 

IV. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY 

CTU H416 

The American Catholic Experience 

The main problems and solutions of the Ameri- 
can Catholic community: immigration, accul- 
turation, education, social questions, anti-Ca- 
tholicism, Church and State, adaptability to na- 
tionalism, theology and discipline before and 
after Vatican II. L 
Ross W 2-4:45 Fall 

GETS 13-642f 

Topics in American Religious History: 

Black Church Leadership 

Examination of significant issues, movements and 
persons. Prereq: 13-501, 502 or 503 or equiv. 
Murphy TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

MTS H-423 

American Christianity and Modernity 

Study of the transformation of U.S. Christianity 
through its encounter with modernity from the 
colonial era to the present, highlighting renewal 
movements, theological trends, liturgical cur- 
rents and social reform movements. 
Daniels W 9-11:50 Fall 



V. SELECT TOPICS 
IN CHURCH HISTORY 

CTU CH325 

Models of Missionary Activity 

A survey of the variety of forms of missionary 
activity in the Church's history from the Apolo- 
gists in the Roman Empire to the classical im- 
age of the 19th-century missionary. The rel- 
evance of these models for mission today is also 
considered. 
Schroeder MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

CTU SH400x 

History and Spirituality of Christian 

Monasticism 

(For course description see Ministry Studies II.) 
Madigan TTh 11:30-12:45 ' Fall 

GETS 13/31-617x 

History of Christian Worship 

(For course description see Ministry Studies IV.) 
D. Vogel TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

NPTS HIST-256 

The Bible in American Life 

This seminar examines the function, use and 
status of the Bible in American culture. Some 
attention to the academic study of the Bible, but 
primary focus on the way the Bible has been 
used in various movements by particular groups 
and individuals. 
Graham TBA Fall 



THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 



TEDS CH845B 

American Spiritual Awakenings 

A survey of the history of spiritual awakenings 
and revivalism in the United States with atten- 
tion to the origins, controversies and spread of 
the First and Second Great Awakenings, the 
Businessmens' Awakening and the Post- World 
War II "Awakenings." 
Woodbridge TBA Fall 



CTS CH344x 

History of Christian Thought I: Foundations 

(For course description see Historical Studies I.) 
Thistlethwaite W 9-12:40 Fall 

CTS TEC 500 
Interpretation 

A seminar examining diverse modes of theologi- 
cal interpretation aiming at developing skills in 



44 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



relating theological perspectives to the concrete 

human situation. P 

Jennings/Cairns M 9-12:40 Fall 

CTU D325f 

Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources and meth- 
ods of theology worked out from a study of sev- 
eral case-histories. Special emphasis on his- 
torical revelation in Christianity and the devel- 
oping awareness of faith in relation to shifting 
horizons. 

Hayes MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Bevans MW 10-11:15 Spring 



survey of the basic doctrines of the Christian faith, 
helping students develop their own theological 
perspectives. Topics in first term include the doc- 
trines relating to the First Article of the Creed. 
Pero MTh 10:45-12 Fall 

Hefner M 10:45-12; Th 10:45-12:45 Fall 

NBTS TH302 

Problems in Faith and Theology 

This course introduces the student to theologi- 
cal construction, engagement with the histori- 
cal and traditional sources of theology and the 
practice of ministry. 
Sharp W 2:30-5:15 Fall 



G-ETS 21-500f 

Contexts and Methodologies 

for Contemporary Theology 

Introduction to cross-cultural study of system- 
atic theology. Examines factors affecting the 
Euro-American context in relation to African, 
Asian and Latin American contexts and of philo- 
sophical and cultural developments affecting 
theological method. L 

Young TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

D.Vogel MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

GETS 2 1-50 If 
Systematic Theology I 

The meaning and methods of systematic theology; 
Christian understanding of God, Trinity, creation, 
persons and history and eschatology. Prereq: three 
foundational courses in Bible and history. L 
Young TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

Will Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

W 9-10:50: F 9-11:50 

LSTC T-301 
Unity and Diversity 

Exposes students to classic theological state- 
ments in Catholic Christianity and in the 
Lutheran tradition. Also addresses the global 
and multicultural mission of the church and how 
Christian and Lutheran identity is defined by 
context. Double course. 
Fuerst/Jiirisson/Pero Sept. 5-22 Fall Pre-Term 
M-F 8:30-1 1:30 + a weekend plunge 

LSTC T-311 
Christian Theology I 

The first of a three-course sequence providing a 



NPTS THEO-300 
Systematic Theology I 

The center of the Christian faith is the person 
and work of Jesus Christ as confessed on the 
basis of Scripture and reflected upon in the 
Christian tradition. 4 hours. 
Staff MWTh 11:40-12:55 Fall 

S-WTS 05-50 IS 
Introduction to Theology 

Especially concerned with the presuppositions 
and methods of theological inquiry, the course 
deals with ways of talking responsibly about 
God, Jesus Christ and Christian living. The 
philosophical and ecumenical contexts for do- 
ing theology are considered. 
TBA WF 9-10:50 Fall 

II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

CTU CD460 

U.S. Latino Theologies 

A survey of the theologies being developed by 
U.S. Latino theologians and present in Latino 
fiction. Special attention will be paid to theo- 
logical starting points, methodology and pasto- 
ral implications. 
Riebe-Estrella MW 10-11:15 Fall 

CTU DH557 

Jansenism—Newman: 
Preparing for Vatican II 

Decadence and development in Catholic theol- 
ogy during the 18th and 19th centuries. Con- 
fronting the enlightenment, romanticism and the 



45 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



industrial and scientific revolutions, Catholic 
theology lays the foundation for the "new theol- 
ogy"" of Vatican II. 
Linnan M 1-3:45 Fall 

G-ETS 21-644 

The Liturgy of the Synagogue 

Inquir)' into history, structure and content of Jew- 
ish worship from biblical times to the modern 
era. Examination of various types of liturgy of 
both the traditional and modern synagogue. 
One-half unit. 
Schaalmann W 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

LSTC T-529 

The Theology of Karl Barth 

This seminar will explore the theological thought 
of one of the foremost theologians of the 20th 
century in its intellectual and political context. 
HiXtter W 6-9 p.m. Fall 

M/L TS322f 

Literature for Liberal Religion: 

Liberal Religious Texts 

In search of "scriptures'" for the liberal faith, 
this course explores materials in literature, the- 
atre, music and the fine arts. How do such texts 
gain authority for us? How do we use and inter- 
pret in worship, preaching, education and pub- 
lic ministry? 
Shadle et al. Fall 

Required Registration and Preparation 
Shadle et al. Jan. 15-19 9-5 Winter 

M/L TS336f 

Theologies of the Liberal Churches 

Significant ways of thinking religiously current 
in liberal churches and fellowships (primarily, 
but not only, those of the Unitarian Universalist 
Association). Empirical theism, religous human- 
ism and feminist theology will be discussed. L 
Evison et al. Required Registration Fall 
Evison et at. Jan. 8-12 9-5 Winter 

NBTS TH435 

The Black Christian Tradition 

Course introduces students to the theological 
reflections and writings of African-American 
Christian theologians who seek to interpret the 
relevance of the Gospel to the historical, cul- 
tural and socio-political dimensions of the Black 



Church in America. 

Foy M 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 

III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTS TEC 361 

Dynamics of the Sacred 

Fundamental phenomenology/psychology of re- 
ligion will be read for insights into the contem- 
porary meanings of uniquely religious vocation 
and leadership. Readings will include Otto, 
Eliade, Jung, etc. who focus on human encoun- 
ter with the sacred. 
Moore T 9-/2:40 Fall 

CTS TEC 402 

Atonement: The Theology of the Cross 

In what way is the cross the center of Christian 
faith and proclamation? How does the cross of 
Jesus transform human history and existence? 
Examination of classical and modern interpre- 
tations lays the basis for constructive reformu- 
lation. 
Jennings T 9-12:40 Fall 

CTU D430 

Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

Analysis of why God has become problematic 
for contemporary society followed by critical 
review of representative Christian attempts to 
respond. The course helps students evaluate 
their experience and respond intelligently to the 
modern problem of God. 
Linnan W 7-9:45 P.M. Fall 

CTU D508 

Theology and Community 

A seminar which investigates the community as 
the source and the parameters of theological re- 
flection. 
Bevans M 10-12:45 Fall 

CTU DC442 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry 

Studies Jesus the Christ revealed through Scrip- 
ture, traditions and theological scholarship, to help 
students understand the meaning of Jesus Christ 
for their personal life, contemporary society and 
as ground for mission or pastoral practice. 
Phelps M 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 



46 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



G-ETS v 21-602 

Process Philosophy and Theology 

Process philosophy as reformation of traditional 
Christian understandings of God, persons and 
the world; use of process perspectives and cat- 
egories to do theology. Consideration of 
Whitehead, Teilhard, Hartshorne, Cobb and 
Williams. L 
Will TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

G-ETS 21-636 

Feminist Theology: A Systematic Perspective 

Discusses God, creation, humanity, sin, 
Christology, salvation and church as critiqued by 
feminist theology; the reconstruction or 
resymbolization of these motifs in light of affirm- 
ing full partnership of women with men in the 
church. Prereq: 21-501. L 
Ruether T 6-9 p.m. Fall 

LSTC T-441 

Religion and American Politics 

Historical background and contemporary inter- 
pretation of the relationship between religion 
and politics in American culture. Topics: Ameri- 
can political theology, "The New Religious 
Right," the role of civil religion, separation of 
church and state. 
Busse Th 2:30-5 Fall 

LSTC T-466 

Genetics, Faith and Ministry 

Includes introduction to basic genetic science, 
theology and pastoral ministry in light of ad- 
vances in genetic engineering. Multi-disciplin- 
ary staff, visits to labs and hospitals. L P 
Hefner F 1:30-4 Fall 

MS SY322 

Catholic Theology 

and the Thought of C. G. Jung 

Examines Jung's conception of the dynamics of 
the psyche in light of a theological anthropol- 
ogy, placing special emphasis on the notions of 
the imago Dei, the natural desire for God and 
the nature of religious experience. 
Barron TF 8:25-9:45 Fall 

MTS T-404 
Doctrine of Christ 

Considers the doctrine of the person and work of 



Jesus Christ as the basis for Christian faith in God. 
Particular attention to problems of the uniqueness 
and the universality of Jesus Christ vis-a-vis other 
bases of faith. Prereq: T-300 or equiv. 
Parker T 6-8:50 p.. m Fall 

MTS T-433 
Feminist Theology 

Explores feminist challenges to traditional Christian 
theology. Diverse perspectives within feminist 
thought brought into conversation; attention given to 
feminist critique and reconstruction of central Chris- 
tian doctrines. Prereq: T-300 or equiv. 
Case-Winters T 9-11:50 Fall 

NETS THMN405 

Readings in the Theology of Ministry 

This seminar-style course will read and discuss 
recent books and articles relevant to construct- 
ing a contemporary theology of ministry. L 
Dayton M 7-9:40 p.m. Fall 

NCTI Seminar I 

(=MS SY 429; NPTS THEO-279; S-WTS 

FALL; TEDS PT 675) 

The Church and Its Mission 

Explores the views of several major Christian 
communions on the nature of the Church and 
its mission with lectures by representatives from 
these denominations and field trips by student 
teams to congregations of each communion. 
Meets at various locations. 
Butler et al. TBA Fall 

S-WTS 05-580S 
The Christian Life 

This course draws upon contemporary 
hermeneutics and narrative theory, theories of 
actions and the disciplines of sacramental theol- 
ogy, ascetical theology and moral theology in or- 
der to give an account of the practices that form 
the Christian life. 
Sedgwick TTh 3-4:50 Fall 

S-WTS 05-630S 

Classics of Mystical Theology 

A seminar exploring diverse traditions of Chris- 
tian mystical theology through careful reading 
of classic texts. Theologians to be considered 
will vary from year to year. L 
Barker W 6-8:50 p.m. Fall 



47 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



TEDS ST730 

The Problem of Evil 

Examines one of the traditional problems for 
Christian Theism. First clarifies the nature of 
this attack against theism, then discusses dif- 
ferent defenses and theodicies offered in re- 
sponse. Treatment covers problem in both logi- 
cal and evidential forms. 
J. Feinberg TEA Fall 



GETS 22-506 

Christian Ethics and Human Sexuality 

Pastoral, theological, ethical and historical in- 
terpretations of sexuality, bringing into conver- 
sation gay men and lesbians, African Americans, 
womanist and feminist perspectives, Euro- 
American evangelicals and the Euro-American 
men's movement. L 
Eugene T 6-9 p.m. Fall 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

I. MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTS TEC 321 
Christian Ethics 

Historical and contemporary Christian ethical 
systems with a consideration of their implica- 
tions and current significance. 
Matthews T 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTU E370f 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

This course is an introductory study of the basic 
themes of Christian ethics. Particular attention 
will be paid to the Roman Catholic moral tradi- 
tion, including such topics as the virtues, the natu- 
ral law, moral decision-making and narrative. 
Nairn MW 1-2:15 Fall 

Wade 11 M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU E375f 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

An exploration of the basic texts that illumi- 
nate how the Christian community has under- 
stood and shaped its response to the social con- 
cerns of its time. Emphasis is given to founda- 
tional texts of the Roman Catholic tradition. 
Wadell MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

Pawlikowski MW 1-2:15 Spring 

GETS 21/22-503f 
Theological Ethics 

A foundational course in theology and ethics. 
The formulation and implementation of ethical 
norms derived from faith commitments, based 
on the study of theory and practice (cases); de- 
velopment of a self-conscious methodology. L 
K.Vaitx MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Fall 

Eugene TTh 9-10:50 Spring 



LSTC E-310f 
Christian Ethics 

A study of the sources, structure and dynamics 
of Christian ethics, with reference to current 
problems of personal and public life. (Not open 
to first-year students.) 

Hutter TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Hutter TTh 3:50-5:05 Winter 



II. SELECT TOPICS IN ETHICS 

CTU E456 

The Ethics of Thomas Aquinas 

This course is a study in the moral theoiogy of 
Aquinas. Particular attention is given to his 
treatment of happiness, charity, the passions, the 
virtues and the gifts of the Spirit. 
Wadell MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU E590 

Sustaining Life: Ethical Challenges 

An examination of the major global issues of 
our time, including food, energy, environmental 
preservation and homelessness. Ethical frame- 
works for responding to these issues will be 
developed out of both ecclesiastical and secular 
materials. 
Pawlikowski W 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU EC402 

Natural Law and Christian Ethics 

A study of the relevance of some Western and 
non-Western Natural Law traditions in view of 
arriving at a vision of a universal common good 
that can generate a Christian ethical discourse 
capable of inter-cultural and inter-religious com- 
munication. 
Fornasari TTh 10-11:15 Fall 



4X 



RELIGION AND SOCIETY STUDIES 



CTU EC588 

Seminar on Christ, Community 

and Christian Ethics 

This course is designed to study the implica- 
tions of Christology for the life of the Christian 
community as an ethical community in an in- 
creasingly secular, scientific, culturally and re- 
ligiously pluralistic world. 
Fornasari W 1-3:45 Fall 

GETS 22-641 

African-American Critical Thought 

Examines developing critical thought of Afri- 
can-Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries 
as they came to understand their "situation," 
developed constructive theoretical and practi- 
cal responses and brought alternatives to mean- 
ings and values of the U.S. L 
Eugene TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

M/L E438 
Eco-Justice Citizenship 

A seminar devoted to understanding/evaluating 
current initiatives by religious and secular groups 
to make the Chicago region a just and sustain- 
able community. 
Engel F 1:30-4 Fall 

MTS E-416 
i Justice In and For Families 

I An examination of contemporary interpretations 
of justice/injustice in relation to families. Ex- 
ploration of implications of theories of justice 

i for public policy and ministry of churches on 
issues of family life. 
Livezey M 1-3:50 Fall 

MTS E-432 

Multicuituralism and Christian Ethics 

A critical study of the origin and development 
of multicuituralism for identifying its ethical 
challenges to Christian faith. The course will 
examine various leading theories and critically 
assess the options of Christian ethics. 
Chun T 1-3:50 Fall 

TEDS ST774 
Introduction to Bioethics: 
Matters of Life and Death 

An overview of the Hippocratic/Judeo-Christian 
tradition in medical ethics against the back- 



ground of biblical-theological discussion of hu- 
man nature, medicine and healing, and as a con- 
text for the rise of the new bioethics. 
Cameron TBA Fall 

RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 

CTS CM560x 

Readings in Women, Psychology, Religion 

and Culture 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Miller-McLemore M 2-5 Fall 

LSTC M-370f 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

A consideration of the church's invovlement in 
the public sector. Emphasizes the relation be- 
tween faith and justice and the importance of 
social analysis as the basis for the church's work 
of advocacy. 

Bloomquist/Strehlow W 2:30-5 Fall 

Perry Th 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

LSTC T-441x 

Religion and American Politics 

(For course descriiption see Theological Studies in.) 
Busse Th 2:30-5 Fall 

S-WTS 10-60 IS 

Religion, American Society and Culture 

Beginning with the development of the church 
in the modern world, consideration will be given 
to secularization, the church as a voluntary as- 
sociation, the functions of the church in society 
and specific community studies. 
TBA TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

SCUPE S-H301 
Conceptions of a City 

Introduces students to Chicago as an excellent 
laboratory setting for studying urban issues. 
Students also become acquainted with several 
models of ministry in the city. 4 hours. Fees 
may apply; see p. 19. 
Frenchak/McGibbonSept. 5-16 Fall 

SCUPE S-H302 
Urban Systems 

Examines the social, economic and political sys- 



49 



RELIGION AND SOCIETY STUDIES 



terns affecting citizens' quality of life in indi- 
vidual communities and the metropolitan region 
as a whole and seeks to find new ways of trans- 
forming them when necessary. 4 hours. Fees 
may apply; see p. 19. 
Cooper T a.m. Fall 

WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 

CTU C410 

Mission: The Contemporary Challenge 

What are the implications of the call to mission for 
every Christian? This course examines mission at 
the limits of our own cultural and religious experi- 
ence, calling for transformation and conversion. 
Gittins MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

CTU C458 

Hispanic Faith and Culture 

Religion and culture, faith and life are inseparable 
for Hispanics. How are these values expressed within 
the Hispanic community? What are the pastoral 
implications? This course will explore these aspects 
of Hispanic faith and culture. 
Pineda TTh 11:30-12:45 Fall 

CTU C575f 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar 

An integrating seminar for those returning from 
missionary, cross-cultural or overseas training 
(OTP) placements. 

Schroeder W 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

Schroeder W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU CD460x 

U.S. Latino Theologies 

(For course description see Theological Studies II.) 
Riebe-Estrella MW 10-11:15 Fall 

CTU CH325x 

Models of Missionary Activity 

(For course description see Historical Studies V.) 
Schroeder MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 



CTU DC442x 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry 

(For course description, see Theological Studies III.) 
Phelps M 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

CTU EC402x 

Natural Law and Christian Ethics 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Fornasari TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

CTU EC588x 

Seminar on Christ, Community 

and Christian Ethics 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Fornasari W 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU/MTS C460f 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry 

Designed to prepare for cross-cultural and glo- 
bal ministry and mission, using Paulo Freire's 
methodology to provide theological, spiritual, 
experiential dimensions and ecumenical/inter- 
faith dialogue. Optional field trip to Lakota 
Reservations in SD. 

Barb our /Doidge M 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

Doidge/Schroeder M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

LSTC W-312 

Epic of the Global Church 

A panoramic view of the emerging 21st-century 
global church in all continents. Church growth, 
inculturation, ministry, witness, unity movements, 
political and ethical challenges are studied. 
Scherer Th 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 

LSTC W-424 

Conflict and Reconciliation: 

Christian Encounter with People of Other 

Faith Commitments 

Challenges from social and industrial change come 
to all people. Religious communities meet those 
challenges with different resources. This course will 
explore what these resources are and examine them 
in light of our own faith commitments. 
Kaserow/Vogelaar TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 



CTU CMP541x 

Marriage and Family 

in Cross-Cultural Context 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Gittins/ Anderson Th 10-12:45 Fall 



LSTC W-433 

Indigenous Religion and Mission 

in North America 

A study of the encounter of two religious visions: 
the Native American's response to the natural 



50 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



environment and the Christian identification of 
the same environment as a promised land. 
Lindberg T 2:30-5 Fall 

NPTS MNST-150 

Introduction to Missions 

A study of the biblical basis of missions and 
various theologies of mission will be considered. 
Issues in Covenant missions, policies, mission- 
ary call and qualifications will be examined. 
Weld W 7-10 p.m. Fall 

NPTS MNST-250 
Mission of the Church 

An examination of the biblical basis of mission 
and various theologies and methods for carry- 
ing on that mission, particularly by the Covenant, 
at home and abroad are examined. 4 hours. 
Weld MWTh 11:40-12:55 Fall 

TEDS ME675 

Women in Cross-Cultural Ministry 

Surveys women in cross-cultural ministry from the 
early church to the present. Emphasizes contempo- 
rary issues such as ''call," preparation and support, 
mission board distinctives, cultural adaptation, in- 
terpersonal problems, future trends, etc. 
Tucker TBA Fall 

HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 

LSTC W-428 

Towards Understanding Islam 

This course introduces the student to the ori- 
gins of Islam, the Qur'an, Muslim worship and 
characteristics of Muslim life in the modern 
world, as well as the challenges this presents 
for Christian witness. 
Vogelaar TTh 1-2:15 Fall 

LSTC W-529 

The Life and Times of Mohammad 

A study of the prophet Muhammad and the role 
he plays in exemplifying the Qu'ran and the 
model Muslim life. Students will also explore 
the rich literature of Tradition, which comprises 
the second authoritative source for Muslim life 
and thought. 
Aasi MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

CTU M409f 

Ministry on the Margins 

Uses readings and field experiences to explore 
selected areas in ministry. Possible opportuni- 
ties include justice and peace, alcoholism, street 
ministries, ministry with persons involved in 
prostitution. By arrangement with justice and 
peace staff. P 
Staff TBA Fall/Winter/Spring 

GETS 40-675 

Cross-Cultural Theological Education 

Provides a structured learning environment to 
enable students to maximize their cross-cultural 
experiences, helping them to integrate their 
cross-cultural exposure into their theological 
understanding and philosophy of ministry. Two- 
quarter course. L 
Codman-Wilson Th 6-9 p.m. Fall/Winter 

LSTC M-416 
Local Immersion 

An extension of the Pilot Immersion Project for 
the Globalization of Theological Education. 
Students are assigned to individuals or groups 
who are carrying on social or cross-cultural min- 
istry in the metropolitan area. All year for 1 
course credit. 
Lindberg Th 5-6:30 p.m. Fall/Winter/Spring 

LSTC M-450 

Senior Seminar: 

Theology and the Church's Ministry 

An integrative course dealing with the role of 
theology in pastoral formation and functioning, 
and based on experiences and problems encoun- 
tered in internship. 

TBA M 8:30-9:45; 10:45-12 Fall 

Rodriguez TTh 10:45-12 Fall 

M/L M360f 
Aesthetics/Arts in Ministry 

This course is an exploration of the relationships 
between theology, ministry and the arts. A spe- 
cial emphasis will be placed on drama, dance 



51 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



and visual arts as forms of religious expression 
and experience. L 

Tolley Required Registration Fall 

Tolley Jan. 8-12 9-5 Winter 

M/L M365 

Arts of Ministry: Leadership 

First part of year-long sequence on liberal ministry. 
Explores the role of liberal religious leadership, con- 
siders the nature of its various institutional contexts 
and assists students to frame working drafts of their 
personal covenants as ministers. P 
Shadle W 9:30-12 Fall 

M/L M413f 

Leadership Theory and Practice 

The roles of the liberal religious leader in vari- 
ous contexts. Varieties of leadership styles, 
group dynamics and development and conflict 
management will be considered. Theoretical 
and practical aspects will be addressed. L 
Bishop Required Registration Fall 

Bishop Jan. 15-19 9-5 Winter 

NBTS MN330H 

Liderazgo pastoral en contexto hispano 

(Pastoral Leadership in the Hispanic Context) 

Consideracion de los fundamentos biblico- 
teologicos del ministerio y sus implicaciones 
para la administracion de congregaciones 
hispanas, a la luz de sus distintivos socio- 
economico-culturales y denominacionales. 
Schipani F 9:30-12:10 Fall 

NPTS MNST-136 

The Church's Ministry with Families 

A systems approach is used here in the study of 
family life, developmental stages, needs and 
problems. A variety of ministry models and re- 
sources is examined and evaluated. 
Staff TBA Fall 

SCUPE M301 

The Black Church in an Urban Culture 

Focuses on the organization and dynamics of 
African-American life as experienced in the 
city's minority-dominant communities. Orga- 
nized around the shared social institutions 
unique to the African-American experience. 4 
hours. Fees may apply, see p. 19. 
Martin Oct. 2-6 Fall 



II. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTS CM 431 

Minister as Spiritual Director 

An examination and experience of ministry as 
spiritual direction. In addition to exploring theo- 
retical issues relating to Christian spirituality 
and personal formation, students will offer and 
receive spiritual direction. 
Moore W 2-5 Fall 

CTS TEC361x 

Dynamics of the Sacred 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Moore T 9-12:40 Fall 

CTU S402 

Introduction to the Christian Spiritual Life 

Surveys traditional and contemporary practices 
of prayer, community, service, discernment and 
spiritual guidance, with the aim of assisting 
development of an integrated vision of the Chris- 
tian spiritual life. 
TBA MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

CTU S417 

Theology of Religious Life 

This course will examine Christian vocations 
in their specific relationship to the church and 
the world, the charisms proper to religious life, 
celibacy, solitude-community, and the history 
and meaning of commitments. 
TBA TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU S430 

Religious Experience and the Life Cycle 

Using Erikson's eight stages of the life cycle as 
a framework, explores aspects of psychological 
development undergirding the experience of re- 
ligion. Aspects covered include faith, symbol- 
ism ritual, conscience, commitment, humility 
and mysticism. 
Frohlich MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU S505 

Foundations for the Study of Spirituality 

Defines spirituality as a field of study; explores the 
relationship between spiritual praxis and research in 
spirituality; surveys research methods; evaluates the 
notion of a "spiritual classic;" examines issues in the 



52 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



historical study of spirituality. L 
Frohlich M 1-3:45 



Fall 



CTU S 540 

Group Spiritual Process 

Participants will practice and study a group re- 
flective process for spiritual formation. Students 
may subsequently form and lead a group of their 
own as part of the Supervised Leadership Train- 
ing (D.Min.) or another ministry practicum. P L 
Luther M 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

CTU SH400 

History and Spirituality 

of Christian Monasticism 

A historical survey of the institution and spiri- 
tual practices and texts of Christian monasti- 
cism, beginning with the Egyptian fathers, con- 
centrating on Benedictine monasticism and its 
offshoots, and concluding with the 13th-century 
mendicant orders. 
Madigan TTh 11:30-12:45 Fall 

CTU WS650x 

Liturgical Foundations of Spirituality 

(For course description see Ministry Studies IV.) 
Ostdiek M 8:30-11:15 Fall 

G-ETS 34-606 

Prayer in Christian Ministry 

Identifying, exploring and participating in di- 
verse forms of prayer and meditation, grounded 
in Scripture and tradition. Attention to personal 
spiritual formation and to integration of prayer 
with the functional roles of pastor and Chris- 
tian educator. L 
Troxell TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

M/L I300f 

Spiritual Journey Workshop 

An immersion into the process of our own spiri- 
tual journeying, employing a method of theo- 
logical reflection as developed by E. Whitehead, 
T. Groome, H. R. Niebuhr and others, which is 
useful for personal as well as institutional use. 
One half credit. P L 
Gerdes T 4-5:30 Fall/Winter /Spring 

MS MO405(Sp) 

Spirituality by Way of Autobiography 

An analysis of the autobiographical writings of 



Augustine, Julian of Norwich, Teresa of Jesus, 
Therese of Lisieux and Thomas Merton reveals 
the unchanging call of the Gospel and the vary- 
ing cultural forms in which Christian spiritual- 
ity is realized. 
Cameli W 2:40-5 Fall 

MS MO408(Sp) 
Interiority and Catastrophe 

Out of the experience of the Holocaust and the 
Second World War there emerged a body of pro- 
foundly spiritual literature. These writers are 
studied: Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Anne Frank, Elie 
Wiesel, Etty Hillesum and Alfred Delp. L 
Cameli MTh 1:15-2:35 Fall 

MTS M-427 
Tending the Spirit 

Learners will examine relationships between 
personal spiritual disciplines, small groups and 
congregational life and develop ways of account- 
ability for spiritual practices as leaders of con- 
gregations into Christian life. 
Hawkins T 9-11:50 Fall 

NBTS MN414 

Readings in the Spiritual Masters 

Emphasis will be on the practices of formative 
reading. Class members will be asked to read 
one of the classics in Western spirituality. It 
will be time of both reading and reflection and 
of application to one's own life in the Spirit. 
Clemmons W 2:30-5:10 Fall 

NPTS MNST-102 

Spiritual Formation II: Life of Prayer 

Presentations and discussion provide introduc- 
tion to the scope and variety of the prayers and 
practices of the Christian tradition. Small groups 
provide further discussion, experience and time 
for prayers with each other. 1 hour. 



Carlson/Staff 



T 8-9:50 



Fall 



NPTS MNST-106 

Discipleship: Theory and Practice 

The course aims to provide a comprehensive and 
practical experience in being a disciple, mak- 
ing disciples and training disciples. It is in- 
tended to equip students to do person-context 
and church-context discipling. 
Reed M 7-10 p.m. Fall 



53 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

III. PASTORAL CARE 

CTS CM 463 

Lesbian/Gay Sexuality and Spirituality 

Concerning the split between spirituality and 
sexuality, the embodiment of spirituality, the 
creation of patriarchies, the interlocking nature 
of sexism, racism and homophobia. Samaritan 
Institute Sexuality Studies course; licensure re- 
quirement, MCC. 
Goss Weekends in Oct. and Mar. Fall 

CTS CM 542 

Contemporary Cultures of Psychology 

Seminar focusing on current psychological theo- 
ries (e.g., Freud, Erikson, Horney, Kohut) in 
order to 1) familiarize persons with theories, 2) 
provide critical tools of analysis and 3) position 
psychologies within a broader ethical/religious 
framework. 
Miller-McLemore Th 9-12:40 Fall 



G-ETS 32-501f 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

An introductory course including a study of hu- 
man development, growth, crisis and pathology; 
the development of skills in integrating theol- 
ogy and the practice of ministry with an under- 
standing of human growth and interpersonal 
relationships. L 

Hinkle Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 

Rector Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

Th 6-9:30 p.m. + 1 TBA 

GETS 32-614 

Introduction to the Psychology of Religion 

Exposes students to quasi-scientific study of 
religious experience and behavior from psycho- 
logical and normative perspectives (biblical and 
theological). Enables students to analyze reli- 
gious experience and behavioral data from vari- 
ous perspectives. 
Rector Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 



CTS CM 560 

Readings in Women, Psychology, Religion 

and Culture 

A seminar on selected contemporary writings. 
Investigates 1) new developmental models, 2) 
altered views of therapy, and 3) understanding 
of reality. Reflection on the impact of feminist 
psychology upon the church. 
Miller-McLemore M 2-5 Fall 

CTU CMP541 

Marriage and Family 

in Cross-Cultural Context 

"Marriage" and "family" are building blocks of the 
Christian community, but across cultures there are 
diverse forms' and patterns. Pastoral care and an- 
thropology combine, hoping to uncover new insights 
and applications for pastors and missionaries. 
Gittins/ Anders onTh 10-12:45 Fall 

CTU MP360f 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Focuses on 1 ) the many contexts of care; 2) prin- 
ciples and dynamics of pastoral care; 3) skills in 
empathic listening and responding to various hu- 
man situations. Time is required outside the class 
in practice sessions with peers and instructors. L 
Anderson MW 10-11:15 Fall 

Anderson MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 



G-ETS 32-620 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling 

Students must have access to pastoral care/coun- 
seling cases. Students will explore the interac- 
tion between culture and personality, as they 
develop pastoral care skills, understandings and 
strategies. Full-year course; one unit for three 
quarters. L P 
Hinkle TBA Fall/Winter/Spring 

GETS 32-631 

Pastoral Counseling: The Pastor as Counselor 

Exposure to theory and practice of pastoral coun- 
seling for the prospective parish pastor. Em- 
phasis on counseling skill development as well 
as theological, cross-cultural and psychological 
models of interpretation. 
Hinkle F 9-12 Fall 

LSTC M-484 

Ritual and Pastoral Care 

Explores the interface between pastoral care and 
the occasional services of the church. How does 
the church's liturgical life meet the many human 
needs that attend baptisms, marriage, confirma- 
tion, services of healing or Christian funerals? D 
Bangert/Billman Th 2:30-5 Fall 

Meets simultaneously at LSTC and 
at ELCA, 8765 W. Higgins Road 



54 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



NPTS MNST-120 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Case methods, role play, demonstrations, read- 
ings and lecture impart strategies and skills to 
equip the pastor for working with the congrega- 
tion to provide an effective ministry to personal 
and family needs. 4 hours. 
Bray MWTh 10:15-11:30 Fall 

TEDS PC732 

Crisis Counseling 

A consideration of the theology and practice of 
crisis intervention, with emphasis on the Chris- 
tian implications of crisis counseling, the train- 
ing of crisis counselors and the dynamics of spe- 
cific crisis situations. P 
Stark TBA Fall 

IV. LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

CTU BW465x 

Liturgy of the Synagogue I 

(For course description see New Testament III.) 
Perelmuter TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

CTU MW412 

Administration for Catechetical Leaders 

Builds a theoretical and practical foundation for 
catechetical ministries. An intensive learning 
opportunity for both new and experienced min- 
isters, focusing on program development, vol- 
unteer formation, collaborative leadership. 
Meets in Joliet. 

Osterholt/Walsh Fall P re-Term 

July 19-20 9-4; July 21 9-12: 

August 16-17 9-4; August 18 9-12 

CTU W350 
Introduction to Liturgy 

Basic issues and elements of Christian liturgy 
with special attention given to the liturgical 
documents of the Roman Catholic Church. Re- 
quired lab sessions on dates announced at the 
beginning of the quarter. 
Hughes T 1-3:45 Fall 

CTU W455f 

Becoming a Catholic Christian: 

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults 

Historical, theological and pastoral reflection on 



the experience and sacraments of Christian ini- 
tiation, with particular focus on the Rite of Chris- 
tian Initiation of Adults as the norm for initia- 
tory practice. Fall Section B will meet at Joliet 
site. 

(A) Hughes TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

(B) Fragomeni Intensive Fall 

Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 11, 18 
Hughes W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU W566 

Ecumenical Issues in Worship 

Seminar includes developing principles of 
ecumenism, researching the belief and experi- 
encing the actual worship of various Christian 
churches. Participants will be enabled to enter 
into both theological and liturgical dialogue. 
Schaab Th 8:30-11:15 Fall 

CTU WS650 

Liturgical Foundations of Spirituality 

Readings and seminar presentations on struc- 
tures, prayer forms, rhythms and theology of lit- 
urgy, to uncover liturgical foundations and di- 
mensions of Christian spirituality. Open to M.A. 
and advanced M.Div. students with instructor's 
permission. 
Ostdiek M 8:30-11:15 



Fall 



G-ETS 13/31-617 

History of Christian Worship 

Examination of development of Christian wor- 
ship from its Jewish background and New Tes- 
tament setting to Greek Orthodox, Roman 
Catholic and various Protestant liturgical forms. 
Prereq: 13-501, 502 or 503 or equiv. L 
D. Vogel TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

GETS 31-51 If 
Christian Public Worship 

The importance of worship in the life and work 
of the minister and the congregation. Increas- 
ing competence in the understanding, theology, 
planning and leadership of worship. L 
Duck WF 9-10:50 Fall 

Duck MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-484x 

Ritual and Pastoral Care 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Bangert/Billman Th 2:30-5 Fall 



55 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

NPTS THEO-202 

Worship: The Church, Sacraments 

and Liturgy 

The study of worship is the study of God's ser- 
vice to the church (word, sacrament) and the 
church's service to God (praise, prayer, procla- 
mation, ritual). 4 hours. 
Staff MWTh 8-9:15 Fall 

S-WTS 09-522S 
Anglican Worship 

A study of the Book of Common Prayer and the 
distinctive Anglican ethos of worship from the 
first Prayer Book of 1 549 and its sources to the 
American Prayer Book of 1979. 
TBA WF 9-10:50 Fall 

TEDS PT770 
Christian Worship 

The importance, basic meaning and historical 
background of Christian worship with attention 
to principles, plans, methods and resources for 
worship planning. 
Olsen TBA Fall 

V. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 



may not be taken during a student's first year or 
its part-time equivalent. 

(A)Chatfield TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

(B)Duck TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

Chatfield Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

MW 5:30-7:30 p.m. 

(A)Chatfield TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

(B)Chatfield WF 9-10:50 Spring 

GETS 31-605 

The Uses of Story in Preaching 

Exploration through reading, experimentation 
and practice preaching of some ways story has 
been and can be used to enhance preaching, such 
as plotted structure, participatory preparation, 
imaged argument and eventful language. Prereq: 
31-501 or equiv. L 
Chatfield T 6-9 p.m. Fall 

GETS 35-631 

Religion/Chicago: Reporting on Religion 

Develop prototype of publication Religion/Chicago, 
designed to reflect best religion reporting: choose, 
research, write, edit stories; design publication un- 
der supervision of journalists. Prepares students to 
communicate within and beyond the church. L 
Larson T 6-9 p.m. Fall 



CTU MW450f 

Introduction to Liturgical Preaching 

This practicum examines the homily as a litur- 
gical action within the Christian assembly. Par- 
ticipants consider liturgical, pastoral, cultural 
and practical dynamics of preaching and effec- 
tive communication skills. L 
Fragomeni M 1-3:45 Fall 

Fragomeni T 1-3:45 Winter 

CTU MW458 

Preaching the Sunday Lectionary: Cycle A 

MW 458 considers the homily in the Sunday assem- 
bly. Participants will study the lectionary cycle, 
preach several homilies and survey the entire cycle 
of readings. Prereq: MW450 or equiv. L 
Fragomeni T 3:30-6:15 Fall 

GETS 31-501f 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

The growth of the sermon from text and idea 
through presentation and evaluation. Delivery 
of sermons by each student in class. The course 



LSTC M-457 

Preaching Old Testament Narratives 

Course consists of 1) biblical studies on some 
of the narrative material of the Hebrew Bible 
with some emphasis on "narrative analogy;" and 
2) preaching on selected texts, concentrating on 
telling the biblical narratives in the context of 
the wider story. 
Jensen TTh 1-2:15 Fall 

M/L M412f 
Preaching 

This course focuses on students developing 
preaching skills in the context of liberal reli- 
gious worship. Attention will also be paid to 
the history and philosophy of homiletics in the 
liberal religious tradtion. L 
Alexander et al. Required Registration Fall 
Alexander et al. Jan. 22-26 9-5 Winter 

MTS M-417 

Releasing Imagination in Preaching 

This course helps to exercise a more creative 



5 b 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



imagination in preaching by exploring imagina- 
tive engagement with Scripture, experimenting 
with creative sermon shapes and language and 
imaginative use of gifts in sermon delivery. 
Wardlaw F 9-11:50 Fall 



rhythms of young people's lives with dynamics 
of family, school, church and peer groups, e.g., 
disaffected youth, pressures for achievement, 
media and gangs. 
Baker Th 6-9 p.m. Fall 



NBTS MN382 
Principles of Preaching 

This introductory course in preaching is designed 
to acquaint the student with the basic knowl- 
edge and skills necessary for effective preach- 
ing. Special attention will be given to the ex- 
egesis of Scripture and sermon organization. L 
Duffett/Butkr T 2:30-5:10 Fall 

NBTS MN382H 

La predicacion pastoral: 
una perspectiva hispana 
(Pastoral Preaching: A Hispanic Perspective) 

Introduction a fundamentos biblicos-teologicos, 
contextualizacion sociologica y presupuestos 
metodologicos para una predicacion pastoral y 
contextual. Los/as estudiantes presentaran — 
no predicaran — sermones para evaluation de la 
clase y profesor. 
Mottesi T 2:30-5:10 Fall 

NPTS MNST-210 
Introduction to Homiletics 

The student will learn the fundamentals of a 
theology of preaching and principles of sermon 
construction and will practice these learnings 
in laboratory experiences. 
Koptak MWTh 10:15-11:30 Fall 



VI. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

G-ETS 33-506 

Theological Education in the Parish 

Task of the pastor and educator as theological 
educators in the parish. Interplay of theology 
and teaching methods within the life and mis- 
sion of the community of faith. L 
Seymour T 6-9 p.m. Fall 

GETS 33-611 

Youth, Culture and the Church 

Design of strategies for the church's ministry 
with youth and young adults. Issues relating 



G-ETS 33-615 

Adults and Christian Faith 

Ways adults learn; faith issues, lifestyles and 
resources, and their implications for educational 
approaches of the church to young, middle and 
older adults. L 
L. Vogel TTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

LSTC M-360 

Educational Ministry: Teaching and Learning 

Students will study the theological and develop- 
mental foundations of Christian Education and 
put them into practice by teaching at four age lev- 
els, using four different teaching-learning mod- 
els. Part of the Teaching Parish experience. D 

(A) Hyman Oct. 3-Nov.9 TTh 6-9 p.m. Fall 

(B) Schmidt W 2:30-5:15 Fall 

M/L M400f 

History and Philosophy of Religious Education 

Explores major formative figures in the devel- 
opment of modern religious education theory and 
practice, with particular emphasis on the work 
of John Dewey. Attention also to the thought of 
contemporary theorists and emerging issues. 
Harlow et al. Required Registration Fall 
Harlow et al. Jan. 22-26 9-5 Winter 

M/L M420 

Liberation Theology and Critical Pedagogy 

Theoretical and practical dimensions of libera- 
tion theology giving shape to religious educa- 
tion practice for the 21st century. Particular at- 
tention to critical pedagogy and education for 
justice and peace, which examines issues of race, 
gender and class. 
Harlow M 2-4:30 Fall 

MTS M-313 

Educational Ministry of the Church 

Course offers an introduction to the field of re- 
ligious education by examining educational min- 
istry in a congregation. Attention to theories in 
practice that enable persons to grow in faith. 
Caldwell T 1-3:50 Fall 



57 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



MTS M-335K 

Principles of Christian Education 

(Taught in Korean) 

Focus on helping students articulate purpose of 
educational ministry; examine concepts of teach- 
ing/learning; understand life cycles; teach Bible 
as basic tool. Special attention to helping the 
Korean-American church. 
Ko TBA Fall P re-Term 

MTS M-409H 

Educacion cristiana en la iglesia hispana 

(Christian Education in the Hispanic Church) 

Las bases, la practica y la teoria del ministerio 
educativo. La educacion cristiana se considera 
en terminos del crecimiento de la fe y del 
habilitar para la adoracion, equipar para la vida 
en comunidad y capacitar para la mision en 
medio de la historia. 
Schipani F 1-4:50 Fall 

MTS M-503 

Seminar: Contemporary Issues 

in Religious Education 

Seminar is designed as a reading course for dis- 
cussion of current texts in religious education 
theory and practice. Non-divisible two-quarter 
course. Prereq: one or two courses in religious 
education. P 
Caldwell TEA Fall/Winter 

NBTS ED302H 

El ministerio educativo de las iglesias hispanas 
(The Educational Ministry of Hispanic 
Churches) 

Intento de compresion de los fundamentos 

biblicos-teologicos, sicologicos, filosoficos y 

socio-culturales del ministerio educativo. Los 

materiales en uso y la realidad eclesial hispana 

seran considerados en busqueda de un ministerio 

contextual. 

Schipani Th 6:30-9:10 p.m. Fall 

NPTS MNST-131 

Introduction to Christian Education and 

Discipleship 

The conceptual framework for the building of 
an effective teaching ministry in the local church 
is examined: historical, biblical, developmen- 
tal, educational and organizational. 4 hours. 
Staff W 2-5 Fall 



NPTS MNST-240 

Ministry with Single Parents and Step- 
parents 

A weekend seminar focusing on experiential 
development of skills in working with this grow- 
ing segment of society. 1 hour. 
Staff TBA Fall 

TEDS CE503 

Psychological and Sociological Foundations 

of Christian Education 

Study of the changes in human behavior by 
which skills, knowledge and attitudes are 
learned; survey of learning theory; sociological 
problems in church education in light of the 
development of individuals in relation to their 
socio-economic background. 
Downs TBA Fall 

VII. POLITY AND CANON LAW 

CTU MW421f 
Church and Structure 

An introductory course treating the nature, role 
and history of canon law; church structures; 
Eastern rites; ministries and holy orders; cleri- 
cal discipline; the teaching office; acts of non- 
sacramental worship; sacred places and times; 
general norms. 

Neville W 7-9:45 p.m. Fall 

Neville MW 10-1F15 Spring 

MTS M-307f 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship 

in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 

Preparation for thinking and acting effecively 
in various church structures. Special attention 
given to relation between polity, politics, lead- 
ership and church life. 

Hindman Sept. 9-11 TBA Fall P re-Term 

Hindman Th 9-1F.50 Winter 

S-WTS 13-505S 
Canon Law 

A two-fold introduction to 1 ) the history of Chris- 
tian canonical legislation with particular empha- 
sis on the canonical structures of the Episcopal 
Church; and to 2) the use of canon law in pasto- 
ral ministry. One half unit. 
Amadio M 6-7:50 p.m. Fall 



58 



OLD TESTAMENT 



WINTER 1996 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

CTU BC490x 

Biblical Foundations for Mission 

(For course description see World Mission Studies.) 
Lenchak TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU SB480 

Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

The religions of Israel and early Christianity are 
investigated not only in their historical and bib- 
lical setting but also in their impact on Chris- 
tian life and ministry. 
Bowe TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 



esis through Judges). 
Staff MWTh(F) 



■9:15 



Winter 



NPTS BIBL-147 

Old Testament Faith I: Torah 

Attention is given in this course to method in 
interpreting the Scriptures and to an understand- 
ing of the ancient Near East. Primary focus is 
placed on the messages of the first five books of 
the Old Testament. 
Koptak Evening TBA Winter 

II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTS CH402 
Leviticus 

Text and commentaries. 

Schaalmann Th 9-12:40 Winter 



TEDS ST751 
Hermeneutics 

The science of biblical interpretation with ex- 
amination and explanation of the various sys- 
tems of such. Using selected passages of Scrip- 
ture, the disciplines necessary in biblical inter- 
pretation come to be understood and developed. 
Osborne TBA Winter 

OLD TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B300w 

Old Testament Introduction 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Hoppe MW 10-11:15 Winter 

LSTC B-311 

Old Testament Methods of Study 

Introduces students to the methods of interpret- 
ing Old Testament texts, using the Hebrew lan- 
guage. Special attention will be given to the 
Psalms and wisdom literature. 
Fuerst MTh 10:45-12 Winter 

Michel MTh 10:45-12 Winter 

NPTS BIBL-120 
Old Testament Faith I 

The literature of the ancient Near East and the 
Jewish-Christian traditions provides the contexts 
in which we "listen" to the Hebrew Bible (Gen- 



CTS CH403 
The Book of Daniel 

A "strange book," Daniel is bilingual, 
pseudepigraphic, esoteric, apocalyptic and narra- 
tive. Ostensibly of the 6th century b.c.e., its date 
is between 165-164, time of Hellenization, per- 
secution and judgment. A literary genre whose 
relevance is evident. 

LaCocque Feb. 1 5-8 p.m.; Winter 

Feb. 9-10; 16-17 9-5 

CTU B425 

Wisdom Literature 

A study of the wisdom theology with its empha- 
sis on human behavior. Primary focus will be 
on the themes of creation, suffering, birth and 
death, retribution and immortality as found 
within the wisdom literature. 
Bergant MW 1-2:15 Winter 

LSTC B-532 

Selected Pericopes from Isaiah 40-66 

A seminar on Second and Third Isaiah focusing 
on the Servant Songs and other texts from Isaiah 
40-66, especially those used in the ecumenical 
lectionary. Emphasis on values of the texts for 
preaching and meditation. 
Michel T 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

LSTC B-630 

Graduate Biblical Seminar II 

An ongoing seminar on the Old Testament and 



59 



OLD TESTAMENT 



cognate literature. Theme for 1996: Ancient 
Near Eastern Literature and Religion. (For post- 
M.Div. students. Admission of others by con- 
sent of instructor.) 
Klein M 12:30-3:45 Winter 

MTS B-405 
Yahwist Revolution 

A study of Israel's antecedents, birth as a people, 
early life as a nation, focusing on Genesis- 1 
Samuel. Attention to appropriate critical meth- 
ods for content and theology of Israel's epic tra- 
dition, law and oldest poetry. 
Campbell T 1-3:50 Winter 

NBTS OT302 

The Former Prophets 

An introduction to the critical, historical and 
theological study of the books of Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel and Kings. Special attention will be 
given to the historical, political, religious and 
social events that shaped Israelite society. L 
Mariottini T 6:30-10 p.m. Winter 

NBTS OT304H 

Los Profetas Mayores (The Major Prophets) 

Una introduccion al mensaje de los profetas 
Isaias, Jeremias y Ezequiel. El curso dara 
atencion especial a la situacion historica, politica 
y social que forma parte del ministerio de los 
profetas. L 
Mariottini Th 6:30-10 p.m. Winter 

TEDS OT735 

Exegesis of Psalms 

Overview of the Psalter's structure, major 
genres, themes, theology and exegesis of repre- 
sentative psalms. Prereq: OT602 or equiv. 
Ortlund TBA Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

CTU B417 
Intertestamental Literature 

A survey of non-canonical Jewish literature pro- 
duced from 200 b.c. to a.d. 200. Emphasis on 
prayer in these texts. 
Hoppe TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 



G-ETS 11-602 

Historical Books: Elijah/Elisha 

Advanced study of literary units and theological 
themes. Emphasis on analytical and synthetic 
interpretive skills. Prereq: 11-511 or equiv. L 

Roth Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

W 9-10:50; F 9-11:50 

MTS B-320 

Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls 

Examination of archaeological and literary evi- 
dence in order to better understand origins, his- 
tory, life, institutions, interpretations of Scripture 
and law, and relationships to early Christianity. 
Tanzer W 9-11:50 Winter 

MTS B-437 

Job and Its Modern Interpreters 

A study of the literary structure and theological 
themes of the book of Job in its biblical context, 
combined with an analysis of selected treatments 
of Job such as those of Archibald MacLeish, C. 
S. Lewis, Gustavo Gutierrez and Bill McKibban. 
Hiebert M 1-3:50 Winter 

TEDS OT706 
Geography of Bible Lands 

Physical geography of Palestine including natu- 
ral regions, political units, geographical history 
since antiquity, identification of ancient sites and 
a description of the present state of excavation 
at each tell or location. 
Beitzel TBA Winter 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

CTU B 325 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I 

This is the first part of a two-quarter course 
which studies the grammar and vocabulary of 
biblical Hebrew in order to prepare students to 
work with the Hebrew text. 
Hoppe MTWTh 8:30-9:30 Winter 

G-ETS 11-641 
Elementary Hebrew I 

Introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew 
(grammar and syntax) and translation of selected 
prose texts in the Hebrew Bible. Two unit 



60 



NEW TESTAMENT 



course; credit for 11-641 upon satisfactory 
completion of 1 1-642. 

Roth Jan. 8-26 Winter 

T-F 8:30-10:30; T-Th 2-4:30 



CTU B305w 

New Testament Introduction 

(For course description see Fall.) 
DiCicco MW 2:30-3:45 



Winter 



GETS 11-642 
Elementary Hebrew II 

Continues and completes sequence begun in 1 1- 
641; see description above. 
Roth Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

M 5:30-7:20 p.m.; TTh 3:30-5:10 

LSTC B-301 
Biblical Hebrew II 

A continuation of Biblical Hebrew I taught in Fall. 
Fuerst MW 1-2:15 Winter 

MTS B-430 

Hebrew III: The Book of Genesis 

A reading of selected sections of the book of Genesis 
with attention to the grammar, syntax and style of 
Pentateuchal narrative. Literary, historical and theo- 
logical aspects of the exegesis of Genesis will be 
examined. Prereq: B-32 1/322 or equiv. 
Hiebert TTh 8-9:50 Winter 

NPTS BIBL-101 
Beginning Hebrew II 

The study of Hebrew grammar and the verbal sys- 
tem is completed by the middle of the term. The 
remaining time is given over to readings from vari- 
ous texts in the Hebrew Bible. Prereq: BIBL-100. 
Staff M(T)WTh 3:15-4:30 Winter 

NPTS BIBL-103 
Intermediate Hebrew 

(For course description see Fall NPTS BIBL- 1 02.) 
Koptak TBA Winter 



NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS CH321 

Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the origin, interrelationship and in- 
tent of the three synoptic gospels. Special at- 
tention is given to the form and function of a 
gospel. 
Jennings W 9-12:40 Winter 



GETS 12-501w 

New Testament Interpretation: Matthew-Acts 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Vena TTh 8:30-10:50 Winter 

LSTC B-335 

New Testament Methods of Study 

Introduction to the tools and methods for inter- 
preting the New Testament with practice in so- 
cial analysis, historical investigation, word stud- 
ies, literary criticism and liberation exegesis. 
Greek prerequisite for LSTC M.Div. students. 
Krentz/ Rossing MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

+ disc, sec: Th 2-2:50 or 3-3:50 

NPTS BIBL-150 

Interpreting the New Testament I: 

The Gospels 

In this introductory treatment of the Gospels, 
attention will be given to hermeneutics, critical 
studies, the characteristics and message of each 
of the Gospels and Jesus' proclamation of King- 
dom. 4 hours. 
Belleville MWTh(F) 11:40-12:55 Winter 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B430 

The Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the context, structure and major mo- 
tifs of the Gospel of Matthew. Particular atten- 
tion will be given to the evangelist's role as an 
interpreter of tradition and history for a com- 
munity in transition. 
Osiek M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

LSTC B-547 

1 Peter: Christianity in a Hostile World 

Exegetical interpretation of the Greek text with spe- 
cial attention to its form, content and social world. 
Study of its ecclesiology, ethics and eschatology in 
the light of the Greco-Roman context. Preaching 
from 1 Peter in the lectionary year. 
Krentz TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 



61 



NEW TESTAMENT 



MTS B-446 

The Thessalonian Correspondence 

Exegetical course, translating, interpreting and ap- 
propriating 1 and 2 Thessalonians. Literary features, 
rhetorical functions and hermenutical implications 
reflected against the setting of the implied audience. 
Prereq: B-300, Greek I and II or equiv. 



Brawley 



W 6-8:50 p.m. 



NBTS BL470H 

Exegesis Biblica: Santiago (Exegesis of James) 

Estudio del libro de Santiago dando atencion 
especial tanto al metodo como a su genero 
literario, estructura, contenido, su papel en la 
vida de la iglesia, y su valor especial para la 
iglesia hispanoamericana. 
Horning Th 3-6:30 Winter 

NBTS NT 411 
Romans 

An introduction to modern critical scholarship 
on Romans. It also explores questions of theo- 
logical method in examining Paul's letter from 
the perspective of Jewish/Christian dialogue and 
the African-American tradition. Prereq: a basic 
course on Paul. 
Cosgrove Sa 1-4:30 Winter 

NPTS BIBL-153 

The Gospel of Mark 

This course is a study of the life and teachng of 
Jesus as distinctively presented by the gospel 
writer. Attention is given to matters of structure, 
theology and relevance for the life of the church. 
Phelan M 2-5 Winter 

TEDS NT711 
Galatians 

Comprehensive examination of the logic and 
theology of Galatians with special attention to 
Paul and the Law. Prereq: reading knowledge 
of Greek. 
Osborne TEA Winter 

CTS CH427 

The Letters of the New Testament 

A survey of the letters of the New Testament 
with emphasis on historical context and theo- 
logical importance. Stress will be placed on 
developing an exegetical method. 
Snyder W 9-12:40 Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN NEW TESTAMENT 

CTS CH435 

Parables in the New Testament 

The parables of Jesus will be examined in terms 
of their original context and the present context. 



Winter Snyder 



T 9-12:40 



Winter 



CTU B417x 
Intertestamental Literature 

(For course description see Old Testament III.) 
Hoppe TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU BH504 
Apostolic Fathers 

Detailed historical, literary and theological study 
of the earliest post-biblical Christian writings 
as extensions of New Testament faith in the ear- 
liest years of the church. 
Osiek T 2-4:45 Winter 

GETS 12-606 

The Parables of Jesus 

Contemporary parable research as a way of dis- 
covering the meaning of the parables in the 
message of the early church and in the teaching 
of Jesus. Attention to form and Jewish back- 
ground of the parables. Prereq: 12-501 or equiv. 
Stegner Jan. 8-19 Winter 

MF 8-12; TWTh8-ll 

LSTC B-473/G-ETS 12-617 

New Testament and Film 

This course will use film as the cultural me- 
dium through which to relate the New Testa- 
ment to our time. Students will correlate bibli- 
cal exegesis with such films as Boyz N The 
Hood, The Piano, Philadelphia and In the Name 
of the Father. Meets at LSTC. L D 
Jewett/Rhoads Feb. 6-March 12 Winter 

TTh 6-8:50 p.m. 

LSTC B-660 

Graduate Biblical Seminar VI 

An ongoing seminar on canonical and non-ca- 
nonical texts. Theme for 1996: Apostolic Fa- 
thers. (For post-M.Div. students. Admission of 
others by consent of the instructor.) Will meet 
at CTU. 
Osiek T 1-4:45 Winter 



62 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 



MTS B-505 

New Testament Ethics 

Course will focus on methods and proposals for 
deriving ethics from the New Testament. Em- 
phasis will fall on concrete ways of living out of 
God's relationship with humanity /world as re- 
flected in Gospels, Acts, Pauline Epistles and 
Hebrews. 
Brawley F 9-11:50 Winter 

NBTS NT 453 

New Testament Ethics 

This course is a study in Christian ethical re- 
flection based on the New Testament. It com- 
bines exegesis with constructive theology and 
ethics. Prereq: 2 New Testament courses. 
Cos grove T 9-1:30 Winter 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 



cal resources for studying the New Testament 
in its original language. Credit only upon 
completion of B-325. 
Tamer TF 10-11:50 Winter 

MTS B-324H 

Introduction al Griego del Nuevo Testamento I 
(Introduction to New Testament Greek I) 

(For course description see MTS B-324 above.) 
Cortes-Fuentes TTh 6-7:50 p.m. Winter 

NPTS BIBL-099 

Beginning New Testament Greek II 

(For course description see Fall NPTS BIBL-098.) 
Katter M(T)WTh 2:15-3:30 Winter 

NPTS BIBL-113 

New Testament Greek Readings 

(For course description see Fall NPTS BIBL-1 12.) 
Belleville TBA Winter 



CTU B321 
Biblical Greek II 

A continuation of B 320, introduction to the 
grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Tes- 
tament. Students will begin to read portions of 
the New Testament text in Greek with intro- 
ductory attention to exegesis. 
Bowe/Lenchak TWTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 



S-WTS 02-523GS 
Elementary Greek 

An intensive introduction to the grammar, vo- 
cabulary and translation of the Greek language 
as it is employed in the New Testament and early 
Christian texts. 
Pervo Jan. 3- Mar. 15 M-Th 3-3:50 Winter 



G-ETS 12-642 
Elementary Greek II 

Essential forms and principles of New Testa- 
ment Greek. Course continues and completes 
sequence begun in 12-641. 
Groh Jan. 29- Mar. 22 Winter 

M 5:30-7:10 p.m.; TTh 3:30-5:10 

LSTC B-308 
Biblical Greek II 

A continuation of Biblical Greek I. Completion 
of Greek grammar. Extensive reading in New 
Testament texts. 
Rossing MTh 10:45-12 Winter 

MTS B-324 

Introduction to New Testament Greek I 

The first part of a non-divisible two-quarter se- 
quence. An introduction to the principles of 
Greek grammar and vocabulary and to exegeti- 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS CH345 

History of Christian Thought II 

From the Reformation through the 20th century. 
A survey of significant theological movements, 
with attention to their social context. (This 
course may be elected independently of History 
of Christian Thought I.) 
TBA TBA Winter 

CTU H300 

History of Early Christianity 

The Christian movement to Chalcedon. Chris- 
tian self-identification vis-a-vis the non-Chris- 
tian world, developing institutional church struc- 
tures and practice, theological and doctrinal 
developments. 
Madigan T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 



63 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 



GETS 13-502w 
History of Christianity II 

Major issues, ideas, events and persons in the 
history of the Church from the 11th century 
through the 1 7th century; emphasis on late medi- 
eval Christianity and origins of Protestantism. L 
Stein Jan. 29-Mar. 22 TTh 1-3:20 Winter 
Stein MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

LSTC H-330 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and modern 
church history outside America, designed to show 
in broad perspective the movements which have 
shaped world Christianity in our time. Lectures 
and discussion of selected source readings. 
Hendel MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

LSTC H-331 

Reformation — Orthodoxy — Pietism 

A survey of European church history from 1 500 

to 1750, permitting more thorough study of the 

Reformation in its multiple expressions than in 

the course H-330. The age of Orthodoxy and 

continental Pietism will also receive significant 

attention. 

Killinger MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

NPTS HIST-111 

Christian Heritage II: The Modern Church 

An introduction to the history of the Christian 
church is continued in this study from the Ref- 
ormation to the present. Special attention given 
the institutional and theological diversity of the 
modern church in its cultural settings. 4 hours. 
Graham MWTh 10:15-11:30 Winter 

II. HISTORY OF 
PARTICULAR TRADITIONS 

CTU H313 

From Trent to Vatican II 

Key issues in Catholicism of the last four cen- 
turies: the mentality following the Reformation, 
Jansenism, an introduction to Newman and the 
Oxford Movement, forces influencing Vatican 
I, Modernism and its reaction, pertinent prob- 
lems of the 20th century. 
Madigan MW 1-2:15 Winter 



CTU H430 

Vatican II and the Post-Vatican Church 

Part one of the course concentrates on the is- 
sues of Vatican II: liturgy, collegiality, laity, re- 
ligious life, ecumenism and religious liberty, 
revelation. The second part examines key is- 
sues in the modern church to see if Vatican II 
responds to them. 
Ross W 2-4:45 Winter 

LSTC H-485H 

Historia de la iglesia hispana 

en los E.E.U.U. y el Caribe 

(History of the Hispanic Church 

in the United States and the Caribbean) 

El curso introducira al alumno a los origenes 
desarrollo y estado actual de las iglesias hispanas 
en los E.E.U.U. Se pondra enfasis en el tipo de 
teologia, asi como las distintas eclesiologias que 
le han dado concretion historica. 
Cassese M 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

MS HI488 

Modernist Crisis in the Catholic Church 

Examines the effects of papal condemnation of 
Modernism (cf. Pius X in his 1907 encyclical 
Pascendi Gregis) on the Church as a whole and 
upon our American Church. Were the Modern- 
ists in fact heretics or simply religious thinkers 
ahead of their time? 
Sorvillo T 2:40-5 Winter 

MTS H-330 

History of the Black Church in North 
America 

Study of the major issues and events in the de- 
velopment of the Black Church from the sla- 
very era to the present, with particular focus on 
folk religion, protest movements, theological 
developments and ecclesial expressions. 
Daniels T 6:30-9:50 p.m. Winter 

MTS H/T-402 
Reformed Tradition 

This course explores the history and theology of 
the Reformed tradition with a view to under- 
standing its origins and development and its 
contemporary manifestations and relevance. 
Sawyer/Case-Winters MW 2-3:50 Winter 



64 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



NBTS CHTH401 
Baptist Identity 

Study of Baptist history and confessions of faith to 
explore the convictions and forms in which Baptists 
have expressed their socio-cultural, theological and 
ecclesial identity, Contemporary expressions of Bap- 
tist identity will also be considered. 
Sharp W 6: 30- 10 p.m. Winter 

III. HISTORY — INDIVIDUALS 

LSTC H-612 

Luther and Social Reform 

A seminar which focuses on the theological and 
practical aspects of Luther's social thought. 
Readings and discussions of primary sources 
dealing with such issues as the care of the poor, 
education, authority, marriage and war. P 
Hendel T 8:30-9:45; 10:45-12 Winter 

NPTS HSTX-135 

Theology of Luther 

This seminar examines through reading, research 
and discussion selected treatises of Luther with 
particular reference to major doctrinal themes of 
the Reformation set in their historical context. 
P.Anderson Jan. 2-12 8:30-12:30 Winter 



V. SELECT TOPICS 
IN CHURCH HISTORY 

CTU BH504x 

Apostolic Fathers 

(For course description see New Testament III.) 
Osiek T 2-4:45 Winter 

G-ETS 13-606 

History of Christian Thought: 

Origen's De Principiis 

Study of the development of Christian thought 
either in relation to a doctrinal issue or to a pe- 
riod in church history. 
Groh F 8:30-12 + 1 TBA Winter 

LSTC H-460 

A History of the Relationships 

between Art and Religion 

An overview of the history of religious expres- 
sion in visual art, discussing a wide range of 
religious beliefs but focusing on Christianity 
(early church to present). Discussion of the ef- 
fect historical models have on worship space and 
practice. 

Caemmerer February 12- March 7 Winter 
MTTh 7-9:50 p.m. 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY 

G-ETS 13-672 

Religion in a Culturally Diverse United States 

Seminar exploring the historical record of ways 
in which people in communities of faith some- 
times appropriated and sometimes resisted their 
society's cultural diversity. Case studies related 
to race, ethnicity and gender suggest larger so- 
cial paradigms. L 

Keller/Barton Jan. 29- Mar. 22 Winter 

F 8:30-12 + 1 TBA 

LSTC H-350B 

American Lutheran Church History 

A course focusing on Lutheranism in the United 
States and especially on the problem of unity and 
polarization among the various Lutheran traditions. 
The historical development is viewed against the 
broad background of Christianity in America, 
Jiirisson MW 1-2:15 Winter 



MS HI316 

Fathers and Mothers of the Desert 

Examines the rise of Christian monasticism in 
the fourth and fifth centuries. Considers the his- 
torical context of monasticism. Examines its 
theological content primarily through primary 
writings. Assesses its impact on the Church's 
life and spirituality. 
Hennessey TF 9:55-11:15 Winter 



THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

CTS CH345x 

History of Christian Thought II 

(For course description see Historical Studies I.) 
TBA TBA Winter 



65 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



G-ETS 2 1-501 w 
Systematic Theology I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Will Jan. 29-Mar. 22 

W 9-10:50; F 9-11:50 



Winter 



G-ETS 21-502w 
Systematic Theology II 

Christian understanding of Jesus the Christ, sal- 
vation, the Holy Spirit, church ministry and sac- 
raments. Prereq: 21-501 or equiv. L 

Young Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

TTh 8:30-10:50 
Will MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-312 
Christian Theology II 

For description of the Christian Theology se- 
quence see LSTC T-31 1, Christian Theology I 
(Fall). The second course in the sequence deals 
with the human condition (including sin and 
evil) and the Person and Work of Christ. 
Hefner MW 1-2:15 Winter 

+ disc. sec. W 2:20-3:10 
Westhelle MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

MTS T-300 

Introduction to Christian Theology 

Introduction to contents, methods and resources 
of coherent and responsible Christian thinking. 
Attention to understanding and interpreting ba- 
sic Christian doctrines. 
Case-Winters/Rivera M 6-8:50 p.m. Winter 

NBTS IN 311 

Evangelism, Salvation and Social Justice 

This "introductory integrative course" introduces 
theological education by exploring a conflicted 
issue in the church: the relation of evangelism 
and the search for social justice. L 
Dayton M 6:30-10 p.m. Winter 

NPTS THEO-301 
Systematic Theology II 

The foundation of human existence, salvation 
and hope in the triune God whose work is cre- 
ation, redemption and sanctification. 4 hours. 
Weborg MWTh(F) 8-9:15 Winter 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

CTU CD465H 

Teologia del ministerio en la comunidad 
hispana 

Se investigan las raices teologicas e historicas 
del ministerio ordenado y laico en la Tradition 
catolica, y estas se ponen en dialogo con el 
contexto actual de la comunidad hispana catolica 
de los EEUU. 
Riebe-Estrella W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU D444 

Priesthood in the Roman Catholic Tradition 

A study of the origins of ordained ministry in 
the early church, its gradual transformation as 
the church becomes a political power, its refor- 
mation in the 16th century, its image from the 
17th to the 20th century and its renewal at 
Vatican Council II. 
Bevans TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU D519 

Theology of John Henry Newman 

This seminar examines Newman's developing 
theology of the church in his Lectures on the Pro- 
phetical Office of the Church, Apologia pro Vita 
Sua, On Consulting the Faithful in Matters of 
Doctrine and Letter to the Duke of Norfolk. 
Linnan M 10-12:45 Winter 

CTU DCS575x 
Black Spirituality 

(For course description see Ministry Studies II.) 
Phelps T 3:30-6:15 Winter 

LSTC T-434 

Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

An in-depth analysis of the theology and praxis 
of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., wrestling with 
the philosophical and theological principles he 
employed and their relevance in today's theo- 
logical marketplace. 
Pero MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

LSTC T-436/NPTS THEO-174 
Studies in Bonhoeffer 

An intensive study/reflection on three texts from 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer: The Cost of Discipleship, 



66 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



Life Together and Letters and Papers from Prison. 
Newly-translated and updated versions of the text 
will be used, as available. Meets at LSTC. 
Nelson/Bliese W 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

LSTC T-515 
Theology of the Cross 

An examination of Luther's rediscovery of the 
centrality of the cross in Paul's theology and the 
contemporary articulations of a theology of the 
cross, with particular attention given to the re- 
lationship between atonement and power. 
Westhelle MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

LSTC T-602 

Graduate Theological Seminar: 

Ritschel and Harnack 

Considers the theologies of the two most promi- 
nent liberal theologians of the latter third of 19th 
century Germany. Themes: historical, moral and 
constructive theology; Neo-Kantianism, as well 
as the social and political implications of their 
thought. 
Busse T 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 



M/L TS322w 

Literature for Liberal Religion: 
Liberal Religious Texts 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Shadleetal. Jan. 15-19 9-5 



M/L TS336w 

Theologies of the Liberal Churches 

(For course description see Fall.) 



Evison et al. 



Jan. 8-12 9-5 



Winter 



Winter 



MTS T-422 

Church and the World: 

A Study in H. Richard Niebuhr 

A critical examination of the theological and 
ethical method of H. Richard Niebuhr with spe- 
cial attention to his constructive proposal on the 
relation of church and world. Class will read 
his major works and diverse biographical stud- 
ies of Niebuhr. 
Chun M 9-11:50 Winter 

MTS T-441K 

Immigrant Theology and Ministry 

(Taught in Korean) 

Central questions are: What is God doing in and 



through these immigrants in their context? What 
is the ministry with and of these immigrant 
Christians? Class will attempt to discover new 
meanings of the biblical faith within our par- 
ticular context. 
Kang Feb. 5-9 TBA Winter 

MTS T/H-402 
Reformed Tradition 

(For course description see MTS H/T 402 in 

Historical Studies II.) 

Case-Winters/Sawyer MW 2-3:50 Winter 

NBTS TH432 

Theological Concepts in the Literature of 

African American Experience 

This course seeks to identify African-American 
dimensions of certain theological concepts com- 
municated through the medium of African- 
American literature. L 
Butler Th 6:30-10 p.m. Winter 

NPTS HSTX-135x 

Theology of Luther 

(For course description see Historical Studies III.) 
P. Anderson Jan. 2-12 8:30-12:30 Winter 

TEDS ST772 
Kierkegaard 

An in-depth consideration of the philosophy of 
Kierkegaard, studying the background of his life, 
presenting the major ideas of his thought through 
reading and interaction with his works, demonstrat- 
ing why he is one of the fathers of existentialism. 
J. Feinberg TBA Winter 

III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTS TEC 499 

Homosexuality and Christian Faith 

An examination of the issues raised in the con- 
temporary church debate concerning homosexu- 
ality with special attention to theological and 
ethical questions and an attempt to develop a 
constructive response. 
Jennings T 9-12:40 Winter 

CTS TEC 605 

Twentieth Century Theology 

Seminar for advanced degree students covering 



67 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



significant developments in theology in the twen- 
tieth century. Focus on the emergence of new 
voices and the theological precedents for them. 
Thistle thwaite Th 9-12:40 Winter 

CTU CD445x 

Toward a Hispanic Theology of Church 

(Tor course description see World Mission Studies.) 
Riebe-Estrella MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 



G-ETS 21-605 
Constructive Theology 

Use of studies in biblical, historical and con- 
temporary theology in formulating one's own 
understanding of major Christian doctrines. 
Prereq: one foundational course each in Bible, 
history and theology. L 

Young Jan. 29-Mar.22 Winter 

T 6-9:30 p.m. + 1 TBA 



CTU D440 
Christology 

A study of the foundational questions of 
Christology in the light of the critical, histori- 
cal study of the Scripture and the theological 
tradition. 
Hayes MW 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU D445 

Theology of the Church and its Ministry 

A theology of the church and its ministry in the 
light of their historical development from semi- 
nal beginnings in the apostolic age to various 
syntheses offered by post- Vatican II theologians. 
Linnan TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU DC441 
Christology and Cultures 

A study of how the confession of Jesus Christ 
interacts with cultural processes. Special at- 
tention is given to the New Testament and 
Patristic periods and also to contemporary move- 
ments in the world church today. 
Schreiter TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU DC448 

Marian Theology, Symbols and Inculturation 

Faith can only be expressed in the symbols of 
differing ages and cultures. Mary of the Gospel 
and tradition must be understood in our situa- 
tion. This course studies traditional and present 
symbols of the faithful. 
Brennan TTh 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU DC605 

Constructing Local Theologies 

A seminar exploring various factors influenc- 
ing the development of theology in different 
cultural contexts. 
Schreiter M 1-3:45 Winter 



GETS 21-625 
Theology of Holy Spirit 

The person of the Holy Spirit. Survey of rel- 
evant biblical passages in the Old Testament, 
Synoptics, John's Gospel, Acts and Pauline 
Epistles and historical developments in the life 
of the Church. How to build a personal theol- 
ogy of the Spirit. 
Tuttle W 9-10:50: F 9-11:50 Winter 

GETS 21-638 

Theology and Literature: Suffering and Evil 

The worlds presented by major literary works 
offer complexities of thought and context that 
enrich our understandings of theological issues. 
We will investigate the creative interaction be- 
tween text and meaning. L 
S. Vaux Jan. 8-19 Winter 

MF 8-12; TWTh8-ll 

LSTC T-429 

The Connection Between the Human 

Cultural Situation and Christology 

The course examines from a Lutheran perspec- 
tive the theological meaning of the human cul- 
tural situation and the Christology of contem- 
porary theological writings. It will also define 
the connection between Christ and culture in 
our world. 
Pero TTh 10:45-12 Winter 

LSTC T-456 

The Epic of Creation: Scientific and 

Religious Perspectives on our Origins 

The scientific story of the origin and evolution of the 
universe, life and humans; Ancient Near Eastern and 
Greco-Roman concepts of creation and creation sto- 
ries and themes from the Old and New Testaments 
and theological interpretations of the stories. 
Gilbert M 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 



68 



ETHICAL STUDIES 



LSTC T-603 

Graduate Theological Seminar: 

Concepts and Methods 

For graduate students in Christian theology. The 
emphasis is on methodology, introducing basic 
concepts and issues that will help students clarify 
their own methodological styles. P 
Hefner T 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 



political theologies. Focus on such systems as 

liberation theology, black theology and feminist 

theology. 

Fields TEA Winter 

ETHICAL STUDIES 

I. MORAL THEOLOGY 



MS SY468 

Scriptures of the World's Religious 

Explores religious texts from Hinduism, Bud- 
dhism, Taoism, Islam and religious traditions 
of North America in relation to the Jewish and 
Christian Scriptures. Texts include selections 
from the Rig-Veda, Upanishads, the Bhagavad 
Gita. the Qur'an et al. 
Lefebure/Schoenstene MTh 2:40-4 Winter 

MTS T-510 

Seminar: Believing in God 

What does it mean to believe in God? Seminar ex- 
plores experiences of God and teachings about God 
in Christian community. Attention to ways teach- 
ings reflect faith experiences and are challenged 
byother positions. Prereq: T-300 or equiv. L 
Parker Th 9-11:50 Winter 

S-WTS 16-502S 
Theological Bibliography 

A systematic examination of bibliographies in 
biblical studies, church history, liturgies and 
pastoral ministry. Attention will be given to 
classification and subject headings in theologi- 
cal libraries. One half unit. 
Smith Jan. 30-Mar. 15 TTh 3-4:30 Winter 

SCUPE B-TH302 

Urban Principalities and the Spirit of the City 

Drawing from recent theological work on the 
biblical language of power, this course will seek 
to get at the city, its systems and ministries by 
way of an understanding of the 'principalities 
and powers. ' 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 1 9. 
Kellermann T a.m. Winter 

TEDS ST738 
Political Theologies 

A course designed to clarify what constitutes a 
"political theology" and to investigate the bib- 
lical and theological bases of representative 



CTU E370w 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Wadell M 7-9:45 p.m. 



Winter 



G-ETS 22-502 

The Church and Social Systems 

Outline of stances taken by churches toward 
society in different contexts. Types of social sys- 
tems, e.g., patriarchy, racism, liberal democracy. 
Formulation of ethical principles for Christian 
relations to these social systems and models for 
ministry. L 

Ruether Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

TTh 3:30-5:30 

LSTC E-310w 
Christian Ethics 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Hutter TTh 3:50-5:05 Winter 



II. SELECT TOPICS IN ETHICS 

CTS TEC 423 

Black Theological Ethics II - Human Sexuality 

This course will help students to develop an ethi- 
cal framework for dealing with issues of human 
sexuality as they affect the African American com- 
munity. Topics will include sex education, teen- 
age pregnancy, homosexuality and abortion. L P 
Matthews T 2-5 Winter 

CTU E432 

Ethical Implications of the Holocaust/Genocide 

Examines the annihilation of the Jews as well 
as the slaughter of the incapacitated, the Gyp- 
sies, the Poles, gay persons and others in WWII 
and considers the churches' ethical responses 
during that period; also treats the broader is- 
sues of genocide. 
Pawlikowski T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 



69 



ETHICAL STUDIES 



CTU E470 

Formation of Conscience 

A study of the various levels of conscience in 
relation in decision-making. Students will be 
expected to examine their own development of 
conscience and the decicsion-making process 
and their implications for ministry. 
Nairn Intensive Winter 

Jan. 13. 27; Feb. 10; Mar. 2 

CTU E585 

The Social Responsibility of the Church 

This course will examine how the church's re- 
sponsibility to society has been understood by 
writers such as Walter Rauschenbusch. Reinhold 
Niebuhr. Dorothy Day and others. 
Wade 11 T 1-3:45 Winter 



ting-edge discussions of contemporary Christian 
ethics: the recovery of the virtues and commu- 
nity for Christian life. Readings will focus on 
the work of Stanley Hauerwas, but will also in- 
clude others. 
Flutter W 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

MS M0319(M-5) 
Business Ethics 

The business world puts great emphasis on the 

unrestrained right of individuals and business 

to pursue their own economic self-interest. This 

course considers these principles, values and 

practices in the light of Christian values and 

principles. 

Boyle TF 1:15-2:35 Winter 



CTU EC545 

Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience 

Explores relation of Christian life to political 
life, investigating the origin and role of con- 
science in both. Relates conscience to histori- 
cal realities of community and traditions and to 
the unity of theory and practice proper to politi- 
cal conscience. 
Fornasari T ~ -9: 45 p.m. Winter 

G-ETS 22-643 

Technology, War and Religion 

Examines conflicts in the modern world involv- 
ing technological, military and economic power 
in the light of theological ethics. Particular fo- 
cus on those domestic and global conflicts where 
religion undergirds ideology, antagonism and 
reconciliation. 

K. Vaux Jan. 8-19 Winter 

MF 8-12; TWTh 8-11 

LSTC E-432/MTS E-424 

Greening the Church 

This course employs Chicago resources to pro- 
vide environmental training for pastoral leader- 
ship — ecological updates, creation theology, lit- 
urgy, ethics, education and other practical sug- 
gestions for parish transformation. 
Hadsell/Rhoads M 6-8:50 p.m. Winter 

LSTC E-515 

Character, Community and the Christian Life 

An ecumenical exploration of one of the cut- 



MS M0336 

Ethics of Social Communication 

An examination of the Church's teachings and 
reflections in the area of social communications. 
The influence of mass media and the pressures 
placed upon human freedom. The right to know 
confronts the right to privacy. 
Listeria MTh 2:40-4 Winter 

MTS E/M-301 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

Readings, case studies, projects, etc. develop 
understanding of and capacities for public min- 
istry. Emphasis on role of church, analysis of 
public issues and theological/ethical resources. 
Students plan, carry out and evaluate action on 
a public issue. 
Livezey F 9-11:50 Winter 

MTS M-430x 

Ethical Issues in Parish Ministry 

(For course description see Ministry Studies I.) 
Hindman T 9-11:50 Winter 

NPTS THEO-172 

Medical Ethics 

Several key issues, e.g., abortion, euthanasia, 
human experimentation, transplants, genetic 
engineering, access to health care and wholistic 
treatments, are examined in this course in con- 
sultation with physicians, pastors and other re- 
source persons. 
Nelson W 7-10 p.m. Winter 



70 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 



S-WTS 08-603S 
Problems in Ethics 

Focusing on specific moral problems, moral ar- 
guments will be evaluated, including assess- 
ments of theological assumptions, practical 
moral reasoning, use of technical data and un- 
derstandings of the task of the church. 
Sedgwick Jan. 30-Mar. 15 Winter 

M-Th 1-2:30 

RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 

CTS CM 488 

Work, Love and Family in American Culture 

A seminar on patterns and images of work, love 
and family. Investigates changes and problems 
and a variety of responses. 
Miller -McLemore M 2-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 433 

Introduction to the Black Church 

and the Study of African American Religion 

The course will help students to develop an un- 
derstanding of critical issues facing the black 
church and African American communities and 
to become familiar with methodological issues 
in this field. 
Matthews M 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 

CTU E585x 

The Social Responsibility of the Church 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Wadell T 1-3:45 Winter 

CTU EC425 

World Poverty, Development 

and Life's Liberation 

Investigates and assesses the world's division 
into rich and poor countries. Studies poverty, 
development and liberation in the light of Scrip- 
ture and Catholic social teaching, using today's 
kairos for Christian communities as focus. 
Fornasari MW 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU EC545x 

Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Fornasari T 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 



G-ETS 22-504 

Church and Community 

Analyzes local churches' interaction with their 
communities in city, suburb and small town as 
basis for ministry in evangelism, counseling, 
social service and action for social change. 
Theological options, use of social theory and 
data, case studies. L 

Tholin Jan. 8-19 Winter 

MF 8-12; TWTh 8-11 

LSTC M-370w 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Perry Th 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

MS M0336x 

Ethics of Social Communication 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Listecki MTh 2:40-4 Winter 

SCUPE M300 
January Term in Chicago 

Designed to integrate an academic understanding of 
urban systems with the practical experience of liv- 
ing within an ethnic community affected by such sys- 
tems. Students will live and work in an ethnic neigh- 
borhood. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
McGibbon Jan. 8-20 Winter 

TEDS ME845 

Leadership in the Urban Church 

The emphasis in this course is not so much on 
the internal leadership structure of the local ur- 
ban church as it is on responsive leadership in 
the church to its urban context. 
Loritts Jan. 16-25 Intensive Winter 

WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 

CTU BC490 

Biblical Foundations for Mission 

The attitude of the biblical communities to the 
non-biblical world will be investigated for di- 
rection in the global mission of the contempo- 
rary church. Material from both of the Testa- 
ments will be studied. 
Lenchak TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 



71 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 



CTU C575w 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Schroeder W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU CD445 

Toward a Hispanic Theology of Church 

Students are invited to place the praxis of a con- 
crete Latino ecclesial community in dialogue 
with the main themes about church in the Tra- 
dition, returning in their project to the question 
of pastoral strategies. 
Riebe-Estrella MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU CD465Hx 

Teologia del ministerio 
en la comunidad hispana 

(For course description see Theological Studies II.) 
Riebe-Estrella W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU DC605x 

Constructing Local Theologies 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Schreiter M 1-3:45 Winter 

CTU/MTS C460w 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Doidge/Schroeder M 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

LSTC W-427 

Christian Mission 

in Ecumenical and Multi-Faith Contexts 

Examines challenges facing the global and ecu- 
menical church in all six continents arising from 
the missionary movement, its life, growth, wit- 
ness and present situation, giving special atten- 
tion to churches living in multi-faith areas seek- 
ing to witness. 
Scherer/Vogelaar W 2:30-5 Winter 

MS MS330 

Inculturation, Evangelization 

and Hispanic Popular Religiosity 

An exploration into the important role the popu- 
lar religion of Hispanics plays in the evangeli- 
zation of these peoples. Includes practical pas- 
toral applications that can lead to successful 
inculturation of our faith in the Hispanic real- 
ity. L 
Mendez W 8:25-11:15 Winter 



MS PI392 
Cross-Cultural Ministry 

This course is intended for students whose life 
experience, theological education and/or min- 
istry bridge two cultures. Students will exam- 
ine the connections between theology, culture 
and pastoral practice of their cultures of origin 
and of ministry. 
Folliard W 8:25-11:15 Winter 

NPTS MNST-151 

Cultural Dimensions in Missions 

Insights from social sciences are applied to the 
missionary task of the church. Advocacy and 
contextualization of the gospel in various cul- 
tures are studied. 4 hours. 
Weld W 7-10 p.m. Winter 

NPTS MNST-153 

The Christian Confrontation 

with World Religions 

This class will seek understanding of similari- 
ties and distinctives of the world religions. The 
emphasis is on dialogue between the Christian 
and the non-Christian as persons. 
Weld Th 2-5 Winter 

HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 

LSTC W-429 
World Religions 

A phenomenological study of world religions 
with particular attention to History of Religions 
perspectives. An additional emphasis will be 
placed on the problem of conflict and reconcili- 
ation between different faiths. Meets at ELCA, 
8765 W. Higgins Road. 
Lindberg Th 6-9 p.m. Winter 

LSTC W-530 

History of the Development of Religious 

Thought in Islam 

Schisms in Islam caused Muslim thinkers to ask: 
What is Islam? Who is a Muslim? Can God be 
limited? The class will explore some of these 
historic, intellectual and theological movements 
within Islam. 
Vogelaar TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 



72 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



LSTC W-531 

The Qur'an and its Interpreters 

To understand the Qur'an one must use the sci- 
ences developed for its interpretation. This 
course will introduce these sciences and dem- 
onstrate ways in which the Qur'an has been a 
guide for Muslims for the last fourteen centu- 
ries. 
Aasi TTh 10:45-12 Winter 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

CTS CM 300 

The Practice of Christian Ministry 

A course to assist the student in experiencing 
and initiating a style of pastoral and theological 
reflection; to provide the student with perspec- 
tive on the nature, history and practice of min- 
istry in Christian vocation. P 
Edgerton W 6:30-9:30 p.m. Winter 

CTU M409w 
Ministry on the Margins 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Staff TBA Winter 

G-ETS 34-506 
Pastor and People 

Roles and responsiblities of the pastor, grounded in 
a theology of the church and ministry. Congrega- 
tional analysis and empowerment; issues of pastoral 
identity, authority, spirituality and leadership. Prac- 
tical guidance for various situations. L 
Wingeier Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

TTh 1-3:20 

G-ETS 34-610 
Introduction to Evangelism 

The gospel and its transmission in the New Tes- 
tament and early Church history. Informal con- 
temporary patterns of personal and corporate 
evangelism, including specific strategies for 
communicating Christian faith in today's world. 
Tuttle Jan. 29-Mar. 22 

Th 6-9:30 p.m. + 1 TBA Winter 



GETS 34-676 

Chicago — An Asian Immersion Experience 

This immersion intensive will explore issues of 
Christian ministry through felt needs, their com- 
munity dynamics and their religous and cultural 
heritage. 

Codman-Wilson Jan. 8-26 Winter 

Th 9-11; F 10-12; Sa 10-4; Sun 9-9 

LSTC M-500 
Mission Leadership 

This course provides training in specific minis- 
terial skills, such as evangelism, stewardship, 
conflict resolution and ministry in daily life. 
Theological reflection on these skills and on 
modes of leadership in the pastoral office. 
Bliese/TBA T 1-3:30 Winter 

Conrad Th 1:3:30 Winter 



M/L M360w 
Aesthetics/Arts in Ministry 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Tolley Jan. 8-12 9-5 



M/L M413w 

Leadership Theory and Practice 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Bishop Jan. 15-19 9-5 



Winter 



Winter 



MTS M-315K 

Ministry to Young Adults (Taught in Korean) 

A socio-cultural exegesis of today's young adult- 
hood from a multi-cultural perspective and a 
reflection on how the church can minister to 
them effectively. 
Cha M 6-8:50 p.m. Winter 

MTS M-349Kx 

Transformation through Care: Evangelism 

and Membership Care (Taught in Korean) 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Han W 9-11:50 Winter 

MTS M-430 

Ethical Issues in Parish Ministry 

Course designed to generate discussion of ethi- 
cal dimensions of parish ministry, including 
theological analysis of ministry events. Personal 
sharing encouraged. 
Hindman T 9-11:50 Winter 



73 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



MTS M-437 

Managing Church Conflicts 

Intensive in three time blocks. First involves 
process for managing church conflicts; second 
uses videotape to practice assertive management 
plans; third is for clarifying remaining concerns. 
Halverstadt Intensive Winter 

Jan. 5-6; Feb. 2-3 F 1:30-9; Sa 9-4 
Mar. 1 1-6 

MTS M/E-301 

Introduction to Public Ministry 

(For course description see MTS E/M-301 in 

Ethical Studies II.) 

Livezey F 9-11:50 Winter 

NPTS MNST-161 
Contemporary Evangelism: 
Methods and Resources 

Designed for the student who is or will soon be 
pastor of a local church. Tools for evangelism 
are presented by guest practitioners who have 
effectively used them. The class then probes 
behind the tools for the theory and theology. 
Collins Jan. 2-12 8:30-12:30 Winter 

NPTS MNST-360 

Evangelism and Church Growth 

This course introduces the student to basic com- 
ponents in growing a church. The perspectives 
and approaches of the church growth movement 
are studied. 
Reed MWTh 11:40-12:55 Winter 

SCUPE M305 

Dimensions and Dynamics of Ministry 

Focuses on transformative leadership and ex- 
amines what distinguishes effective ministry 
leaders from ineffective. Opportunity for stu- 
dents to develop leadership potential in an area 
that calls for transformation. 4 hours. Fees may 
apply; see p. 19. 
Frenchak M p.m. Winter 

II. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTS TEC462x 
Sexuality and the Sacred 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Miller-McLemore Th 9-12:40 Winter 



CTU DCS575 
Black Spirituality 

This seminar will engage students in a critical 
examination of the African roots, development 
and characteristics of the spirituality of African 
Americans forged in the redemptive suffering 
of slavery and black life in the United States. 
Phelps ' T 3:30-6:15 Winter 

CTU S414 

Theology and Practice of Prayer 

With the "dwelling places" of Teresa of Avila 
as a guide, this course offers the student a theo- 
logical and practical introduction to the Chris- 
tian life of prayer. 
Frohlich W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU S521 

Significant Figures in Spirituality 

Explores the various ways in which Christian 
spirituality has been understood by examining 
the models of discipleship presented in classic 
spiritual writers and movements. 
TBA W 10-12:45 Winter 

CTU S610 

Theories of Psycho/Spiritual Development 

From a theological basis, students engage in an 
examination and critique of several of the lead- 
ing models of psycho/spiritual development (in- 
cluding neo-Freudian, Jungian, structural-devel- 
opmental and transpersonal.) 
Frohlich T 1-3:45 Winter 



CTU SB480x 

Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

(For course description see Biblical Studies General.) 
Bowe TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 



GETS 13-615 

The Sacraments and Spiritual Formation 

Study of the theological interpretation of bap- 
tism and the Lord's Supper in the church's past; 
focus on the sacramental life as a resource for 
the spiritual formation of contemporary Chris- 
tians. Prereq: 13-501, 502 or 503 or equiv. L 
Stein Jan. 2 9- Mar. 22 Winter 

TTh 8:30-10:50 



74 



M/L I300w 

Spiritual Journey Workshop 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Gerdes T 4-5:30 



Winter 



M/L 1343 

Spirituality in African American Literature 

A study in the various forms of spirituality pro- 
duced in African American literature. The works 
are considered both in the context of the his- 
torical and social conditions of their day as well 
as the spiritual essence/significance for then and 
now. 
Bent ley W 4-6:30 Winter 

NBTS MN405 

The Prayers of God's People 

Study of the prayers in the Scriptures with em- 
phasis on theological themes, literary and artis- 
tic expressions and dynamic qualities, as well 
as of prayers of peoples from different races, 
cultures and eras in order to give expression to 
personal prayer. 
Maine Hi Jan. 15-19 9-4 Winter J-Term 

NPTS MNST-101 

Spiritual Formation I: Spiritual Journey 

The spiritual life grows by direction and disci- 
pline. The journal, prayer life, devotional read- 
ing, time management and simplicity are modes 
of discipline and direction which are examined 
in this course. 1 hour. 
Weborg T 8-9:50 Winter 

NPTS MNST-201 
Spiritual Formation IV: 
Becoming a Spiritual Director 

Spiritual direction is the art and science of being 
a soul-friend in which particular attention is given 
to the discernment and following of God's provi- 
dential care in one's life. Includes individual ses- 
sions with a spiritual director. 1 hour. 
Weborg/Koonce/Carlson TEA Winter 

S-WTS 06-50 IS 
Spirituality for Ministry 

An introduction to types of spirituality and spiri- 
tual disciplines, resources for personal and pro- 
fessional formation and the role of spirituality 
in the practical life of the church. 
Barker Jan. 3 -Mar. 15 WF 9-10:50 Winter 



MINISTRY STUDIES 
III. PASTORAL CARE 

CTS CM 534 

Advanced Pastoral Care 

An advanced seminar in pastoral care focused 
on selected human problems of particular inter- 
est to the student, e.g., alcoholism, death and 
dying, mid-life crises, etc. Seniors, D.Min., 
Ph.D. only. 
Moore W 2-5 Winter 

CTS TEC423x 

Black Theological Ethics II— Human Sexuality 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Matthews T 2-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 462 
Sexuality and the Sacred 

A seminar examining the meaning of sexuality 
as human phenomena and as part of divine rev- 
elation. Explores methods and sources of under- 
standing, sexuality/spirituality, gender/orienta- 
tion, ethical and parish issues. 
Milier-McLemore Th 9-12:40 Winter 

CTU MP360w 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Anderson MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU MP408 

Ministry with the Dying and Grieving 

An examination of 1) finitude as a human prob- 
lem, 2) attachment as a human necessity, and 3) 
grief as the inevitable response to a variety of 
loss experiences throughout life, in order to en- 
hance our ministering with the dying and the 
grieving. 
Anderson W 7-9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTU MP437 

Pastoral Counseling 

and the Female Counselee 

This course will explore selected concerns and 
issues presented by female counselees in pasto- 
ral care and counseling settings. It will also 
review the dynamics of the counseling relation- 
ship and strategies for response with women. 
Scanlon TTh 10-11:15 Winter 



75 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



GETS 32-501w 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Rector Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

Th 6-9:30 p.m. + I TBA 



which is both prophetic and caring in situations 
involving social controversy (e.g., abortion, hu- 
man sexuality, interracial conflict, intergenera- 
tional conflict). 
Billman T 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 



GETS 32-617 

Emotional and Spiritual Empowerment for 

Ministry 

Provides a foundation to enable transformation 
of "negative" feelings and impulses into spiri- 
tually powerful sources of motivation and 
strength by developing an informed perspective 
on, and praxis with regard to, various human 
emotions and impulses. L 
Hinkle Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

Th 6-9 p.m. + 1 TBA 

GETS 32-634 

Premarital, Marital and Family Counseling 

in Pastoral Care 

Theory and practice of pastoral counseling with 
couples and families, including those in premari- 
tal, marital, divorce and post-marital situations 
as well as counseling issues with families of 
nuclear, single parent, blended and/or extended 
composition. L 

Hogue Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

T 6-9 p.m. + 1 TBA 

LSTC M-430 

Pastoral Care with Couples in Transition 

Will explore the theology and practice of pasto- 
ral care with couples at various stages of life 
together: pre-commitment preparation, life cycle 
transitions, relational conflict, separation and/ 
or divorce, and preparation for a partner's death. 
Billman W 2:30-5:20 Winter 

LSTC M-436 

Alcoholism and Drug Abuse 

This course will deal with the dynamics of 
chemical dependency and drug abuse. Consid- 
eration will be given to etiology, 
symptomatology, intervention and after care. 
Field trips and workshops will be included. 
Christian/Crum T 9-11:50 Winter 

LSTC M-440 

Pastoral Care and Social Conflict 

This course will focus on pastoral leadership 



MTS M-310 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Course leads students toward basic understand- 
ing of meaning and practice of pastoral care and 
helps students acquire skills necessary for field 
education, clinical pastoral education and pas- 
toral ministry. L 
Ashby MW 2-3:50 Winter 

MTS M-348K 

Pastoral Counseling in the Korean Church 

(Taught in Korean) 

Goals of the course: to learn orientation of pas- 
toral care and counseling and organize issues in 
light of the Gospel using case studies in each 
issue. Designed to develop professional and 
pastoral competencies. 
Doh Post-term intensive Winter 

MTS M-349K 

Transformation through Care: Evangelism 

and Membership Care (Taught in Korean) 

Through basic understanding of evangelism and 
membership care in the local church, students 
will prepare an integrated program of evange- 
lism and new member assimilation based on the 
Reformed Faith. 
Han W 9-11:50 Winter 

NBTS PC 410 

Developing Sermons for Pastoral Care Needs 

This course will enable students to develop ways 
to respond in sermon form to pastoral care needs. 
There will be particular attention to faithful 
exegesis of Scripture and clear perceptions of 
pastoral care needs addressed. L 
Justes W 1-4:30 Winter 

NPTS MNST-125 

Ministry to Substance Abusers 

Lecture, discussion and guest presentation will 
develop a biblical, theological and psychologi- 
cal basis for the ministry of the church to those 
struggling with substance abuse. 
Jackson Evening TBA Winter 



76 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



TEDS PC611 
Psychology and Theology 

A survey of issues, theories, approaches, meth- 
ods, problems and criticisms of the integration 
of psychology and theology. Evaluations of the 
approaches of Freud, Alllport, James and more 
contemporary non-evangelical and evangelical 
writers. 
Heard TBA Winter 



GETS 31-512 
Worship and the Word 

Preparing to lead worship; relation of sermon to 
service; selection, writing and arrangement of 
worship materials; resources for the minister; bib- 
lical, historical and theological criteria for wor- 
ship and preaching. Student presentations. L 
Murphy Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

TTh 8:30-10:50 



IV. LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

CTU W355 

Sacraments: Theology and Celebration 

A basic course in sacraments to explore the hu- 
man religious experience of the faith commu- 
nity and its expressions in sacramental celebra- 
tion. The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults 
will serve as a basis for examining new sacra- 
mental models. 
Ostdiek TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU W 450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

Study of origins and development of eucharistic 
liturgy and theology with particular emphasis 
on the eucharistic prayer. Theological reflec- 
tion on its development will prepare for discus- 
sion of contemporary issues in eucharistic the- 
ology and practice. 
Foley MW 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU W 564 

Seminar in Liturgical History 

This seminar traces the history of the liturgy 
through major watershed events and key per- 
sons and movements. Students will be expected 
to participate actively in research and presenta- 
tions throughout the quarter. 
Schaab M 3:30-6:15 Winter 

CTU W652 
Language of Prayer 

This seminar will explore the ways in which liturgi- 
cal language functions in Christian worship. Stu- 
dents will examine the structure, style and content 
of various genres of liturgical prayer with particular 
attention to contemporary liturgical texts. 
Hughes W 1-3:45 Winter 



GETS 31-515 
Hymnody in Worship 

An overview and analysis of congregational song in 
the context of worship, with special attention to pat- 
terns of worship, the church year, celebration of the 
sacraments and the use of the Psalter. L 
D. Vogel Jan. 8-19 Winter 

MF 8-12; TWTh 8-11; TTh 2-4 

LSTC H-460x 

A History of the Relationships 

between Art and Religion 

(For course description see Historical Studies V.) 

Caemmerer Feb.l2-Mar. 7 Winter 

MTTh 7-9:50 p.m. 

LSTC M-380 
Worship 

A focus on pastoral and presidential leadership 
of the Lutheran lliturgy; liturgical theology, over- 
view of Christian worship, the arts and music 
in the liturgy, communication skills and plan- 
ning for worship. 
Bangert MW 1-2:15 Winter 

+ disc. sec. Th 1-1:50 
Bangert MW 7-8:45 p.m. Winter 



V. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

CTU MW450w 

Introduction to Liturgical Preaching 

(For course description see Fall.) 



Fragomeni 



T 1-3:45 



Winter 



CTU MW453 

Preaching Feasts and Seasons 

The seasons and feasts of the liturgical year of- 
fer unique opportunities to preachers. This ad- 
vanced course offers insightful direction for stu- 



77 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



dents and imaginative images for pastoral lead- 
ers. Prereq: MW450 or equiv. L 
Fragomeni M 10-12:45 Winter 

GETS 31-501w 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Chatfield Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

MW 5:30-7:30 p.m. 

LSTC M-340 
Preaching 

The aim of the course is to help students develop 
a holistic view of preaching which does justice to 
four factors: the preacher, the listener, the mes- 
sage and the churchly context, so as to establish 
sound practice in sermon design and delivery. 



Niedenthal Th 8:30-9:45 

+ section: M 12:45-2:30 
T 8-9:45 



Jensen 





T 10:30-12:15 




W 12:45-2:30 


T 


10:45-12 


section 


■ T 1-2:45 




Th 8-9:45 




Th 10:30-12:15 



Winter 



Winter 



NBTS MN383H 

La practica de la predicacion pastoral 

(The Practice of Pastoral Preaching) 

Consideracion de fundamentos biblicos- 
teologicos y factores psicosociologicos de la 
predicacion. Estudiantes predicaran sermones 
expuestos a videograbacion, evaluacion per- 
sonal, de la clase y del profesor y su asistente. 
Prereq: MN382H o permiso del prof. 
Mottesi T 3-6:30 Winter 

NPTS MNST-138 

Public Communication Skills for Ministry 

The study and practice of basic skills in com- 
municating the Christian faith: oral interpreta- 
tion of Scripture, storytelling and speech prepa- 
ration and delivery. 
Koptak MWTh 10:15-11:30 Winter 

NPTS MNST-211 
Pastoral Preaching 

Middlers are prepared for internship and later 
ministry by developing a theology for the 
pastor's preaching task and by preparation and 
delivery of sermons for evangelism, teaching and 
the funeral. 
Noren MWTh 11:40-12:55 Winter 



LSTC M-540 

Language of Preaching: Shared Story 

A seminar to investigate the language and theo- 
logical implications of story. Readings will be 
stories. Students will share stories dealing with 
selected experiences and theological themes. 
For M.Div. seniors only. L 
Niedenthal MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

M/L M412w 
Preaching 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Alexander et al. Jan. 22-26 9-5 Winter 

MTS M-324 
Introducing Preaching 

This course brings together in acts of preaching 
the life of God's people in Scripture with the 
life of God's people today. Preparation of two 
sermons from exegesis through delivery. Taught 
by a multi-cultural preaching team. 
Wardlaw and team MW 10-11:50 Winter 



TEDS H732 

Preaching on Contemporary Problems 

Using advanced methods, sermons on personal, 
community and world problems are prepared and 
delivered. Prereq: first year homiletics course. 
Larsen TBA Winter 

VI. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

CTS CM 522 

Development Seminar: 
Erikson, Fowler, Gilligan 

Using Erikson's work as a base, this seminar 
offers a critical perspective on Fowler's Faith 
Development Theory. Carol Gilligan's work will 
be utilized. 
Myers M 9-12:40 Winter 

CTU MW464 
Sacramental Catechesis 

Addresses the complementarity between liturgy 



78 



and catechesis in such areas as initiation, rec- 
onciliation and marriage preparation. Practical 
strategies for developing programs and teach- 
ing methods to serve those being catechized pro- 
vide the focus. 
Lucinio W 1-3:45 Winter 

G-ETS 33-616 

The Aging in Church and Society 

Attitudes toward aging and older persons. In- 
troduction to gerontology; examination of gifts 
and needs that older adults bring to the church; 
evaluation of resources; development of models 
for ministries with, by and for older adults. L 
L. Vogel Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

TTh 1-3:20 

GETS 33-635 

History and Theories of Christian Education 

Examines the development of Christian religious 
education as an academic discipline and ministry 
in church and society in the 1 9th and 20th centu- 
ries and helps students formulate their own stance 
in educational ministry. Prereq: 2 courses in C.E. 
Seymour Jan. 29-Mar. 22 Winter 

T 6-9:30 p.m. + 1 TBA 

M/L M400w 

History and Philosophy of Religious 

Education 

(For course description see Fall.) 



Harlow et al. Jan. 22-26 9-5 



Winter 



MTS M-412 

African-American Religious Education 

Course explores Christian Education in the Af- 
rican-American church, focusing on curriculum 
materials. Criteria for evaluation are developed 
from writings of African- American Christian 

! education theorists. 

J Birchett Th 6-8:50 p.m. Winter 

I NPTS MNST-238 
Pastor as Educator 

The pastor is called to equip God's people for 

the work of the ministry, to build up the body of 

! Christ. Leader development and confirmation 

! will be the foci of this course. 4 hours. 

Staff MWTh(F) 10:15-11:30 Winter 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

TEDS CE675 

Ministry to Dysfunctional Families 

The study of the impact of the dysfunctional family; 
understanding and treating alcoholics and abusers, 
and dealing with issues relating to the treatment of 
adult children of dysfunctional families. 
Sell TBA Winter 



VII. POLITY AND CANON LAW 

CTS CH390A 

United Methodist Polity 

Focused in the current United Methodist Book 
of Discipline, including historical/theological 
background, this course helps students gain a 
functional knowledge of the United Methodist 
Church, its institutional structure and its forms 
of authority /power. 
TBA TBA Winter 

CTU MW422 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey and practical application of the canon 
law regulating baptism, confirmation, eucharist, 
penance, anointing of the sick and marriage. 
Neville TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

MTS M-307w 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and 

Worship in the Presbyterian Church (USA) 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Hindman Th 9-11:50 Winter 



79 



BIBLICAL STUDIES 



SPRING 1996 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

MTS B-300s 

Introduction to Biblical Studies 

(For course description see MTS B-300 Fall.) 
Campbell W 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 

MTS B/M-426 
Teaching the Bible 

(For course description see MTS M/B-426 in 

Ministry Studies VI.) 

Tanzer/Caldwell T 1-3:50 Spring 

OLD TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B300s 

Old Testament Introduction 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Hoppe T 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

LSTC B-313 
Israel's Prophets 

Exploration of Israel's prophetic literature and 
heritage, its forms, times and messages. What is 
prophetic ministry today? Regular use of Hebrew 
in close study of key passages. 
Michel T 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

Klein MTh 10:45-12 Spring 

NPTS BIBL-121 

Old Testament Faith II 

Lecture and discussion on the literature concerning 
the Monarchy and the Prophets. Emphasis is placed 
on its relationship to the Jewish and Christian tradi- 
tions. An orientation to biblical Hebrew is also in- 
cluded. Prereq: BIBL-120orequiv. 5 hours. 
Staff MWThF 8-9:15 Spring 

II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B400 
Pentateuch 

A study of the literary origins and development 
of the traditions and themes of the Pentateuch 
in light of their importance for ancient Israel's 



theology. Attention will be given to questions 

of interpretation. 

TBA MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU B410 
Early Prophecy 

A study of selected texts from pre-exilic proph- 
ets. Emphasis on the prophet's call and the rela- 
tionship of prophecy to Israel's religious tradi- 
tions and social institutions. Prereq: B 300 or 
equiv. 
Hoppe MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTU B420 
Psalms 

Studies psalms from each literary or liturgical 
category for language, form and theology. Ex- 
plores their presence in the traditions of Israel 
and the New Testament. Helpful for students 
of liturgy and spirituality. Prereq: B 300 or equiv. 
Bergant MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

G-ETS 11-603 

Prophetic Books: Jeremiah 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in Jeremiah. Emphasis on analytical and 
synthetic interpretive skills. Prereq: 11-511 or 
equiv. L 
TBA TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

G-ETS 11-607 
Psalms 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in Psalms. Emphasis on analytical and 
synthetic interpretive skills. Prereq: 11-511 or 
equiv. L 
TBA WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTC B-640 

Graduate Biblical Seminar ID: The Writings 

An ongoing seminar on materials from the third 
section of the canon: The Writings. Theme for 
1 996: Psalms and Job: An Introduction to North- 
west Semitic Studies and Hebrew Poetry. (For 
post-M.Div. students. Admission of others by 
consent of instructor.) 
Michel M 12:30-3:45 Spring 

MS BI349 

Job 

A literary and theological reading of the Book 



80 



OLD TESTAMENT 



of Job, dealing with the question of theodicy as 
posed both in the biblical book and in compara- 
tive ancient Near Eastern literature. The course 
will also examine the "Job theme" in modern 
literature. 
Schoenstene M-Th 1:15-2:35 Spring 

MTS B-406 

From David to Daniel: 

History, Literature, Theological Ferment 

Study of the Israelite and Jewish literature from 
2 Samuel to 1 Maccabees, giving in-depth atten- 
tion to representatives of each canonical division 
and literary category. Prereq: B 300 or equiv. 
Hiebert MW 8-9:50 Spring 

MTS B-415 
Jeremiah 

An exegetical and theological inquiry into the 
book of the Judean agonizing prophet of Jerusa- 
lem, 626-582 b.c.e. Knowledge of Hebrew will 
be useful, but is not required. 
Campbell F 9-11:50 Spring 

NETS BL440H 

Exegesis Biblica: Genesis (Exegesis of Genesis) 

Este curso usara textos seleccionados del 
Genesis para ensenar metodos historicos y 
literarios de la exegesis. Los/as miembros de 
la clase trabajaran en equipos para desarrollar 
sus propias exegesis de un texto especifico. 
Horning Th 2:30-5:10 Spring 

NBTS OT303 
Wisdom Literature 

An introduction to the critical, historical and 
theological study of the books of Job, Psalms, 
Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the concept of 
Wisdom in the Ancient Near East and Israel. L 
Mariottini T 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

NBTS OT453 

The Book of Micah 

An introduction to the historical and theologi- 
cal introduction to the book of Micah. Special 
attention will be given to the prophetic move- 
ment in Israel as well as the social and religious 
situation in Judah in the eighth century b.c. L 
Mariottini Th 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 



S-WTS 01-610S 

Studies in the Pentateuch: Exodus 

The formation of Israel as the covenanted people 
of God, specifically attending to the nature of 
God, the role of the human moral agent as model 
for leadership, as well as the concepts of cov- 
enant, commitment, law and ritual. 
Dee ley TTh 1-2:50 Spring 

TEDS OT845B 

Advanced Hebrew Exegesis: Isaiah 

This course will interact with recent develop- 
ments in Isaiah research and in rhetorical analy- 
sis by a careful study of Isaiah 40-48. Students 
will prepare papers for presentation in class. 
VanGemeren TBA Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

CTS CH310 

Women of the Old Testament: 

Ruth, Esther and Other Heroines 

We will be reading "unusual" books bearing 

women's names (Ruth, Esther, Judith, Susanna) 

or glorifying women (Yael, Deborah, the 

Shulammite). An investigation of womanhood 

within Israelite narrative and intertestamental 

literature. 

LaCocque T 9-12:40 Spring 

CTS CH450 

Moses, Jesus and Madison 

Explores relations between Mosaic law, also 
interpreted by the New Testament, and the U.S. 
Constitution and its applications. Emphasis on 
issues such as abortion, death penalty, separa- 
tion of church and state, desegregation, etc. 
Middlers and up. L 
LaCocque/Grossman W 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU SB629x 

Jewish Mysticism, Messianism and Spirituality 

(For course description see Ministry Studies II.) 
Perelmuter W 8:30- 11:15 Spring 

GETS 11-620 

Ancient Orient and Old Testament 

Cultural and religious institutions and literature 
of the ancient Near East (Mesopotamia, Egypt, 



81 



OLD TESTAMENT 



Canaan) and their impact on Hebrew Scriptures. 
Possible topics: stories of divine creation, par- 
allels in law codes, sacrifices and temples. 
Prereq: 11-511. 
Roth TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

NPTS BIBL-237 
Preaching Jeremiah 

Exegetical method and homiletic practice meet 
as students examine both the life and times of 
Jeremiah and the theological message of the 
prophetic book and then prepare sermons that 
reflect the diverse forms of narrative, prophetic 
oracle and lament. 
Koptak/Noren MWTh TBA Spring 

TEDS OT731 

Old Testament Theology 

Historical origins and developments of cardinal 
religious ideas of the Old Testament and the 
interrelationships of Mosaism, Prophetism and 
Wisdom are analyzed to find value and mean- 
ing for understanding the New Testament and 
the Christian message today. 
Martens TBA Spring 

IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

CTU B326 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II 

This is the second of a two-quarter course which 
studies the grammar and vocabulary of biblical 
Hebrew in order to prepare students to work with 
the Hebrew text. Prereq: B 325 or equiv. 
Hoppe MTWTh 8:30-9:30 Spring 

NPTS BIBL-104 
Intermediate Hebrew 

(For course description see Fall BIBL-102.) 
Koptak TBA Spring 



NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS CH322 

The Theologies of the New Testament 

A study of the various theologies of the New 

Testament. 

Snyder T 2-5 Spring 



CTU B305s 

New Testament Introduction 
(For course description see Fall.) 
Lenchak MW 8:30-9:45 



Spring 



G-ETS 12-502 

New Testament Interpretation: 

Romans-Revelation 

Theory and practice of exegesis of selected episto- 
lary texts, with attention to the history of early Chris- 
tianity. Exploration of the theology of Paul. Acts and 
of late New Testament writings. Lectures and ex- 
egetical sections meeting in groups. L 
Jewett Lecture: T 6-8:15 p.m. Spring 

Groups: T 8:30-10 p.m. 

W 1:30-3:20: 5:30-7 p.m.. 

Th 1:30-3:20 

F 11-12:30 

LSTC B-331 

Jesus and the Gospels 

A study of the four gospels and the way each au- 
thor structured and edited the tradition to respond 
to the specific needs of the church. Introduction 
to current reconstructions of the life of Jesus. 
Rhoads MW 1-2:50 Spring 

Krentz MW 1-2:50 Spring 

NBTS NT 302 
Paul and His Letters 

This course is a general introduction to the letters 
and theology of Paul. Special attention is given to 
recent Pauline scholarship and to issues of method 
in the interpretation and use of Paul today. 
Cosgrove T 9-1:30 Spring 

TEDS NT731 

Backgrounds of Early Christianity 

Introduction to primary sources and recent literary 
finds in Judaism, the Hellenistic religions and the 
social history of the early Roman Empire. Provides 
a background for the study of the ministry of Jesus 
and the life and mission of the early church. 
Lief eld TBA Spring 

II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTS CH425 

Gospel of Mark 

An exegetical study of the first gospel which 



82 



NEW TESTAMENT 



stresses the nature of oral tradition, the origin 
of Christianity and the traditions of Jesus be- 
fore the canon was formed. 
Snyder M 9-12:40 Spring 

CTU B435 

The Gospel According to Luke 

A study of the Gospel and its major theological 
themes. Particular focus on Luke's christology 
and portrayal of discipleship for women and men 
followers of "the Way." 

LaVerdiere Intensive Spring 

March 30; April 27; May 11, 25 

CTU B453 

Paul: The Corinthian Correspondence 

A study of Paul and his theology with special 
focus on 1-2 Corinthians, the primary letters in 
which to see Paul's pastoral theology and spiri- 
tuality at work. 
Osiek MW 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTC B-548 

The Book of Revelation and Popular Culture 

A study of the book of Revelation's visionary 

imagery and structure, its message of hope and 

judgment, its prophetic setting in communities 

of first-century Asia Minor and its interpretive 

life in art, film, literature and recent liberation 

movements. 

Rossing T 2:30-5 Spring 

LSTC B-650 

Graduate Biblical Seminar IV: Wisdom, 

Miracle and Prayer in the Synoptic Gospels 

Study of their interrelationships in Q and the 
Synoptics, with implications for Christology. 
Readings in wisdom literature, ancient, miracle 
texts and prayers. Evaluation of modern exegeti- 
cal literature. 
Krentz T 1-4:30 Spring 

MTS B-407 
Interpreting the Gospels 

Examination of the early traditions, forms and 
sources of which Synoptic Gospels were com- 
posed and the distinctive literary and theologi- 
cal character of each. Consideration also of John. 
Attention to Christology and historical Jesus. 
Brawley TTh 8-9:50 Spring 



NBTS NT404H 

El Evangelio de Juan (The Gospel of John) 

Este curso intenta una compresion clara del 
cuarto evangelio y de la comunidad de fe donde 
se lo forjo. Se analizara dos veces: primero en 
procura de temas centrales, y segundo siguiendo 
la narrativa del evangelio. 
Weiss Th 6:30-9:10 p.m. Spring 

NPTS BIBL-162 
Second Corinthians 

Exegetical study focusing on Paul's handling of 
internal and external challenges to his pastoral 
authority. Analyzes the nature of pastoral 
minstry, the relation of the local church to its 
society, the intermediate state, stewardship and 
Paul's model. L 
Belleville M 2-5 Spring 

S-WTS 02-603S 
The Fourth Gospel 

The study of the Gospel of John in the context 

of its historical environment. 

Pervo TTh 1-2:50 Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN NEW TESTAMENT 

CTS CH429x 

Romans: A Theological/Political Reading 

(For course description see Theological Studies in.) 
Jennings T 9-12:40 Spring 

CTU B555 

The Church in the New Testament 

A seminar to investigate various perceptions of 
church in the New Testament, exploring how 
the early communities responded to questions 
of organization, ministry, theology and praxis 
in order to ascertain their respective self-under- 
standings as "church." 
Bowe T 10-12:45 Spring 

CTU BH505 

Topics in the History 

of New Testament Exegesis 

This seminar will explore the ways in which 
key texts from the Gospels and the Pauline 
epistles have been interpreted throughout church 
history. Some background in Christian thought 



83 



NEW TESTAMENT 



is desirable, though not necessary. 
Madigan W 10-12:45 



Spring 



CTU BW466 

Liturgy of the Synagogue II 

The Liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh Hashana, 
Yom Kippur and Sukkot and their theological 
implications. In addition to examining the core 
structure, special attention will be given to the 
Piyyutim (religious poetry). 
Perelmuter TTh 1 1:30-12:45 Spring 

GETS 12-619 

New Testament Interpretation 

through Cross-Cultural Eyes 

An exercise in cross-cultural hermeneutics. As 
the students work exegetically through some key 
New Testament passages, four different ap- 
proaches to the Bible will be spelled out: Afri- 
can-American, Feminist/Womanist, Asian and 
Hispanic. 
Vena TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTC B-555/MTS B-509 
The Modern Quest for Jesus 

Who was Jesus? What was his purpose? What 
did he say and do? This course will assess re- 
cent reconstructions of the historical Jesus and 
their significance for contemporary faith. Prereq: 
basic Gospels course. Greek optional. 
Mitchell/Rhoads M 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 

MTS B-419K 

Prayers in the New Testament 

(Taught in Korean) 

Survey of New Testament prayers with analysis of 
literary forms and historical contexts. Background 
of ancient understandings of prayer; attention directed 
to prayers of Jesus, the apostles and Paul, and to 
liturgical prayers in the Apocalypse of John. 
Cha T 9-11:50 Spring 



TEDS NT764 
Pauline Theology 

Seminar in the writings of Paul and recent writ- 
ers on Paul to discover the nature and 
distinctives of Paulinism. 
Harris TBA Spring 

IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

CTU B441 

Gospel of John from the Greek Text 

A study of the Gospel of John with attention to its 
distinctive style and theology, its overall struc- 
ture and content. Prereq: elementary Greek. L 
Osiek TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

LSTC B-339 
Greek Readings 

Designed for those who have had an introduc- 
tory Greek course, this course will continue the 
study of Greek grammar, based on the reading 
of selected parts of the Greek New Testament. 
Holloway MW 3-4:15 Spring 

MTS B-325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek II 

Continues and completes introduction to Greek 
begun in B-324; see description in Winter. 
Tanzer TF 10-11:50 Spring 

MTS B-325H 

Introduction al Greigo 

del Nuevo Testamento II 

(Introduction to New Testament Greek II) 

(For course description see MTS B-325 above.) 
Cortes-Fuentes TTh 6-7:50 p.m. Spring 

NPTS BIBL-114 

New Testament Greek Readings 

(For course description see Fall NPTS BIBL-1 12.) 
Belleville TBA Spring 



NBTS NT454H 

El periodo intertestamentario 

(The Intertestamental Period) 

Estudio de corrientes politico-religiosas y temas 
teologicos de la literatura judia entre la guerra 
macabea y la caida de Jerusalen. Consideration 
especial a textos que influyen para reconstruir 
el contexto neotestamentario. 
Weiss F 9:30-12:10 Spring 



S-WTS 02-524GS 
Greek Readings 

A sequel to Intensive Elementary Greek (pre- 
requisite for this course). In the context of pre- 
pared translations from the Greek Bible, the 
course will provide a general review of gram- 
mar and the development of basic Greek vocabu- 
lary. One-half unit. 
Pervo MW 3-4:50 Spring 



K4 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

G-ETS 13-501s 
History of Christianity I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Groh TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 13-502s 
History of Christianity II 

(For course description see Winter.) 

Stein MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 13-503s 

History of Christianity III 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Keller TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

LSTC H-332 

Church History: Enlightenment to the Present 

A thematic survey from the 1 8th century to the 
present, including the church's response to the 
Enlightenment, the impact of the scientific and 
industrial revolutions, the emergence of global 
Christianity and 20th-century theological voices. 
Hendel MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

MTS H-300s 

Transformations of Christianity: 

A Foundational Course 

(For course description see Fall.) 

TBA TTh 10-11:50 Spring 

II. HISTORY OF 
PARTICULAR TRADITIONS 

CTS CH367 

History and Polity 

of the United Church of Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, includ- 
ing its antecedents: the Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches and the Evangelical and Reformed 
Church. This course meets current UCC require- 
ments for ordination. 
TBA Th 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU H401 
Patristics 

A study of the theological perspectives of major 



writers of the early church 
302orCH325 orequiv. 
Madigan TTh 11:30-12:45 



Prereq: H 300, H 
Spring 



LSTC H-360 

Lutheran Confessional Heritage 

An introduction to the classical confessions of 
the Lutheran Reformation: their origins and re- 
lation to Scripture and creeds; their theological 
and practical content; their implications for 
Lutheran identity, pastoral practice and ecumeni- 
cal relations. 

Hendel T 8:30-9:45; 10:45-12 Spring 
Pero MTh 10:45-12 Spring 

MTS H-421 

20th Century Christianity: 

Global Pentecostalism 

A comparative study of the emergence and develop- 
ment of global Pentecostalism as an indigenous Chris- 
tian movement in North America, Africa and South 
America. Includes classical Pentecostalism, charis- 
matic renewal and African indigenous churches. 
Daniels T 6-9:20 p.m. Spring 

III. HISTORY — INDIVIDUALS 

MTS H-401 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

Study of Calvin's theology through various editions 
of the Institutes. Approaches Calvin through his as- 
sociations with other reformers to discern contours 
of his theology and aspects of continuity/differences 
between him and later forms of Calvinism. 
Sawyer W 2-4:50 Spring 

IV. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY 

GETS 13-642s 

Topics in American Religious History: 

Religion and the American Way 

Examination of significant issues, movements 
and persons. Prereq: 13-501, 502, 503 orequiv. 
Murphy TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

NETS CH360 

History of the African American Religious 

Experience in America 

This course seeks to trace the development and 
history of the African American religious expe- 
rience and church in America from the African 



85 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 



Diaspora to the present. 

Butler T 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

NPTS HIST-252 

The American Churches in the 20th Century 

Analyzes theological currents of American 
churches in this century: social gospel, Christo- 
centric liberalism, fundamentalism, neo-ortho- 
doxy, neo-evangelicalism, civil religion, the New 
Right and Moral Majority, charismatic churches, 
the electronic church. 
Grahatn TBA Spring 

V. SELECT TOPICS 
IN CHURCH HISTORY 

CTU BH505x 

Topics in the History of New Testament 
Exegesis 

(For course description see New Testament III.) 
Madigan W 10-12:45 Spring 

GETS 13-626 

Love and Betrayal in Early Christianity 

Examination of impact of rupturing of bonds of 
love and kinship upon doctrine and polity. 
Prereq: 13-501 orequiv. L 
Groh F 9-12 Spring 

LSTC H-465 

Women in Church History 

This course surveys the contributions of women 
to the life of the church. Students read litera- 
ture from each of the eras of church history. The 
impact of women on the church and vice versa. 
Juris son MW 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTC T-546 

History of the Church as a Theological 

Problem 

Seminar will focus upon the theological issues that 
confront historians and theologians as they try to 
understand the church's history. Principal figures to 
be studied: F. C. Baur, Albrecht Ritschl, Adolph von 
Harnack, Jean Danielou and Jaroslav Pelikan. 
Hefner T 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

MS HI381 

Church and Totalitarian Society 

Examines the texture of intellectual, theologi- 
cal and political life in the totalitarian and au- 



thoritarian regimes in Germany, Italy, Spain and 
Mexico in the first half of this century, and as- 
sesses the Church's response and its significance 
today. 
Hennessey TF 1:15-2:35 Spring 

NPTS HSTX-224 

Early Christian Fathers 

This seminar includes readings and research on 
the development of Christian doctrine in the 
Eastern and Western fathers during the first six 
centuries of the church. 
P. Anderson M 7-10 p.m. Spring 

THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

CTU D325s 

Introduction to Theology 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Bevans MW 10-11:15 Spring 

G-ETS 21-500s 

Contexts and Methodologies for Contempo- 
rary Theology 

(For course description see Fall.) 

D.Vogel MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

G-ETS 21-502s 
Systematic Theology II 

(For course description see Winter.) 

Will MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-313 
Christian Theology III 

For description of the Christian Theology se- 
quence, see LSTC T-311, Christian Theology 
(Fall). The third course in the sequence deals 
with the Holy Spirit, the Church, the means of 
grace, the Christian life and eschatology. 
Westhelle MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

Rodriguez TTh 1-2:15 Spring 

MTS 1-478 

Seminar on Research Methods 

For Masters students. Teaches "how to" of ef- 
fective argumentation; examines and critiques 



86 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



models of methodologies from the various fields. 
Students will develop and refine research pro- 
posals. Prereq: coursework in three fields. 
Mitchell W 2-4:50 Spring 

NPTS THEO-200 
Introduction to Theology 

Students are given an introduction both to theo- 
logical methodology (the use of Scripture, tradi- 
tion, culture and experience) and to selected fig- 
ures in 19th and 20th century theology. 4 hours. 
Staff T 1:30-5 Spring 

S-WTS 05-615S 
Development of Doctrine 

An overview of the development of selected is- 
sues in Christian thought from the first through 
the nineteenth centuries. Faith and reason; 
Christ and salvation. 
Barker WF 9-10:50 Spring 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

CTU D520 

Theology of Karl Rahner 

A seminar treating the major themes of Rahner's 
theology with particular emphasis on the philo- 
sophical orientation that shapes this style of theo- 
logical reflection. 
Hayes Sa 9-12 Spring 

GETS 21-634 

Theology of Howard Thurman 

Systematic study of central theological motifs 
in Thurman' s thought; attention to his theologi- 
cal methods in the understanding of mysticism, 
God, self, Christology, eschatology, evil, com- 
munity and the spirituals. Prereq: 21-502 and 
21-503. L 
Young T 6-9 p.m. Spring 

GETS 21-642 

Judaism in the Early Christian Period 

Examination of the post-biblical literature of 
Judaism, with emphasis on the Talmud — its 
structure, history and theology; thought currents 
in the centuries paralleling early Christianity. 
.5 unit. 
Schaalmann W 5:40-7:30 p.m. Spring 



NETS TH511 

Doctrine of Reconciliation in the Theology 

of Karl Barth 

This seminar-style course will read one volume 
of the fourth part of the Church Dogmatics 
(probably Volume IV/1 containing his discus- 
sion of Christology of condescension, justifica- 
tion, sin as pride and faith). L 
Dayton W 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTS CH429 

Romans: A Theological/Political Reading 

This course will emphasize social, political and 
theological dimensions of the themes of justice 
(righteousness), legality (law) and loyalty (faith) 
crucial to Paul's argument. Dialogue with theo- 
logical exegesis (Luther, Barth) will inform our 
discussion. 
Jennings T 9-12:40 Spring 

CTS TEC 481 

Sexual and Domestic Violence 

Examination of the dynamics of sexual assault/ 
abuse, violence within families and other forms 
of violation. Attention to gender, class and ra- 
cial/ethnic issues; resources for theological re- 
flection/pastoral practice; planning for effective 
action. 

Thistlethwaite/Livezey/Matthews Spring 

M 6:30-9:30 p.m. 

CTS TEC 496 
Good and Evil 

Exploration of contemporary struggles with issue 
of violence in revolutionary situations, in Ameri- 
can peace movement, in women's movement and 
in the third world situation. Special reference to 
use of political violence in struggle for liberation. 
Thistle thwaite W 9-12:40 Spring 

CTS TEC 561 

Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 

A phenomenological examination of psychopa- 
thology will be the occasion for theological re- 
flection on the nature and dynamics of alienation, 
sin and evil as manifest in human personality. 
Moore W 2-5 Spring 



87 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



CTU CD456 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity 

This course explores the meaning behind God 
images in MesoAmerican religion and Mexican 
popular religiosity in dialogue with Western clas- 
sical and feminist theologies. 
Riebe-Estrella MW 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU D435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning origins, 
evil and finality. This course focuses principally on 
the Christian tradition with only occasional references 
to similar themes in world religions. 
Hayes TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU D561 

Created and Uncreated Grace: 

Spirit in the World 

This seminar will explore the Christian tradition's 
understanding of Created and Uncreated Grace 
(God) with emphasis on the role of the Holy Spirit 
in the world. 
Phelps W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU DC436 

Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness 

A study of the notion of myth, mythic conscious- 
ness and the way myths are used in the Bible 
and in various cultures to express the origin of 
the world and humankind, the origin of evil and 
the individual and collective end. 
Schreiter T 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU DC446 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

This course will examine critically the theologi- 
cal and biblical foundations of the missionary 
nature of the church and major challenges fac- 
ing that issue today, e.g., inculturation, evange- 
lization, social justice and prophetic witness. 
Phelps TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

GETS 21-637 

Theological Dialogue with Living Religions 

Dialogical theological reflection with major liv- 
ing religions in the Chicago area: Buddhism, 
Confucianism, Hinduism and Islam, consisting 
of lectures, dialogue with representatives of the 
religions and seminar discussion. 
Will/Bond TTh 3:30-5 Spring 



LSTC T-430 

Black Theology and the Black Church 

An analytical survey of the Black experience in 
the USA, theologically correlated with histori- 
cal, psychological and sociological factors, with 
attention to constructing an expression of Chris- 
tian reality that redemptively engages the world 
of cultures. 
Pero W 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-512 

The Doctrine of the Trinity and Modern Society 

Seminar to explore the astonishing revival of 
Trinitarian theology in the 20th century, espe- 
cially how the doctrine of the Trinity is related 
to the Christian life and to modern society. 
Among authors to be studied: Boff, Gunton, 
LaCugna, Zizioulas. 
Hutter Th 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-544 

Theology Looks at Urgent Social Issues 

Theological reflections in both personal and so- 
cietal dimensions on several pressing issues that 
are posed by science and technology: environment, 
genetic medicine and the neurosciences. 
Hefner Th 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-604 

Graduate Theological Seminar: 

Issues and Options 

For graduate students in theology. Will focus 
on the essential issues that Christian theology 
must deal with today and assess the ways in 
which various schools of thought are dealing 
with these issues. P 
Westhelle W 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-672 

Advanced Religion and Science Seminar 

This seminar includes both faculty and students 
and deals each year with a specific field within 
the field of religion and science. (For post- 
M.Div. students. Admission of others by con- 
sent of instructor.) P 
Gilbert/ Hefner M 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

MTS T-319 

Theology in the 20th Century: 

Unanswered Questions 

A retrospective survey of 20th century Chris- 



ss 



ETHICAL STUDIES 



tian theology to highlight broadening and con- 
verging trends that raise problems and open new 
vistas for theology in the 21st century. Read- 
ings, etc. will focus on major representative the- 
ologies and movements. 
Parker MW 10-11:50 Spring 

MTS T-430 

God, Suffering and Evil 

If God is good and all-powerful, why is there so 
much suffering and evil in the world? Various 
attempts to answer the question will be consid- 
ered and evaluated as theological problems the 
question raises are explored. Prereq: T-300 or 
equiv. 
Case-Winters T 1-3:50 Spring 

MTS T-439 
Theologies from Asia 

Survey of reformulations of Christian theology 
out of the Asian context which is pluralistic in 
religious tradition and transforming in social 
structure. Forms of interfaith dialogue and so- 
cial engagement that shape Asian theologies will 
be examined. 
Chun T 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 

NPTS HSTX-224x 

Early Christian Fathers 

(For course description see Historical Studies V.) 
P.Anderson M 7-10 p.m. Spring 

SCUPE M304 
Christology and Culture 

Introduces Christology from a global, cultural 
and liberational perspective and its significance 
for urban missiology. Examines issues emerg- 
ing from different historical, theological, geo- 
graphical and cultural perspectives. Fees may 
apply; see p. 19. 
Pinto April 2-5 Spring 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

I. MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E375s 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Pawlikowski MW 1-2:15 Spring 



G-ETS 21/22-503s 
Theological Ethics 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Eugene TTh 9-10:50 



Spring 



G-ETS 22-507 

Health and Life, Suffering and Death 

How does biblical faith conceive of life's pas- 
sages? How do we face ethical challenges from 
birth to death? We will study of theological, ethi- 
cal and pastoral texts as we seek to establish our 
own theoretical and practical philosophy. L 
K. Vaux TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

MS MO309 

The Splendor of Truth (Veritatis Splendor) 

Veritatis Splendor is an encyclical of John Paul II 
treating fundamental questions of the church's 
moral teaching, which this course will study, along 
with an in-depth analysis of the methodology 
employed to determine proper moral behavior. 
Boyle MTh 1:15-2:35 Spring 

MTS E-300 

Introduction to Contemporary Christian Ethics 

Introduction to content and methods of Chris- 
tian ethical thought around three questions: 
What is Christian ethics? What are ways of 
doing and primary sources of Christian ethics? 
How are methods and sources used in analyz- 
ing ethical problems? 
Hadsell/Livezey MW 2-3:50 Spring 

NPTS THEO-220 

Christian Ethics and the Church 

Several contemporary moral issues are consid- 
ered from the perspective of biblical and theo- 
logical guidelines. The role of the congregation 
and other church structures is a major focus. 4 
hours. 
Nelson MWTh 8-9:15 Spring 

TEDS PR751 
Ethical Theory 

The principal theories and problems of philo- 
sophical ethics, including the meaning of ethi- 
cal language, alternative theories of the right 
and the good, and the implications of moral is- 
sues for the concept of God and other theologi- 
cal questions. 
J. Feinberg TBA Spring 



89 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

II. SELECT TOPICS IN ETHICS 

CTU E481 

Sexual Ethics for the Christian 

A study of sexuality and sexual behavior, espe- 
cially in unmarried Christians. It will investi- 
gate the moral tradition, the elements which 
form a contemporary Christian vision of sexu- 
ality and how these relate to sexual conduct. 
Nairn T 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU E536 

Ambiguity in Moral Decision-Making 

Assessing R. McCormick's "Ambiguity in Moral 
Choice" in light of tradition and continuing de- 
bate, this course examines the notion of ethical 
bordering situations, double-effect methodology, 
"ontic evil," and the "direct-indirect" distinc- 
tion in ethics. 
Nairn T 1-3:45 Spring 

CTU E574 

The Moral Life in Literature 

This course will examine dimensions, themes 
and issues in the moral life through works of 
literature. Special attention will be given to 
development of character and its crucial virtues. 
Wadell Th 8:30-11:15 Spring 

G-ETS 22-623 

Rural Communities and the Small Church 

Analysis of kinds of rural communities in the 
midst of social change; ethical issues related to 
agriculture and appropriate patterns and strate- 
gies for the Christian community to carry out its 
mission in such settings; field visits and case 
studies. 
Tholin/Keefer Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC E-311 

M.A. Issues Seminar: 

Response to Race and Ethnicity 

An issue facing the church is conflict over re- 
sponses to race and ethnicity. This course seeks 
to provide tools for analysis, investigation of 
Christian ecumenical responses and develop- 
ment of a self-aware ethical response. 
Restructed to M.A. students. 
Perry W 2:30-5 Spring 



LSTC E-431 

Spirit and Law: 

The Christian Life in Ecumenical Perspective 

What are they saying about the Christian life? 
Is there anything that can be said and taught 
about it? These questions are addressed by en- 
gaging the Reformation tradition and the Ro- 
man Catholic tradition through the lens of the 
key catechisms of each. 
Hutter MW 3-4:15 Spring 

M/L E338 

The Democratic Faith 

The religious, ethical and political content of 
the democratic faith as a distinct structure of 
belief and action in world history. 
Engel F 1:30-4 Spring 

M/L M366x 

Arts of Ministry: Public Ministry 

(For course description see Ministry Studies I.) 
Shadle/Engel W 9:30-12 Spring 

MS M0335 

Recent American Conflicts 

and the Just War Theory 

This course will study the principles of a just war 

and three recent American armed conflicts — 

Korean Police Action, Vietnam Conflict and the 

Desert Shield Operation — in order to ascertain 

whether these conflicts are in keeping with these 

principles. 

Boyle MTh 2:40-4 Spring 

NBTS TE410 
Seminar in Ethics 

This seminar-style course will take an issue of con- 
troversy in the church (abortion, homosexuality, etc.) 
and explore the reasons (biblical, historical, theo- 
logical, etc.) Christians take different positions on 
the issue. Topic for 1996: Homosexuality. L 
Dayton M 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

S-WTS 08-610S 
Anglican Identity 

Beginning with the question of what is distinctive 
about Anglican identity, the course will explore this 
question by a close reading and assessment of se- 
lected Anglican thinkers such as Hooker, Taylor, 
Butler, Wesley, Maurice, Kirk and Temple. 
Sedgwick TTh 3-4:50 Spring 



90 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 



TEDS ST777 

Classical Readings in Bioethical Issues 

Readings in bioethics from Hippocrates down 
to the beginning of the modern bioethics period 
in Fletcher and Ramsay, with a special focus in 
the birth and development of the Hippocratic/ 
Judeo-Christian tradition. 
Brown TBA Spring 



RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 



CTS CH450x 

Moses, Jesus and Madison 

(For course description see Old Testament III.) 
LaCocque/Grossman W 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTS TEC 452 
Engaging the Powers 

This course will examine individual and social 
transformation using the work of Walter Wink 
as its central focus. Issues of race, class and 
gender will be examined and strategies for 
change will be explored. 
Cairns W 2-5 Spring 

CTS TEC481x 

Sexual and Domestic Violence 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Thistlethwaite/Livezey/ Matthews Spring 

M 6:30-9:30 p.m. 

CTS TEC496x 
Good and Evil 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Thistlethwaite W 9-12:40 Spring 

LSTC T-512x 

The Doctrine of the Trinity 

and Modern Society 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Hutter Th 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

MS HI381x 

Church and Totalitarian Society 

(For course description, see Historical Studies V.) 
Hennessey TF 1:15-2:35 Spring 



MS M0335x 

Recent American Conflicts 

and the Just War Theory 

(For course description see Ethical Studies II.) 
Boyle MTh 2:40-4 Spring 

NBTS CT310 

Church and Society: 

A Cross-Cultural Approach 

This course considers theological presuppositions 
about the relation of church and society and ana- 
lyzes the U.S. socio-economic-political-cultural 
situation as a reality in conflict. Students develop 
paradigms for the Church's life and mission. L 
Mottesi T 2:30-5:10 Spring 

SCUPE M302 
June Term in Chicago 

Designed to integrate an academic understanding of 
urban systems with the practical experience of liv- 
ing within an ethnic community affected by such sys- 
tems. Students will live and work in an ethnic neigh- 
borhood. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
McGibbon June 1-9 Spring 



WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 

CTU C300 

The Experience of Religion 

Students will be encouraged to appreciate the 
unfamiliar and the cross-cultural elements in 
religions. Authentic ministry demands empa- 
thy and understanding of other people's reality. 
Not easily achievable, such understanding is 
possible to undertake. 
Schroeder MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTU C 505/LSTC W-425 
Globalization and the Mission 
of the Church Catholic 

This CCGM-sponsored seminar will study the 
world-wide phenomenon of globalization as the 
context for Christian mission. What are the roles 
of Christian mission, catholicity, global spiritu- 
ality, global ethics and reconciliation within this 
context? 
Bevans/Bliese/Schreiter W 7-9:50 p. m Spring 



91 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 



CTU C508 

Mission Trends: Recent Theology 

A historical overview of theologies of mission is fol- 
lowed by concentration on current theological issues 
in ecumenical mission. Concludes with a look at 
developing trends and emerging paradigms. 
Gittins W 1-3:45 Spring 



Pentecost to the present. 
Tucker TBA 



Spring 



HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 



CTU C564 

Literacy, Orality, Evangelization 

We consider the power of the spoken word 
("orality").in socialization, value-formation and 
pedagogy, and reassess methods of evangeliza- 
tion in relation to the wisdom of oral cultures. 
Prereq: C 41 1 or equiv.; consult instructor. 
Gittins Th 10-12:45 Spring 

CTU CW351x 

Introduction to Liturgy 

in a Cross-Cultural Context 

(For course description see Ministry Studies IV.) 
Perez W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU CW511 

Religious Experience of Initiation 

Through a study of Christ) in initiation and 
Melanesian traditional initio ion, both as reli- 
gious-cultural phenomena, t) is seminar focuses 
on the theological, cultural a id pastoral issues in 
the holistic process of contextual izing initiation. 
Schroeder T 10-12:45 Spring 

CTU DC446x 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

(For course description see Theological Studies III.) 
Phelps TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

LSTC W-513 

Full Communion: Approaches to Church 

Unity 

A critical examination of the offical ELCA ecu- 
menical goal of "Full Communion" against the 
background of Faith and Order discussions and 
agreements and inter-confessional dialogues and 
agreements between Lutherans and other major 
confessional bodies. 
Scherer Th 2:30-5 Spring 

TEDS ME751 

History of Missions in the Modern World 

A study of the expansion of Christianity from 



LSTC W-532 

Encounters and Clashes: 

Islam and Christianity in History 

To understand better the dynamics of Christian- 
Muslim relations, one needs to look at what has 
transpired in the past. This course will exam- 
ine texts that make and mark that path. Discus- 
sion of them and with Muslims will shape our 
style of learning. 
Vogelaar W 3-5:30 Spring 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

CTU M409s 

Ministry on the Margins 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Staff TBA Spring 

G-ETS 34-503 

Equipping the Church 

for Mission and Evangelism 

Responsibilities of pastor, Christian educator 
and laity in leading and empowering the con- 
gregation for mission and evangelism. Theol- 
ogy of church and ministry; congregational 
analysis; styles of leadership and evangelism; 
administrative practices. L P 
Wingeier/Tuttle TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

LSTC M-421 

Jewish Perspectives on Ministry 

An overview of Jewish thought and practice as 
an orientation to ministry in a pluralistic com- 
munity. Special focus on Jewish resources for 
Christian ministry; liturgical traditions, schol- 
arly and homiletical resources. Visits to Jewish 
institutions. 
Berman Th 2:30-5 Spring 



92 



LSTC M-422 

Challenges in Rural Ministry 

An examination of common misperceptions of 
small town and farming communities and an 
identification of the distinctive values and cul- 
tural traditions of rural communities. Efforts 
will be made to contextualize pastoral ministry 
in rural congregations. 
Niedenthal T 2:30-5 Spring 

LSTC M-451H 

Seminario de pastoral hispana 
(Hispanic Ministries Seminar) 

Este curso busca integrar la teoria y la practica 

de la pastoral en el contexto hispano. Combinara 

el entendimiento actual del participate en esta 

tarea, los recursos disponibles y la formulation 

personal de la pastoral integrando los otros dos 

elementos. 

Rodriguez M 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-490 
Evangelism 

After a survey of the history of evangelism, this 

course will study programs of evangelism used 

in a variety of ecumenical contexts. Students 

will construct their own theology and praxis of 

evangelism. 

Bliese F 9-11:50 Spring 

M/L M308 

Church Administration 

Considers theories and practice of church orga- 
nizational development, program administration, 
working with volunteers, membership, growth 
and financial management from systems and 
religious perspectives. L 
Mannheim TBA Spring 

M/L M366 

Arts of Ministry: Public Ministry 

Addresses the role of the liberal church and min- 
istry in the world: What is public ministry? How 
are public issues raised, defined, resolved? What 
do churches and ministers contribute to justice 
making and the enhancement of public life? P 
Shadle/Engel W 9:30-12 Spring 

MS PI441 

Critical Issues in Hispanic Ministry 

Diverse Catholic Hispanic communities in the 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

U.S., the impact of the pluralistic U.S. on His- 
panics, socio-economic issues, popular religion, 
the appeal of evangelical and Pentecostal reli- 
gious groups and second and third generation 
Hispanic Catholics. 
Folliard/Mendez W 8:25-11:15 Spring 

MTS M-378 

Local Church Administration 

Decisions concerning translating faith convic- 
tions and experiences in application in ministry 
are essential. Focus will be on planning, doing 
and evaluating parts and wholeness of one's 
ministry. 
Hindman M 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 

NPTS MNST-266 
Introduction to Church Planting 

This course seeks to teach the principles of plant- 
ing culturally-relevant and reproducing churches 
to reach unchurched people. Special emphasis 
is given to understanding the variables of per- 
sonalities, locations and communities. 
Collins M 2-5 Spring 

NPTS MNST-374 

Stewardship and Financial Management 

A study of the theology and practice of steward- 
ship and financial management, both in the 
church and for the pastor. 
Carlson MWTh 10:15-11:30 Spring 

TEDS CE754 

Change, Power and Conflict Management 

A study of the process of change, power and 

conflict management particularly as pertaining 

to a Christian context of ministry. Lectures and 

discussions enhanced with case studies and 

guest instructors in pastoral and management 

roles. 

Benson TBA Spring 



II. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTS CM435x 

Jungian Psychology and Contemporary 

Spirituality 

(For course description see Ministry Studies III.) 
Moore Th 9-12:40 Spring 



93 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

CTU S410 
Spiritual Direction 

History of the notion of spiritual direction; quali- 
ties of the director; aims of the experience and 
different types and forms of the spiritual dialogue. 
Students will engage in role-playing various col- 
loquies and share in evaluating the experiences. 
TBA MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU SB629 

Jewish Mysticism, Messianism and Spirituality 

The mystical substratum of Jewish experience 
examined by a study of its development from 
the third pre-Christian century to the modern 
era, including Qumran, Messianic movements 
and Hasidism. The landmark work of Gershom 
Scholem is carefully examined. L 
Perelmuter W 8:30-11:15 Spring 

M/L 1300s 

Spiritual Journey Workshop 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Gerdes T 4-5:30 Spring 

NCTI Seminar II 

(= G-ETS 40-CTI, MS H454, NPTS MNST- 
206, S-WTS CT194, TEDS PT 875) 
Prayer and Life in the Spirit 

Designed to provide an opportunity to explore, 
through study and applied experience, the roots 
and the historical development of theological 
presuppositions underlying spiritual traditions 
in Christianity. Meets at various locations. L 
Weborgetal. W 7-10 p.m. + 2 weekends Spring 

NPTS MNST-103 

Spiritual Formation II!: Spiritual Disciplines 

The course offers instruction and practice in a 
variety of ways in which the disciplines help to 
foster and sustain faith, hope and love in the 
life of the believer. 1 hour. 
Weborg T 8-9:50 Spring 



III. PASTORAL CARE 

CTS CM 331 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 
and Moral Guidance 

An overview of basic texts in pastoral care. In- 
volves theoretical and practical understanding 
of approaches to caring and counseling integra- 
tion of the student as pastor and person. Re- 
quired attendance at all sessions. L 
Miller-McLemore M 2-5 Spring 

CTS CM 435 

Jungian Psychology 

and Contemporary Spirituality 

Investigates Jungian contributions to the theory/ 
practice of spirituality. Includes theoretical/expe- 
riential approaches to role of the shadow, influ- 
ence of psychological typology, experience of 
synchronicity and spiritual significance of dreams. 
Moore Th 9-12:40 Spring 

CTS TEC452x 

Engaging the Powers 

(For course description see Religion and Society 

Studies.) 

Cairns W 2-5 Spring 

CTS TEC561x 

Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 

(For course description see Theological Studies in.) 
Moore W 2-5 Spring 

CTU MP427 

Counseling Ministry in the Parish Context 

Considers principles and skills of time-limited 
pastoral counseling in the parish setting with 
people experiencing ordinary spiritual and re- 
lational problems. Also studies the task of over- 
sight of ministries in a parish context. Prereq: 
MP360 or equiv. 
Anderson T 8:30-11:15 Spring 



TEDS PT576 

Personal Development for Ministry 

A study encouraging self-assessment, measur- 
ing of gifts for careers in ministry and the per- 
sonal disciplines of piety and of interpersonal 
relationships in the light of biblical materials 
focused on leading an exemplary Christian life. 
Bui I more TBA Spring 



CTU MP531 

Modern Maladies of the Soul 

This seminar examines modern maladies of the 
soul and proposes alternatives from the Chris- 
tian tradition: from anxiety to courage, from 
loneliness to friendship, from cynicism to faith- 
fulness and from despair to hope. L 
Anderson Th 10-12:45 Spring 



94 



GETS 32-611 
Pastoral Theology 

Exploration of integration of theology with prac- 
tice of pastoral care and counseling through use 
of clinical and parish case studies presented by 
participants. Level II and III students. L 
Hogue TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 32-612 

Cultural Dynamics and Pastoral Ministry 

Provides context for an in-depth look at cultural di- 
mensions of human experience, either for debriefing 
and reflection on cross-cultural experience or as 
preparation. Focus on applications for functioning 
in pastoral role in cross-cultural contexts. L 
Hinkle F 9-12 Spring 

GETS 32-633 

Pastoral Therapy with Groups 

Application of principles of group therapy to 
practice of ministry in monocultural and 
multicultural contexts. L 
Hinkle Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-320 
Pastoral Care 

Offers opportunities to reflect theologically, cul- 
turally and psychologically about pastoral care 
situations; to practice pastoral care skills; and 
to explore pastoral identity. Participants must 
be able to make pastoral visits. 
Billman TTh 1-2:15 Spring 

Billman M 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

MTS M-311 
Pastoral Counseling 

Introduction of basic concepts and models for ef- 
fective pastoral counseling, including initial as- 
sessment, establishing counseling relationship, 
maintaining caring and helpful relationships, re- 
ferrals and techniques for various situations. 
TBA M 1-3:50 Spring 

MTS M-333 

Pastoral Care in the Black Church 

Course will examine practical and theological 
resources required for effective pastoral care and 
relate pastoral care in the Black Church to edu- 
cation, preaching/worship, social ministry and 
cultural affirmation. 
Ashby T 9-11:50 Spring 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

NBTS CTPC405 
Human Sexuality 
in the Context of Pastoral Care 

An examination of the place of human sexual- 
ity in self-fulfillment and self-understanding, 
especially as it relates to the pastoral care min- 
istry of the church. LP 
Justes TTh 9:30-10:50 Spring 

NBTS INPC301 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

An introductory course including the develop- 
ment of skills in integrating theology and the 
practice of ministry with an understanding of 
issues in inter-personal relationships. L 
Justes W 1-3:40 Spring 



IV. LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

CTS CM 314 

The Worshiping Congregation 

Meaning/practice of congregational worship 
with special attention to pastoral dimension of 
worship and role of the worship leader. The 
liturgical year will provide basic structure, but 
study will include marriage, funeral and occa- 
sional services. 
Edge r ton W 9-12:40 Spring 

CTU BW466x 

Liturgy of the Synagogue II 

(For course description see New Testament III.) 
Perelmuter TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTU CW351 

Introduction to Liturgy 

in a Cross-Cultural Context 

Basic issues and elements of Christian liturgy 
in a cross-cultural context, using Latino religious 
practices as models, and with special attention 
given to the liturgical documents of the Roman 
Catholic Church. Required lab sessions. 
Perez W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU CW511x 

Religious Experience of Initiation 

(For course description see World Mission Studies.) 
Schroeder T 10-12:45 Spring 



95 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



CTU MW474 

Lay Leadership of Prayer 

A practicum in the leadership of the community's 
prayer, including Hours, catechumenate rites, 
wake and graveside services, penance services, 
services of Word and Communion and ministry 
to the sick. 
Hughes T 3-5:45 Spring 

CTU W 455s 

Becoming a Catholic Christian: 

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Hughes W 7-9:45 p.m. Spring 



GETS 31-51 Is 
Christian Public Worship 

(For course description see Fall.) 
Duck MW 5:40-7:30 p.m. 



Spring 



GETS 31-634 

Healing and Reconciliation 

in Christian Worship 

Explores healing and reconciliation through 
theological reflection and the study and design 
of worship services. Emphasis is on divine love 
and power at work restoring physical, emotional, 
spiritual well-being and right relationships 
through worship. L 
Duck TTh J: 30-3: 20 Spring 



MTS M-314 

Understanding the Dynamics 
of Corporate Worship 

Study of the nature of corporate Christian wor- 
ship from historical, theological and pastoral 
perspectives. Exploration of what gives integ- 
rity to components of worship, various services, 
observance of Christian year, etc. 
Wardlaw MW 8-9:50 Spring 

NBTS MN380H 

Hacia un culto hispano autentico 
(Towards an Authentic Hispanic Worship) 

Consideracion de los fundamentos biblico- 
teologicos del culto. Analisis de la realidad 
eclesial hispana/latinoamericana. Desarrollo de 
presupuestos en procura de un culto cristiano, 
hispano/latinoamericano y contemporaneo. 
Mottesi T 6:30-9:10 p.m. Spring 

S-WTS 09-504S 

The History and Principles 

of Liturgical Worship 

The meaning of liturgical worship and its place 
in Christian life, its expression in the classical 
liturgies of the early Church, Middle Ages and 
Reformation and its renewal in the contempo- 
rary Liturgical Movement with special empha- 
sis on the Eucharist. 
TBA MW 1-2:50 Spring 



LSTC M-487 

Christian Ritual Music of Many Cultures 

Study and performance of Christian music from 
Latino cultures, Africa, southeast Asia and Af- 
rican-American churches. Focus on understand- 
ing the musical systems, their performance prac- 
tices, their meaning and their relationships to 
liturgical traditions. 
Bangert MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

LSTC M-488 

J. S. Bach as Biblical Interpreter 

A study of selected cantatas of J. S. Bach in their 
liturgical settings. With an introduction to Bach's 
life, his works, his vocation as Lutheran cantor, 
the course focuses on how the composer unfolds 
his interpretation of texts through musical ma- 
terials. 
Bangert MW 1-2:15 Spring 



V. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

CTS CM 302 
Preaching 

The theology and practice of the preaching min- 
istry. The approach will emphasize both the art 
of sermon preparation and the place of preach- 
ing in pastoral ministry. Limited to second and 
third year students. L 

Edgerton Sec. A: T 9-12:40 Spring 

Sec. B: Th 9-12:40 

CTU MW452 

Preaching Retreats 

and Parish Missions/Renewals 

Pastoral and theological skills for leaders of re- 
treats and parish missions/renewals. Design- 
ing and programming such gatherings, as well 



96 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



as writing and preaching retreat and renewal 
conferences. Prereq: MW450 or equiv. 
Cornwell Intensive Spring 

April 13, 20; May 11, 18 

CTU W633 
Religious Imagination 
in Liturgy and Preaching 

This course explores various modes of imagining and 
their pertinence to liturgy and preaching. Participants 
will engage in a creative reading of philosophical, 
theological and artistic texts to gain insight into the 
richness of the religious imagination. 
Fragomeni T 10-12:45 Spring 

GETS 31-501s 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

(For course description see Fall). 

Chatfield (A) TTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

Chatfield (B) WF 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 35-630 

Religion and Politics in Media 

Media shapes public understanding of the relation- 
ship between religion and politics; therefore, we will 
examine public dialogue and religious sensibilities 
involved in that relationship with special reference 
to presidential politics from 1976 to 1996. 
Wall April 12-13; 19-20; 26-27; May 3-4 Spring 
F 4:30-9:30 p.m.; Sa 9-12 

G-ETS 35/22-637 

Religion and the News Media 

Seminary and journalism faculty and students 
examine what is newsworthy in religion and 
what has religious implications in the news. 
Seminar examines religious and ethical dimen- 
sions of public issues through lecture, critical 
readings and case discussion. 
Mahan T 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-453 
Christianity and Comedy 

What constitutes a comic vision of life, and what 
does that vision contribute to our Christian in- 
telligence and sensibility? Responses to these 
questions are the focus of this seminar. Read- 
ings chiefly in fictional works of comedy plus 
critical essays. 
Niedenthal W 3-5:30 Spring 



LSTC M-458 

Preaching Mark's Gospel 

Course begins with study of Mark's Gospel. 
Emphasis is on the story line. Some of the ser- 
mons to be preached in class would consist of 
telling two to four Mark stories as a way of hear- 
ing texts in biblical context. Meets at ELCA, 
8765 W. Higgins Road. 
Jensen Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

MTS M-447 

Preaching as Celebration II 

Course is a culturally sensitive treatment of the 
homiletic genius of the Black preaching tradi- 
tion. In preaching practicum students will ex- 
plore how celebration enhances sermonic design 
and delivery. Prereq: introductory level preach- 
ing course. L 
Thomas Th 6-8:50 p.m. Spring 

NBTS MN383 
Practice of Preaching 

This course intends to provide a supervised "lab" 
experience in both the practice and evaluation 
of preaching. 1 hour. L 

(-01) Duffet/Johnson T 2:30-5:10 Spring 

(-02) Duffet/Johnson T 6:30-9:15 p.m. Spring 

NPTS BIBL-237x 
Preaching Jeremiah 

(For course description see Old Testament III.) 
Koptak/Noren MWTh TBA Spring 

NPTS MNST-110 
Effective Communication 

The pastor must be an effective communicator. 
Basic verbal and non-verbal factors in the de- 
livery of a speech will be reviewed and prac- 
ticed. 2 hours. L 
Koptak MWTh 11:40-12:55 Spring 

TEDS H761 

Seminar: History of Preaching 

Biographical and sermonic survey of homileti- 
cal and rhetorical theory and of Christian preach- 
ing from apostolic times through lectures and 
research with application to the improvement 
of preaching in our own time. 
Larsen TBA Spring 



97 



MINISTRY STUDIES 



VI. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

CTS CM 429 

The Educational Ministry of the Small 
Congregation 

Small churches offer unique possibilities for 
educational ministry. Course identifies organic 
educational "centering ministry metaphors," 
freeing the congregation from the "schooling" 
concept of Christian education inhibiting many 
small church contexts. 
Myers T 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 33-502 

Teaching for Biblical Faith 

An exploration of the nature of the Bible and its 
role in Christian education and the construction 
of faith. Particular attention to approaches to 
teachiing the Bible as the church's book of faith 
and life. L 
Seymour YL. Vogel TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

GETS 33-610 

Children and Christian Faith 

How children develop physically, mentally, 
emotionally, morally and in faith, becoming 
meaningful members of the faith community. 
Child advocacy issues in light of society's atti- 
tudes and policies toward children. Issues, re- 
sources and methods. L 
Olson Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

GETS 33/22-642 

Second Generation Korean American Ministry 

How can the Korean American church minister 
to its young people? This course will examine 
second generation ministry from historical, so- 
ciological and theological perspectives and 
evaluate concretely emerging models of second 
generation ministry. 
Cha Th 6-9 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-460 
Ministry with Youth 

This course deals with the theological and de- 
velopmental principles guiding a ministry with 
youth, examining the resources available from 
a variety of groups and exploring the settings 



and strategies that can be employed in ministry 

and youth. 

Conrad Th 7-9:50 p.m. Spring 

LSTC M-461 

Rites of Initiation 

for Children, Youth and Adults 

A study of the biblical, historical and doctrinal 
aspects of this ministry and its development in 
the church today. Emphasis will be placed on 
an in-depth study of curriculum, teaching 
methodss and programs for baptism, first com- 
munion and confirmation. 
Conrad TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

M/L M415 

Religious Education Curriculum 

Explores theoretical foundations of curriculum 
design and instruction in religious education 
settings. Attention to probing critical issues, 
social and cultural contexts, the variety of re- 
sources for congregational settings and prin- 
ciples of evaluation. 
Harlow M 2-4:30 Spring 

MTS M/B-426 
Teaching the Bible 

Issues include: use of seminary language/bibli- 
cal study for teaching in the church; critical 
evaluation of curricula which focus on biblical 
content; appropriate methods for use in teach- 
ing youth and adults modeled in classroom ses- 
sion. Prereq: B-300. 
Caldwell/Tanzer T 1-3:50 Spring 

NPTS MNST-135 

Adult Ministries in the Church 

This course will assess and explore a variety of min- 
istries, to, for and with adults in the church and com- 
munity. Included will be the adult Sunday school 
class, small groups, recreational groups, retreats, 
outreach and service opportunitites. 
Staff TBA Spring 

NPTS MNST-230 
Developing Lay Leadership 

The course is an examination of the nature of leader- 
ship as a professional in the church and in equipping 
of laity for leadership responsibilities. 4 hours. 
Johnson MW 2-4 Spring 



^ 



NPTS V MNST-247 
Research/Family 

The student will research a focused concern re- 
lated to families with adolescents and write a 
paper summarizing procedure, findings and im- 
plications for ministry. Both library and field 
research are required. 
Staff TBA Spring 

VII. POLITY AND CANON LAW 

CTS CH367x 

History and Polity 

of the United Church of Christ 

(For course description see Historical Studies II.) 
TBA Th 6:30-9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU MW421s 
Church and Structure 

(For course description see Fall.) 

Neville MW 10-11:15 Spring 

GETS 34-625 

General Conference Seminar 

Advance reading and discussion of materials 
sent to United Methodist Church General Con- 
ference delegates; attendance at all general and 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

committee sessions of General Conference, with 
daily group evaluation sessions and final evalu- 
ation paper. 
Tholin/Rudy TBA Spring 

GETS 40-673 

United Methodist Studies: 20th Century 

Developments within 20th century United 
Methodism, as related to the ecumenical move- 
ment, denominational unification, world mis- 
sion, personal evangelism and social justice. 
Evolution of polity, nature of ministry and de- 
nominational structure. L 
Troxell TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 40-674 

United Methodist Studies: 

Wesley/19th Century 

The foundational contribution of John Wesley 
to the history, doctrine and polity of emerging 
Methodism. The United Methodist tradition in 
the USA through the 19th century with atten- 
tion to roles of women, Blacks, Asians and Na- 
tive Americans. 5 hours. 
SteinJTuttle W 9: -10: 50; F 9-11:50 Spring 



99 



SPECIAL AREAS OF INTEREST 
WITHIN COURSES OF STUDY 

This section lists courses in eight special areas of interest in the theological cur- 
riculum with page references for locating full course descriptions. 

AFRICAN -AMERICAN STUDIES 



FALL 

G-ETS 13-642f 
G-ETS 22-506 
G-ETS 22-641 
NBTS TH435 
SCUPE M301 
SCUPE S-H301 

WINTER 

CTS TEC 423 
CTS TEC 433 
CTU DCS575 
LSTC T-434 
M/L 1343 
MTS H-330 
MTS M-412 
NBTS TH432 
TEDS ST738 

SPRING 

G-ETS 12-619 
G-ETS 21-634 
LSTC E-311 
LSTC T-430 
MTS M-333 
MTS M-447 
NBTS CH360 



Topics in American Religious History: Black Church Leadership, p. 44 

Christian Ethics and Human Sexuality, p. 48 

African-American Critical Thought, p. 49 

The Black Christian Tradition, p. 46 

The Black Church in an Urban Culture, p. 52 

Conceptions of a City, p. 49 

Black Theological Ethics II — Human Sexuality, p. 69 

Introduction to the Black Church and the Study of African American Religion, 

Black Spirituality, p. 74 

Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr., p. 66 

Spirituality in African American Literature, p. 75 

History of the Black Church in North America, p. 64 

African-American Religious Education, p. 79 

Theological Concepts in the Literature of African American Experience, p. 67 

Political Theologies, p. 69 

New Testament Interpretation through Cross-Cultural Eyes, p. 84 

Theology of Howard Thurman, p. 87 

M.A. Issues Seminar: Response to Race and Ethnicity, p. 90 

Black Theology and the Black Church, p. 88 

Pastoral Care in the Black Church, p. 95 

Preaching as Celebration II, p. 97 

History of the African American Religious Experience in America, p. 85 



p. 71 



ASIAN STUDIES 



FALL 

MTS B-401K 
MTS B-402K 
MTS B-487K 
MTS H-416K 
MTS M-335K 
SCUPE S-H301 

WINTER 

G-ETS 34-676 
MTS M-315K 
MTS M-348K 
MTS M-349K 
MTS T-441K 

SPRING 

G-ETS 12-619 
G-ETS 33/22-642 
MTS B-419K 
MTS T-439 



Gospel of John (Taught in Korean), p. 40 

Gospel of Matthew (Taught in Korean), p. 41 

New Testament Theology (Taught in Korean), p. 41 

The History of the Korean Church, 1 884-1988 (Taught in Korean), p. 43 

Principles of Christian Education (Taught in Korean), p. 58 

Conceptions of a City, p. 49 

Chicago — An Asian Immersion Experience, p. 73 

Ministry to Young Adults (Taught in Korean), p. 73 

Pastoral Counseling in the Korean Church (Taught in Korean), p. 76 

Transformation through Care: Evangelism and Membership Care (Taught in Korean), p. 76 

Immigrant Theology and Ministry (Taught in Korean), p. 67 

New Testament Interpretation through Cross-Cultural Eyes, p. 84 
Second Generation Korean American Ministry, p. 98 
Prayers in the New Testament (Taught in Korean), p. 84 
Theologies from Asia, p. 89 



100 



CROSS-CULTURAL STUDIES 



FALL 

CTU BC433 
CTU C410 
CTU C 575f 
CTU CD460 
CTU CH325 
CTU CMP541 
CTU DC442 
CTU EC402 
CTU EC588 
CTU/MTS C 460f 
G-ETS 21-500f 
G-ETS 22-506 
G-ETS 32-620 
G-ETS 40-675 
LSTC M-416 
LSTC T-301 
LSTC W-529 
M/L M420 
MTS E-432 
SCUPE S-H301 
TEDS ME675 

WINTER 

CTU C 575w 
CTU DC441 
CTU DC448 
CTU DC605 
CTU DCS575 
CTU/MTS C 460w 
G-ETS 13-672 
G-ETS 34-676 
MS PI392 
MS SY468 
MTS M-315K 
NPTS MNST-151 
SCUPE M300 

SPRING 

CTS TEC 496 
CTU C 300 
CTU C 508 
CTU C 564 
CTU CD456 
CTU CW351 
CTU CW511 
CTU DC436 
CTU DC446 
G-ETS 12-619 
G-ETS 21 -500s 
G-ETS 32-612 
G-ETS 32-633 
LSTC E-311 
LSTC M-487 
NBTS CT310 
SCUPE M 304 



The Gospel of Mark in Cross-Cultural Perspective, p. 40 

Mission: The Contemporary Challenge, p. 50 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar, p. 50 

U.S. Latino Theologies, p. 45 

Models of Missionary Activity, p. 44 

Marriage and Family in Cross-Cultural Context, p. 54 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry, p. 46 

Natural Law and Christian Ethics, p. 48 

Seminar on Christ, Community and Christian Ethics, p. 49 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 50 

Contexts and Methodologies for Contemporary Theology, p. 45 

Christian Ethics and Human Sexuality, p. 48 

Cross-Cultural Pastoral Counseling, p. 54 

Cross-Cultural Theological Education, p. 5 1 

Local Immersion, p. 51 

Unity and Diversity, p. 45 

The Life and Times of Mohammad, p. 5 1 

Liberation Theology and Critical Pedagogy, p. 57 

Multiculturalism and Christian Ethics, p. 49 

Conceptions of a City, p. 49 

Women in Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 51 

Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar, p. 72 

Christology and Cultures, p. 68 

Marian Theology, Symbols and Inculturation, p. 68 

Constructing Local Theologies, p. 68 

Black Spirituality, p. 74 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 72 

Religion in a Culturally Diverse United States, p. 65 

Chicago — An Asian Immersion Experience, p. 73 

Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 72 

Scriptures of the World's Religious, p. 69 

Ministry to Young Adults (Taught in Korean), p. 73 

Cultural Dimensions in Missions, p. 72 

January Term in Chicago, p. 7 1 

Good and Evil, p. 87 

The Experience of Religion, p. 91 

Mission Trends: Recent Theology, p. 92 

Literacy, Orality, Evangelization, p. 92 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity, p. 88 

Introduction to Liturgy in a Cross-Cultural Context, p. 95 

Religious Experience of Initiation, p. 92 

Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness, p. 88 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church, p. 88 

New Testament Interpretation through Cross-Cultural Eyes, p. 84 

Contexts and Methodologies for Contemporary Theology, p. 86 

Cultural Dynamics and Pastoral Ministry, p. 95 

Pastoral Therapy with Groups, p. 95 

MA. Issues Seminar: Response to Race and Ethnicity, p. 90 

Christian Ritual Music of Many Cultures, p. 96 

Church and Society: A Cross-Cultural Approach, p. 91 

Christology and Culture, p. 89 



101 



HISPANIC STUDIES 



FALL 

CTU C 458 
CTU CD460 
LSTC H-459H 
MTS M-409H 
NBTS ED302H 
NBTS MN330H 
NBTS MN382H 

WINTER 

CTU CD445 
CTU CD465H 
LSTC H-485H 
MS MS330 
MTS B-324H 
NBTS BL 470H 
NBTS MN383H 
NBTS OT304H 

SPRING 

CTU CD456 
CTU CW351 
G-ETS 12-619 
LSTC M-451H 
MS PI441 
MTS B-325H 
NBTS BL440H 
NBTS MN380H 
NBTS NT404H 
NBTS NT 454H 



Hispanic Faith and Culture, p. 50 

U.S. Latino Theologies, p. 45 

Temas Principales de la Teologia Latinoamericana . p. 43 

Educacion cristiana en la iglesia hispana, p. 58 

El ministerio educativo de las iglesias hispanas. p. 58 

Liderazgo pastoral en contexto hispano, p. 52 

La predicacion pastoral: una perspective hispana, p. 57 

Toward a Hispanic Theology of Church, p. 72 

Teologia del ministerio en la comunidad hispana p. 66 

Historia de la iglesia hispana en los E.E.U.U. y el Caribe, p. 64 

Inculturation. Evangelization and Hispanic Popular Religiosity, p. 72 

Introduccion al Griego del Nuevo Testamento I, p. 63 

Exegesis Biblica: Santiago, p. 62 

La practica de la predicacion pastoral, p. 78 

Los Profetas Mayores, p. 60 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity, p. 88 

Introduction to Liturgy in a Cross-Cultural Context, p. 

New Testament Interpretation through Cross-Cultural Eyes, p. 84 

Seminario de pastoral hispana , p. 93 

Critical Issues in Hispanic Ministry, p. 93 

Introduccion al Greigo del Nuevo Testamento II, p. 84 

Exegesis Biblica: Genesis, p. 81 

Hacia un culto hispano autentico, p. 

El Evangelio de Juan , p. 83 

El perfodo intertestamentario, p. 84 



JUDAIC STUDIES 



FALL 

CTU B 525 
CTU BW465 
G-ETS 21-644 

WINTER 

CTS CH402 
CTU B417 
CTU E432 
MTS B-320 

SPRING 

CTS CH450 
CTU BW466 
CTU SB629 
G-ETS 21-642 
LSTC M-421 



Rabbinic Judaism and Jesus* Jewish Background, p. 41 
Liturgy of the Synagogue I, p. 41 
The Liturgy of the Synagogue, p. 46 

Leviticus, p. 59 

Intertestamental Literature, p. 60 

Ethical Implications of the Holocaust/Genocide, p. 69 

Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls, p. 60 

Moses, Jesus and Madison, p. 81 

Liturgy of the Synagogue II, p. 84 

Jewish Mysticism, Messianism and Spirituality', p. 94 

Judaism in the Early Christian Period, p. 87 

Jewish Perspectives on Ministry, p. 92 



URBAN AND PUBLIC POLICY STUDIES 



FALL 

CTU M 409f 
LSTC M-370f 
LSTC M-416 
LSTC T-441 



Ministry on the Margins, p. 5 1 
Introduction to Public Ministry, p. 49 
Local Immersion, p. 5 1 
Religion and American Politics, p. 47 



102 



M/L E438 Eco-Justice Citizenship, p. 49 

MTS E-416 Justice In and For Families, p. 49 

S-WTS 1 0-60 1 S Religion, American Society and Culture, p. 49 

SCUPE M 30 1 The Black Church in an Urban Culture, p. 52 

SCUPE S-H 301 Conceptions of a City, p. 49 

SCUPE S-H 3 02 Urban Systems, p. 49 

WINTER 

CTU EC425 World Poverty, Development and Life's Liberation, p. 7 1 

CTU EC545 Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience, p. 70 

G-ETS 22-504 Church and Community, p. 7 1 

MTS E/M-301 Introduction to Public Ministry, p. 70 

SCUPE B-TH 302 Urban Principalities and the Spirit of the City, p. 69 

SCUPE M 300 January Term in Chicago, p. 7 1 

SCUPE M 305 Dimensions and Dynamics of Ministry, p. 74 

TEDS ME845 Leadership in the Urban Church, p. 7 1 

SPRING 

LSTC E-3 1 1 M.A. Issues Seminar: Response to Race and Ethnicity, p. 90 

M/L E338 The Democratic Faith, p. 90 

M/L M366 Arts of Ministry: Public Ministry, p. 93 

SCUPE M 304 Christology and Culture, p. 89 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 



FALL 

CTS CM 560 
G-ETS 21-636 
G-ETS 22-506 
M/L E438 
M/L M420 
MTS T-433 
TEDS ME675 

WINTER 

CTS CM 488 

CTU MP437 
TEDS ST738 

SPRING 

CTS TEC 481 
G-ETS 12-619 
LSTC H-465 
M/L E338 



Readings in Women, Psychology, Religion and Culture, p. 54 

Feminist Theology: A Systematic Perspective, p. 47 

Christian Ethics and Human Sexuality, p. 48 

Eco-Justice Citizenship, p. 49 

Liberation Theology and Critical Pedagogy, p. 57 

Feminist Theology, p. 47 

Women in Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 51 

Work, Love and Family in American Culture, p. 71 
Pastoral Counseling and the Female Counselee, p. 75 
Political Theologies, p. 69 

Sexual and Domestic Violence, p. 87 

New Testament Interpretation through Cross-Cultural Eyes, p. 84 

Women in Church History, p. 86 

The Democratic Faith, p. 90 



CHICAGO CENTER FOR GLOBAL MINISTRIES 

The listings in this section are for the three cooperating schools of CCGM; please refer to pp. 16-17. 

FALL 

CTU B 525 Rabbinic Judaism and Jesus' Jewish Background, p. 41 

CTU BC433 The Gospel of Mark in Cross-Cultural Perspective, p. 40 

CTU C 4 1 Mission: The Contemporary Challenge, p. 50 

CTU C 458 Hispanic Faith and Culture, p. 50 

CTU C 575f Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar, p. 50 

CTU CD460 U.S. Latino Theologies, p. 45 

CTU CH325 Models of Missionary Activity, p. 44 

CTU CMP54 1 Marriage and Family in Cross-Cultural Context, p. 54 

CTU D 508 Theology and Community, p. 46 

CTU DC442 Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry, p. 46 



103 



CTU E375f 
CTU EC402 
CTU EC588 
CTU M 409f 
CTU W 566 
CTU/MTS C 460f 
LSTC W-312 
LSTC W-428 
LSTC W-433 
LSTC W-529 
MTS E-416 
MTS E-432 
MTS H-300f 
MTS T-433 

WINTER 

CTU BC490 
CTU C 575w 
CTU CD445 
CTU CD465H 
CTU D445 
CTU DC441 
CTU DC448 
CTU DC605 
CTU DCS575 
CTU E432 
CTU EC545 
CTU/MTS C 460w 
LSTC E-432/ 

MTS E-424 
LSTC T-429 
LSTC W-427 
LSTC W-429 
LSTC W-531 
MTS H-330 

SPRING 

CTU C 300 
CTU C 505/ 

LSTC W-425 
CTU C 508 
CTU C 564 
CTU CD456 
CTU CW351 
CTU CW511 
CTU DC436 
CTU DC446 
CTU E375s 
CTU M409s 
CTU SB629 
LSTC E-311 
LSTC M-487 
LSTC W-513 
LSTC W-532 
MTS H-300s 
MTS H-421 
MTS M-333 
MTS T-439 



Introduction to Social Ethics, p. 48 

Natural Law and Christian Ethics, p. 48 

Seminar on Christ, Community and Christian Ethics, p. 49 

Ministry on the Margins, p. 5 1 

Ecumenical Issues in Worship, p. 55 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 50 

Epic of the Global Church, p. 50 

Towards Understanding Islam, p. 5 1 

Indigenous Religion and Mission in North America, p. 50 

The Life and Times of Mohammad, p. 51 

Justice In and For Families, p. 49 

Multiculturalism and Christian Ethics, p. 49 

Transformations of Christianity: A Foundational Course, p. 42 

Feminist Theology, p. 47 

Biblical Foundations for Mission, p. 71 
Mission/Ministry Integration Seminar, p. 72 
Toward a Hispanic Theology of Church, p. 72 
Teologia del ministerio en la comunidad hispana, p. 66 
Theology of the Church and its Ministry, p. 68 
Christology and Cultures, p. 68 
Marian Theology, Symbols and Inculturation, p. 68 
Constructing Local Theologies, p. 68 
Black Spirituality, p. 74 

Ethical Implications of the Holocaust/Genocide, p. 69 
Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience, p. 69 
Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry, p. 72 

Greening the Church, p. 70 

The Connection Between the Human Cultural Situation and Christology, p. 68 

Christian Mission in Ecumenical and Multi-Faith Contexts, p. 72 

World Religions, p. 72 

The Qur'an and its Interpreters, p. 73 

History of the Black Church in North America, p. 64 

The Experience of Religion, p. 91 

Globalization and the Mission of the Church Catholic, p. 91 

Mission Trends: Recent Theology, p. 92 

Literacy, Orality, Evangelization, p. 92 

God Images in Hispanic Religiosity, p. 88 

Introduction to Liturgy in a Cross-Cultural Context, p. 95 

Religious Experience of Initiation, p. 92 

Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness, p. 88 

Missionary Dynamics of the Church, p. 88 

Introduction to Social Ethics, p. 89 

Ministry on the Margins, p. 92 

Jewish Mysticism, Messianism and Spirituality, p. 94 

M.A. Issues Seminar: Response to Race and Ethnicity, p. 90 

Christian Ritual Music of Many Cultures, p. 96 

Full Communion: Approaches to Church Unity, p. 92 

Encounters and Clashes: Islam and Christianity in History, p. 92 

Transformations of Christianity: A Foundational Course, p. 85 

20th Century Christianity: Global Pentecostal ism, p. 85 

Pastoral Care in the Black Church, p. 95 

Theologies from Asia, p. 89 



104 



ACTS PERSONNEL 



Ghulam-Haider Aasi 
Islamic Studies 
Th.D., Temple University 



FACULTY AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

(LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 



Scott W. Alexander 

Ministry 

B.A., Lawrence University; M.Div 

School for the Ministry. 



(M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Starr King 



Frances M. Anderson (NPTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Christian Education 

B.S.N., University ofNebraska; B.R.E., North Park 
Theological Seminary; MA., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary and Northwestern University. 

Grant Anderson (NPTS) Adjunct Faculty in Christian 
Education 

B.Mus.Ed., American Conservatory of Music; 
M.Mus.Ed., De Paul University; Ed.D. cand., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Herbert Anderson (CTU) Professor of Pastoral 
Theology 

B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; B.D., Augustana 
Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University. 

Philip J. Anderson (NPTS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Phil., Regent's Park 
College, Oxford University. 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (MTS) Professor of Pastoral 
Care and Dean of Masters Program 
B.A., Princeton University; M.Th., D.Min., The 
University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Richard E. Averbeck (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., Calvary Bible College; M.Div., M.A., Grace 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Annenberg Research 
Institute, Dropsie College. 

Ruth Ann Bailey (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Eastern College; M.Div., Colgate Rochester 
Divinity School/Bexley Hall/Crozier Theological 
Seminary; Study: Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary; Institute for Clinical Social Work. 



Donald A. Baker (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.S., University of Illinois; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary. 

Henry Baldwin, F.S.C. (MS) Librarian 

M.Ed., St. Mary's College, Winona; M.L.S., George 
Peabody College; M.A., Immaculate Conception 
Seminary, Mahway, NJ. 

Mark P. Bangert (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of Worship and Music 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., S.T.M., 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota; Study: Indiana University ; 
Northwestern University; St. John's University. 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU/MTS) Professor of 
World Mission 

S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; S.T.D., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

Paula S. Datsko Barker (S-WTS) Associate Dean 
for Academic Affairs and Assistant Professor of 
Historical Theology 

B.Mus., University of Michigan; M.Div., Yale 
University; Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

Robert Barron (MS) Department of Systematics 
S.T.B., S.T.L., M.Div., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.A., The Catholic University of America; 
S.T.D., Institut Catholique de Paris. 

Dorothy C. Bass (CTS) Associate Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Union Theological 
Seminary and Columbia University; Ph.D., Brown 
University. 

Barry J. Beitzel (TEDS) Professor of Old Testament 
and Semitic Languages; Associate Academic Dean 
B.A., M.A., Bob Jones University; Ph.D., The 
Dropsie University. 

August J. Belauskas (MS) Director of P re-Theology 
Program; Instructor, Department of Pre-Theology; 
Associate Dean of Formation 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., 
Ph.D. cand., Loyola University, Chicago. 

Linda L. Belleville (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Biblical Literature 
B.M., University of Rochester, Eastman School of 



105 



Music; M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; 
Ph.D., University of St. Michael's College. 

Warren S. Benson (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education, Vice President of Professional Doctoral 
Programs and Director of the Doctor of Ministry 
Program 

B.A., Northwestern College; Th.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.R.E., Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Loyola 
University, Chicago. 

Michelle W. Bentley (MIL) Lecturer in Ministry 
Studies and Dean of Students 
B.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Northeast Illinois 
University; M.Div., Meadville/Lombard Theological 
School. 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies 

B.S., Marian College; M.A., Ph.D., St.. Louis 
University. 

Howard A. Berman (LSTC) Jewish Chautauqua 
Society Visiting Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.H.L., M.A.H.L., 
Hebrew Union College; Study: University of 
London; Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Leo 
Baeck College. 

Norman E. Bevan, C.S.Sp. (CTU) President 

C.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., 
Accademia Alfonsiana, Rome. 

Stephan Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Divine Word College; S.T.B., S.T.L., Pontifical 
Gregorian University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame; Study: University of Cambridge. 

Kathleen D. Billman (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.Div., Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Colleen Birchett (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Christian 
Education 

B.A., Wayne State University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Michigan. 

Phyllis A. Bird (G-ETS) Associate Professor of Old 
Testament Interpretation 

A.B., University of California at Berkeley; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Th.D., 
Harvard Divinity School; Study: University of 
Heidelberg. 



Mary R. Bischoff (LSTC/MTS) Director of the Jesuit- 
Krauss-McCormick Library; (MTS) Educational 
Administrator; (LSTC) Faculty Status 
B.A., University of Missouri; M.S. in L.S., 
University of Illinois; Study: Christ Seminary- 
Seminex; St. Louis University. 

Helen Bishop (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.S., University of Missouri; M.A. (Medieval and 
Renaissance Music), M.A. (Educational 
Technology), San Diego State University; Ed.D., 
University of San Diego. 

Reidar B. Bjornard (NBTS) Professor of Old 
Testament, Emeritus 

Cand. Theol., University of Oslo; Th.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Study: Uppsala 
University; American School of Oriental Research, 
Jerusalem. 

Richard Bliese (LSTC) Adjunct Professor of 
Evangelism and Missions; Associate Director of 
the Chicago Center for Global Ministries 
B.A., Wright State University; M.Div., Christ- 
Seminary-Seminex; Th.D. cand., Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago. 

Deborah A. Block (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Worship 
B.A., Carroll College; M.Div., Louisville 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Karen Bloomquist (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Church and Society 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Pacific Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; M.Phil., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York. 

Barbara E. Bowe, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Biblical Studies 
B.A., Manhattanville College; M.Ed., Boston 
College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; Th.D., 
Harvard University. 

Patrick J. Boyle, S.J. (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Christian Life 
M. A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., 
West Baden College; Ph.D., Marquette University. 

Robert L. Brawley (MTS) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Erskine College; S.T.M., Lutheran Theological 
Southern Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

John S. Bray (NPTS) Dean and Professor of Church 
History 
B.A., Wayne State University; M.Div., Fuller 



106 



Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford 
University; Study: University of Strasbourg; 
University of Geneva. 

Walter Brennan, O.S.M. (CTU) Lecturer in Theology 
B.A., Benbur Priory; M.A., Stonebridge Priory; 
M.A., Ph.D., DePaul University. 

Brent Bromstrup (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Ministry 

B.S., Seattle Pacific University; M.Div., 
Conservative Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Harold O. J. Brown (TEDS) Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology, Franklin Forman Chair 
of Christian Ethics and Theology 
B.A., Harvard University; S.T.B., Th.M, Harvard 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Harvard University; Study: 
Marburg University. 

Michael A. Bullmore (TEDS) Assistant Professorof 
Practical Theology 

Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Wheaton College; 
M.Div., Th.M., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Richard P. Busse (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., Valparaiso University; M.T.S., Th.M., Th.D. 
cand., Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

Alfloyd Butler (NBTS) Assistant Professor of 
Historical Theology 

B.S., Southern University; M.Div., Virginia Union 
University School ofTheology; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Sara Butler, M.S.B.T. (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Systematic Theology 
B.S., Fordham School of Education; M.A., The 
Catholic University of America; S.T.L., University 
of St. Mary of the Lake; Ph.D., Fordham University. 

Richard R. Caemmerer, Jr. (LSTC) Visiting 
Professor ofTheology and Art 
B.F.A., Washington University: M.F.A., Indiana 
University; Diploma, University of Heidelberg. 

George E. Cairns, Jr. (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Practical Theology and Spirituality; Director, 
Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 
University; M.Div., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Alva R. CaldweN (G-ETS) Librarian for Program 
and Planning, The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
and Associate Professor of Ministries 
B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 



Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; 
D.Min., Mundelein Seminary of the University of 
St. Mary of the Lake. 

Elizabeth F. Caldwell (MTS) Professor of Educational 
Ministry 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis; M.Ed., Vanderbilt 
University; Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary and Northwestern University; Study: 
Presbyterian School of Christian Education. 

Louis J. Cameli (MS) Professor, Department of 
Christian Life 
S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 

Nigel M. de S. Cameron (TEDS) Senior Vice 
President of Doctoral Programs/ Academic 
Planning; Associate Professor of Biblical and 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., M.A., Emmanuel College, University of 
Cambridge; B.D., Ph.D., New College, University 
ofEdinburgh. 

Cynthia M. Campbell (MTS) President 

B.A., Occidental College; M.Div., Harvard Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Southern Methodist University. 

Edward F. Campbell (MTS) Francis A. McGaw 
Professor of Old Testament 
B.A., Yale University; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

John F. Canary (MS) Rector 

M.A.S., University of San Francisco; S.T.L., D.Min., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Richard W. Carlson (NPTS) Professor of Ministries 
and Director of Field Education 
B.A., North Park College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Study: North 
Park Theological Seminary. 

Donald A. Carson (TEDS) Research Professor of 
New Testament 

B.S., McGill University; M.Div., Central Baptist 
Seminary; Ph.D., Cambridge University. 

Anna Case-Winters (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Church 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.Div., Columbia 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt Universjty. 

Giacomo Casese (LSTC) Instructor in Theology 
B.A., Seminario Evangelico Asociado, Venezuela; 
M.A.Th.S., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Th.D. cand., Lutheran School ofTheology at 
Chicago. 



107 



Jungsik Cha (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in New 
Testament 

B.A., Seoul National University; M.Div., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., 
The University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Peter Cha (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Christian 
Education 

B.A., The University of Chicago; M.Div., Th.M., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Peter T. Cha (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., The University of Chicago; M.Div., Th.M., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D. cand., 
Northwestern University. 

Ian M. Chapman (NBTS) President and Professor 
of Preaching 

B.A., University of Hawaii; B.D., Eastern Baptist 
Theological Semiinary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of 
California, Santa Barbara; Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Donald Franklin Chatfield (G-ETS) Professor of 
Preaching; (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Preaching 
A.B., Yale University; B.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh 

James Christian (LSTC) Instructor in Ministry 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Christ 
Seminary-Seminex. 

Hearn Chun (MTS) Assistant Professor of Ministry 
and Theological Studies and Associate Director 
of the Korean-American Ministries Center 
B.A., Seoul National University; B.D., Perkins 
School of Theology; Th.M., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Study: The University of Chicago. 

William P. Clemmons (NBTS) Myers Professor of 
Pastor alMinistry and Director of the Grow Center 
for the Renewal of the Churches 
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.A., Duquesne 
University; M.R.E., M.Div., Ed.D., Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Study: Universita' Italiana 
per Stranieri, Italy; Univesita degli Study, Rome; 
George Peabody College for Teachers, Vanderbilt 
University. 

William K. Cober (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Ministry 

A.B., Colgate University; B.D.„ Andover Newton 
Theological School; D.D. (Hon.), Ottawa University. 

Mary Lou Codman-Wilson (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 
A.B., Goucher College; M.A., Wheaton College; 



M.T.S., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Robert E.Coleman (TEDS) Professor of Evangelism 
and Director of the School of World Mission and 
Evangelism 

B.A., Southwestern University; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Tom W. Collins (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Church Planting and Associate Dean 
B.A.Ed., Central Washington University; M.Div., 
North Park Theological Seminary; D.Min., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Robert L.Conrad (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of Educational Ministry; Director, 
Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. 
Louis; M.A. in Education, Washington University; 
Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Charles D. Cooper (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Olivet Nazarene University; M.Div., 
Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; D.Min., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

David Cort£s-Fuentes (MTS) Director, Hispanic 
Ministries Program 

B.S., Recinto Universitario de Mayaguez, (UPR); 
M.Div., Seminario Evangelico de Puerto Rico; 
Th.M., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia; 
Ph.D. cand., Northwestern University. 

Charles H. Cosgrove (NBTS) Associate Professor 
of New Testament 

B.A., Bethel College; M.Div., Bethel Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Study: University of Tubingen; ISEDET, Buenos 
Aires. 

Jeffrey Crafton (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor of Biblical 
Languages 

B.A., University of Kansas; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; M.T.S., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary/Northwestern University; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary. 

Edward J. Cronin (MS) Associate Dean of Formation 
B. A., Niles College of Loyola University; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A.S., 
University of San Francisco. 

Roger Cr urn (LSTC) Instructor in Ministry 

B.S., Wisconsin State University; M.Div., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago. 



108 



David D. Daniels III (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., Bowdoin College; M.Div., Yale University 
Divinity School; PH.D., Union Theological 
Seminary, New York. 

William J. Danker (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of Missions, Emeritus 
Diploma, Concordia College, Milwaukee; Diploma, 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Wheaton 
College; D.Theol. University of Heidelberg; Study: 
The University of Chicago. 

Donald W. Dayton (NBTS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

B.A., Houghton College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.S. in L.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., 
The University of Chicago; Study: Columbia 
University; Union Theological Seminary, New York; 
American Institute of Holy Land Studies; Asbury 
Theological Seminary; University of Tubingen. 

Mary K. Deeley (S-WTS) Visiting Assistant Professor 
in Old Testament 

B.Mus., Rosary College; M.Div., Yale University; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Mario DiCicco, O.F.M. (CTU) Adjunct Assistant 
Professor of New Testament; (LSTC) Visiting 
Lecturer in Bible 

B.A., Quincy University; M.A., The University of 
Chicago; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.A., 
Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., Case Western 
Reserve University; Th.M., Th.D., Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago. 

David E. Dillon (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Judson College; 
B.A., Aurora College; M.Ed., Ed.D., Northern 
Illinois University. 

Joseph Byung-II Doh (MTS) Adjunct Professor in 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Keimyung University; M.A., Yonsei 
University Graduate School of Theology; M.Ed., 
University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Study: 
Seoul National University; San Francisco 
Theological Seminary; Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Eleanor Doidge, L.O.B. (CTU/MTS) Coordinator 
of Cr oss-Cultural Studies, (MTS) Associate 
Professor of Mission and Ministry 
B.A., Carlow College; M.A., Catholic Theological 
Union; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary; 
Study: Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 



John V. Dolciamore (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Christian Life 
B.A., M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; J.C.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome. 

Perry G. Downs (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Director of the Doctor of Education 
Program; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of Christian 
Education 

Dip., Miami Christian College; B.S., Philadelphia 
College of Bible; M. A., Ph.D., New York University. 

John L. Dreibelbis (S-WTS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Ministries 

A.B., The University of Chicago; M.Div., Seabury- 
Western Theological Seminary; Ph.D., The Divinity 
School, The University of Chicago. 

Ruth Duck (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of Worship 
B.A., Rhodes College; M.Div., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; M.A., University of Notre Dame; Th.D., 
Boston University School of Theology; D.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Robert G. Duffett (NBTS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Communication and Director of 
Doctoral Studies 

B.A., Bethel College; M.Div., Bethel Theological 
Seminary; M.Th., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Richard R. Dunn (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., Bryan College; M.A., Ed.D., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

A. Royce Eckhardt (NPTS) Lecturer in Hymnology 
B.M., North Park College; M.M., University of 
Hartford. 

W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) Associate Professor of 
Ministry 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.Div., Ph.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) Professor of Social Ethics 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University; B.D., Meadville/ 
Lombard Theological School; M.A., Ph.D., The 
University of Chicago. 

Toinette M. Eugene (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Social Ethics 

B.A., University of San Francisco; M.A., Jesuit 
School of Theology, Berkeley and Graduate 
Theological Union; Ph..D., Graduate Theological 
Union. 



109 



Ian Evison (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., Carleton College; D.Min., Meadville/Lombard 
Theological School; M.A., Ph.D., cand., The 
University of Chicago. 

John S. Feinberg (TEDS) Professor of Biblical and 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; 
M.Div., Talbot Theological Seminary; Th.M., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., 
The University of Chicago. 

Paul D. Feinberg (TEDS) Professor of Biblical and 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; B.D., 
Th.M., Talbot Theological Seminary; Th.D., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Roosevelt University; 
Ph.D. cand., The University of Chicago. 

Bruce L. Fields (TEDS) Assistant Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.Div., Th.M., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., 
Marquette University. 

Leon Finney (MTS) Director, African-American 
Leadership Program 

M.A., Goddard College; M.A.T.S., D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Robert M. Finster (S-WTS) Director of Music and 
Lecturer in Church Music 
B.A., Occidental College; M.Mus., D.M.A., 
Eastman School of Music of the University of 
Rochester. 

Brian J. Fischer , (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Liturgy and Sacraments 

M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; S.L.D. 
cand., University of S. Anselmo, Rome. 

Neal E. Fisher (G-ETS) President and Professor of 
Theology and Society 

A.B., DePauw University; M.Div., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D., Boston 
University Graduate School; Litt.D., De Pauw 
University; S.T.D., MacMurray College; D.D., Coe 
College. 

Geraldine A. Flynn (MS) Director of Field Education 
B. A., DePaul University; M.A., Loyola University; 
D.Min., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Edward Foley, O.F.M. Cap. (CTU) Professor of 
Liturgy and Music and Director ofD. Min. Program 
B.A., St. Joseph's College; M.Div., St. Francis 
Seminary; M.Mus., University of Wisconsin; M.A. 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 



Dorothy Folliard, O.P. (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Scripture and Theology 
B.A., Siena Heights College; M.A., Loyola 
University, Chicago; M.A.R.S., The University of 
Chicago; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Allan Forsman (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.Ed., C.A.G.S., 
Springfield College; Ph.D., Drew University; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary; George Williams 
College; University of Massachusetts. 

Richard Fragomeni (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Liturgy and Preaching 

B.A., Siena College; S.T.B., M.A., University of 
Louvain; M.A., Ph.D., M.Mus., The Catholic 
University of America. 

Mark Francis, C.S.V. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Liturgy 

B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., M.A., 
Catholic Theological Union; S.L.L., S.L.D., 
Pontifical Liturgical Institute of St. Anselm, Rome. 

David J. Frenchak (SCUPE) President 

B. A., Toccoa Falls Bible College; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Andover Newton 
Theological School. 

Terence E. Fretheim (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
Old Testament 

B.A., Luther College, Decorah; M.Div., Luther 
Seminary; Th.D., Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Mary Frohlich (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Spirituality 

B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Ph.D., The Catholic 
University of America. 

Wesley J. Fuerst (LSTC) Professor of Old Testament 
A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., Central 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Th.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Midland Lutheran 
College; Study: University of Erlangen. 

Neil W. Gerdes (CTS) and (M/L) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M. A., Columbia University; M.A.L.S., 
The University of Chicago; D.Min., University of 
St. Mary of the Lake. 

Kendyl L. R. Gibbons (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., The 
University of Chicago; D.Min., Meadville/Lombard 
Theological School. 



110 



Thomas J. Gilbert (LSTC) Associate Director, 
Chicago Center for Religion and Science; Adjunct 
Professor of Religion and Science Studies 
B.S., M.S., California Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
Illinois Institute of Technology. 

Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Professor of 
Theological Anthropology 
M.A. (Anthropology), MA. (Linguistics), Ph.D., 
University of Edinburgh; Study: University of 
Cambridge. 

John Charles Godbey (M/L) Professor of Church 
History 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Federated Theological Faculty, The University of 
Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Chicago; 
S.T.D., Protestant Theological Institute, Cluj, 
Romania; Study: Polish Academy of Sciences. 

Judith M. Golz (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Ph.D., New York 
University. 

Robert E.Goss (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Holy Cross College; M.Div., Weston School 
of Theology; Th.D., Harvard University. 

Stephen Ray Graham (NPTS) Associate Professor 
of American Church History 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton Graduate 
School; Ph.D., The University of Chicago Divinity 
School. 

James E. Griffiss (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., M.A., The Johns Hopkins University; S.T.B., 
The General Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

Dennis E. Groh (G-ETS) Professor of the History of 
Christianity (Patristics) 

B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Heidi Hadsell (MTS) Professor of Christian Ethics 
and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dean of 
the Faculty 

B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., 
Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California, Los Angeles. 

Loren Hagen (G-ETS/S-WTS) Catalog Librarian, 
The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., M.Libr., University of 
Washington. 



Hugh F. Halverstadt (MTS) Professor of Ministry 
B.A., King College; B.D., Union Theological 
Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

YunChun Han (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Old 
Testament 

B.S., Yonsei University, Seoul; M.Div., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of Notre 
Dame. 

Adolf M. Hansen (G-ETS) Vice President for 
Administration and Associate Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., S.T.M., New York 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Nancy A. Hardesty (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.S.J., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

James Hargleroad (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.Sc, University ofNebraska; Study: McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

M. Susan Harlow (M/L) Assistant Professor of 
Religious Education 

B.A., Hollins College; M.Div., Andover Newton 
Theological School; Th.M., Harvard University; 
Ed.D., Columbia University. 

Murray J. Harris (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament Exegesis and Theology 
B.A., M.A., University of New Zealand; Dip.Th., 
University of London; Dip. Ed., University of 
Auckland; B.D., University of Otago; Ph.D., 
University of Manchester. 

Thomas Hawkins (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Ministry and Dean of Doctoral Programs 
B.A., Eastern Illinois University; M.A., Indiana 
University; M.Div., Christian Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Harvard University; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ed.D., University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign. 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Doctrinal 
Theology and Director of M.A. Program 
B.A., Quincy College; Dr. Theol., Friedrich-Wilhelm 
University, Bonn; Litt.D., St. Bonaventure 
University; Litt.D., Quincy College. 

Warren J. Heard, Jr. (TEDS) Adjunct Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.S., Southern Methodist University; Dip., Moody 
Bible Institute; M.Div., Th.M., Trinity Evangelical 



111 



Divinity School; Ph.D., University of Aberdeen; 
Ed.D. cand., Northern Illinois University. 

Philip J. Hefner (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology; Director, Chicago Center for Religion 
and Science 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., The 
Univesity of Chicago; L.H.D., Midland Lutheran 
College; Fulbright Scholar at University of 
Tubingen. 

Kurt K. Hendel (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of Reformation History 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Concordia 
Seminary, St.Louis; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State 
University; Fulbright Scholar at University of 
Gottingen. 

Lawrence R. Hennessey (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Church History 
B.A., Holy Trinity Mission Seminary; S.T.B., M.A., 
S.T.L., School of Theology, The Catholic University 
of America; M.A., Ph.D., Graduate School of Arts 
and Sciences, Catholic University of America. 

Carl F. H. Henry (TEDS) Visiting Professor of Biblical 
and Systematic Theology 
A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Th.D., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Boston 
University; Litt.D., Seattle Pacific College; Litt.D., 
Wheaton College; L.H.D., Houghton College. 

Carol A. Hepokoski (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in Social 
Ethics 

B.A., Goucher College; M.Div., Starr King School 
for the Ministry. 

Hutz H. Hertzberg (TEDS) Dean of the Chapel 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton Graduate 
School; M.A.R., D.Min., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School. 

Thomas E. Hickey (MS) Dean of Formation 

M.Div., D.Min. cand., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.Chr.Sp., Creighton University. 

Paul G. Hiebert (TEDS) Professor of Mission and 
Anthropology and Director of Ph.D. in 
Intercultural Studies 

B.A., Tabor College; M.A., Mennonite Brethren 
Biblical Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota. 

Theodore Hiebert (MTS) Visiting Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.A., Fresno Pacific College; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard University. 



David K. Himrod (G-ETS/S-WTS) Assistant 
Librarian for Reader Services, The United Library, 
G-ETS/S-WTS 

B.S., California Institute of Technology; M.Th., 
School of Theology atClaremont; Ph.D., University 
of California, Los Angeles. 

Kenneth E. Hindman (MTS) Jean W. and Frank T 
Mohr, Jr. Professor of Ministry 
B.A., Park College; M.Div., D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

John E. Hinkle, Jr. (G-ETS) Professor of Pastoral 
Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., Taylor University; B.D., Garrett Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University (in 
cooperation with Garrett Theological Seminary); 
Diplomate, American Association of Pastoral 
Counselors. 

David A. Hogue (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Psychology 

B.A., Greenville College; M.S.Ed., Indiana State 
University; M.Div., Christian Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University (in cooperation with 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary). 

Paul A. Holloway (LSTC) Instructor in Greek 

A.B., The University of Texas; M.A., Rice 
University; Ph.D. cand., The University of Chicago. 

Paul L. Holmer (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

Fredrick Holmgren (NPTS) Research Professor of 
Old Testament 

A.B., Calvin College; B.D., S.T.M., Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; Study: North 
Park Theological Seminary. 

Leslie J. Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies 

B.A., St.. Francis College; M.A., Aquinas Institute 
of Theology; Ph.D., Northwestern University and 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

David G. Horner (NPTS) President 

B.A., Barrington College; M.A., University of Rhode 
Island; M.B.A., Ph.D., Stanford University. 

Estella Boggs Horning (NBTS) Affiliate Professor 
of Biblical Studies 

B.A., Manchester College; R.N., Presbyterian-St. 
Luke's Hospital; M.Div., Bethany Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 



112 



David M. Howard, Jr. (TEDS) Associate Professor 
of Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.S., Geneva College; M.A., Wheaton College; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan; Study: Bethel 
Theological Seminary. 

John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Church Law 

B.A., St. Louis University; M.A., M.Div., Catholic 
Theological Union; J.C.B., J.C.L., J.C.D., The 
Catholic University of America. 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Professor of 
Liturgy 

B.A., Newton College; M.A., The Catholic 
University of America; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame. 

W.Bingham Hunter (TEDS) Academic Dean, Senior 
Vice President of Education, Professor of New 
Testament 

B.S., M.S., Michigan State University; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., Aberdeen 
University. 

Reinhard Hiitter (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Ethics 

M.Div. equiv., University of Erlangen; Th.M., Duke 
University; Dr.theol., University of Erlangen; Study: 
University of Bonn. 

Everett Jackson (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.S., Roosevelt University; M.Ed., Northern Illinois 
University; M.Div., Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary; 
CPE, Community Hospital of Evanston, St. Francis 
Hospital of Evanston; Study: Northern Illinois 
University. 

Steven R. Janco (MS) Director of Music; Instructor, 
Department of Liturgy and Sacraments 
M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.C.M., Concordia University, River Forest. 

E. Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) Professor of Education 
and Ministry, Emeritus 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., The University 
of Chicago; Study: Harvard University; Oxford 
University. 

Theodore W.Jennings (CTS) Professor of Theology 
A.B., Duke University; B.D., Ph.D., Emory 
University. 

Richard Jensen (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
Preaching 
B.A., Dana College; M.Div., Wartburg Theological 



Seminary; S.T.M., Chicago Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Aquinas Institute. 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) Harry R. Kendall Professor 
of New Testament Interpretation 
B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary /University of Chicago; Dr. 
theol., University of Tubingen; D.D., Morningside 
College; D.D., Kalamazoo College. 

Evelyn Johnson (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 
B.A., M.A. in Ed., University of Nebraska. 

Emma J. Justes (NBTS) Professor of Pastoral Care 
and Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Franklin College of Indiana; B.D., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School; Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Franklin College of 
Indiana. 

Cynthia JUrisson (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
American Church History 
B.A., St.. Olaf College; M.Div., Luther Northwestern 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Howard Kang (MTS) Professor of Ministry and 
Director of the Korean-American Ministries Center 
A.B., Soonjun University; B.D., Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, Seoul; S.T.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Illinois 
at Chicago Circle; D.Min., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; Study: The University of Chicago 
Divinity School. 

Kenneth S. Kantzer (TEDS) Dean Emeritus and 
Distinguished Professor of Biblical and Systematic 
Theology 

A.B., Ashland College; A.M., Ohio State University; 
B.D., S.T.M., Faith Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Harvard University. 

Deborah Kapp (MTS) Assistant Professor in the Field 
of Ministry 

A.B., Brown University; M.Div., Union Theological 
Seminary. 

John M. Kaserow, M.M. (CTU) Professor of Mission 
Studies and Coordinator for World Mission 
M.Th., M.Div., Maryknoll School of Theology; 
M.A., University ofNotre Dame; Ph.D., Uni\iersity 
of St.. Michael's College, Toronto. 

Calvin Katter, Jr. (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Biblical Literature 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Fuller Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 



113 



Louis F.Kavar (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., M.A., Duquesne Universtiy; Ph.D., University 
ofPittsburgh. 

Rosemary Skinner Keller (G-ETS) Professor of 
Religion and American Cultural Studies and Dean 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.R.E., Yale Divinity 
School; M.A., Chicago State University; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois at Chicago. 

William Kellermann (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., North Central College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary. 

Keith Killinger (LSTC) Instructor in Church History 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Christ 
Seminary-Seminex; Th.D., Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago. 

John F. Kilner (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Bioethics and Contemporary Culture; Director of 
Bannockburn Institute for Christianity and 
Contemporary Culture 

B.A., Yale University; M.Div., Gordon-Conwell 
Theological Seminary; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University. 

Dai Kyun Kim (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Preaching 
and Worship 

B.Th., Th.M., Yonsei University; M.Div., 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Seoul; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Ralph W. Klein (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of Old Testament; Dean 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis; Th.D., Harvard University; 
Study: University of Michigan; University of 
Gottingen; Kirchliche Hochschule, Berlin. 

Tae-Hy ung Ko (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in the Field 
of Ministry 

B.A., Yonsei University; M.Div., Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, Seoul; Th.M., Columbia 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Drew University; 
Ed.D. cand., Presbyterian School of Christian 
Education. 

Jane K. Koonce (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Baylor University; M.A., Columbia University 
Teachers College; M.P.S., Loyola University; Study; 
St. George's College, Jerusalem; University of 
California, Berkeley. 

Paul E. Koptak (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Communication and Biblical Interpretation, Paul 



and Bernice Brandel Chair in Preaching 
A.B., Rutgers University; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary and Northwestern University; 
Study: Regent College; Westminster Theological 
Seminary. 

Edgar M.Krentz (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor of New Testament 
B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., 
Ph.D., Washington University; Study: The 
University of Chicago; American School of Classical 
Studies, Athens; University of Tubingen. 

Andre LaCocque (CTS) Professor of Old Testament 
and Director, Center for Jewish-Christian Studies 
D.Litt., D.Theol., University of Strasbourg. 

David L. Larsen (TEDS) Professor of Practical 
Theology 

B.A., Stanford University; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Trinity College; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Roy Larson (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary. 

Spencer Lavan (M/L) Dean and Chief Executive; 
Professor, Comparative and Applied Religion 
B.A., Tufts University; B.D., Harvard Divinity 
School; M.A., Ph.D., McGill University. 

Eugene A. LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU) and (MS) 
Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, New Testament and 
Early Christian Literature 
M.A., John Carroll University; S.T.L., University 
of Fribourg; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute; 
Eleve Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, Jerusalem; M.A., 
Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

Jong Min Lee (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Korean 
Church History 

Th.B., Th.M., Han Kuk Theological Seminary; 
M.Div., Winebrenner Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Leo D. Lefebure (MS) Dean of the Canonical Faculty 
and Professor, Department ofSystematics 
S.T.B., M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

Perry D. LeFevre (CTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Theology 

B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., The University of 
Chicago. 



114 



Timothy Lenchak, S.V.D. (CTU) Adjunct Assistant 
Professor of Old Testament 
B.S., Divine Word College; M.A. Catholic 
Theological Union; S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian 
University. 

William E. Lesher (LSTC) President 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; D.D.., California 
Lutheran University; D.D., Pacific Lutheran 
University; D.D., Wittenberg University. 

David L. Lindberg (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
World Mission and World Religions 
A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., The 

University of Chicago. 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) Adjunct Associate 
Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Georgetown University; S.T.B., M.A., S.T.L., 
S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Wilhelm C. Linss (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of New 
Testament 

B.D. (equiv.), University of Erlangen; Th.D., Boston 
University School of Theology; Study: University 
of Miinster; University of Michigan. 

Charles H. Lippy (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Dickinson College; M.Div., Union Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Jerome E. Listecki (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Christian Life 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; J.C.L., 
J.C.D., S.T.D. cand., Pontifical University of St. 
Thomas Aquinas, Rome; J.D., DePaul University. 

Lois Gehr Livezey (MTS) Professor of Christian 
Ethics 

B.A., Smith College; M.A., Columbia University/ 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; M.A., 
Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

John G. Lodge (MS) Assistant Professor, Department 
of Sacred Scripture 

M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A., University of Illinois, Chicago; S.S.L., 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; S.T.D. cand., 
Gregorian University, Rome. 

Crawford W. Loritts, Jr. (TEDS) Visiting Instructor 
in Urban Ministry 
Study: Philadelphia College of the Bible. 

JeanetteLucinio,S.P. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Religious Education and Director of MA. P. S. 



Program and Director of Field Education 
B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.A., 
Mundelein College, M.Div., Catholic Theological 
Union; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Milo D. Lundell (TEDS) Executive Vice President of 
Operations 

B. A., St. Paul Bible College; B.D., D.Min., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Kevin J. Madigan (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., College of Holy Cross; M.A., University of 
Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

Dennis R. Magary (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., Fort Wayne Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D. cand., University 
ofWisconsin. 

Helen Kenik Mainelli (NBTS) Professor of 
Theological Bibliography and Director of the 
Seminary Library 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S., Barry University; 
MLIS, University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., St. 
Louis University. 

Judith G. Mannheim (M/L) Instructor of Religious 
Education and Associate Dean, Modified 
Residency Program 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.Div., Andover 
Newton Theological School. 

Paul Manz (LSTC) Christ Seminary-Seminex 
Professor Emeritus of Church Music and Artist in 
Residence 

B.S. in Ed., Concordia College, River Forest; M.M., 
Northwestern University; Fulbright Scholar, First 
Prize in Organ and Improvisation, Royal Flemish 
Conservatory at Antwerp, Belgium; LLitt.D., 
Concordia College, Seward; D.Mus. (Hon.), 
Carthage College; L.H.D., Christ Seminary- 
Seminex. 

Claude F. Mariottini (NBTS) Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.A., California Baptist College; M.Div., Golden 
Gate Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Study; Graduate 
Theological Union. 

Elmer A. Martens (TEDS) Visiting Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.A., University of Saskatchewan; B.Ed., University 
of Manitoba; B.D., Mennonite Brethren Biblical 
Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School. 



115 



B.Herbert Martin (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Philander Smith College; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Felipe Martinez (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching 

B.A., Austin College; M.Div., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

Howard C. Matson (TEDS) Director of Placement 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.Div., D.Min., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Donald H. Matthews (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Church and Society 

B.S., M.A., Northwestern University; M.Div., Pacific 
School of Religion; Ph.D., The University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 

John J. McDonnell (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Systematic Theology 
B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.B., M.Div., 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; SEOL, 
Oriental Institute, Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian 
University. 

Carol Ann McGibbon (SCUPE) Executive Vice- 
President 

B.A., Acadia University; M.Div., Acadia Divinity 
College. 

James P. Mcllhone (MS) Associate Professor, 
Department of Sacred Scripture; Associate 
Academic Dean 

M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
Ph.D., Marquette University. 

Duncan Mcintosh (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Ministry 

B.Mus.Ed., Houghton College; B.D., Th.M., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Eastern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. 

David J. McKay (TEDS) Adjunct Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., University of 
Illinois, Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., Loyola University, 
Chicago. 

LoisMcKinney (TEDS) Professor of Mission 

B.A., Biola University; M.R.E., Denver Seminary; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University; Study: Toronto 
Institute of Linguistics, Univesidade de Coimbra, 
Portugal; Universidade de Lisbon; Wheaton College 
Graduate School. 



Veronica Mendez, R.CJ3. (MS) Director of Hispanic 
Ministry 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.T.S., Jesuit 
School of Theology at Berkeley. 

Charles R. Meyer (MS) Professor Emeritus, 
Departments of Systematic Theology and Church 
History 

M.A., S.T.D., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
B.S., Library Science, Rosary College; Study: 
Vatican Library; Gregorian University, Rome. 

Kenneth M. Meyer (TEDS) Chancellor 

Dip., B.D., Trinity Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
Luther Rice University. 

Walter L. Michel (LSTC) Professor of Old Testament 
B.D. (equiv.), University of Vienna; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin; Study: University of 
Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; Western Michigan University; Yale 
University; Pontifical Biblical Institute; Loyola 
University. 

Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore (CTS) Associate 
Professor of Religion, Personality and Culture 
B.A., Kalamazoo College; M.A., Ph.D., The 
University of Chicago. 

Margaret M. Mitchell (MTS) Associate Professor 
of New Testament 

B.A., Manhattanville College; M.A., Ph.D., The 
University of Chicago; Study: Boston College. 

Douglas J. Moo (TEDS) Professor of New Testament 
and Director of Doctor of Philosophy in 
Theological Studies Program 
B.A., DePauw University; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University of 
St. Andrews. 

Robert L. Moore (CTS) Professor of Psychology and 
Religion 

B.A., Hendrix College; M.Th., Southern Methodist 
University; M.Th., Duke University; MA.., Ph.D., 
The University of Chicago; Diplomate, Alfred Adler 
Institute of Chicago; Diplomate, C.G.Jung Institute 
ofChicago. 

Osvaldo L Mottesi (NBTS) Professor of Religion 
and Society and Director of Hispanic Studies 
B.S., Instituto Politdcnico Otto Krause, Buenos 
Aires; L.Soc, Universidad Argentina de Ciencias 
Sociales; B.Teol., Seminario Biblico 
Latinoamericano, San Jos6, Costa Rica; Th.M., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Emory 
University; Study: Seminario Internacional 



116 



Teol6gico Bautista, Buenos Aires; Princeton 
University. 

Deborah F. Mullen (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Ministry and Historical Studies and Associate 
Dean of Masters Programs for Experiential 
Education 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.Div., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School/Bexley Hall/Crozer 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., The University 
ofChicago. 

Larry G. Murphy (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
the History of Christianity 
B.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union. 

William R. Myers (CTS) Academic Dean and 
Professor of Christian Education 
M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; M.Ed., 
Rhode Island College; Ed.D., Loyola University of 
Chicago. 

William R. Myers (NBTS) President Emeritus 
B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; D.D., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; L.D.H., Sioux 
Empire College; Ed.D. (Hon.), Judson College; 
Study: Union Theological Seminary; Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Robert K. Myers, Jr. (S-WTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Illinois College, Jacksonville; M.Div., 
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Ethics 

B.A., Quincy College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; Ph.D., University ofChicago; 
Study: University of Cambridge. 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) Research Professor of 
Christian Ethics 

A.B., Brown Univesrsity; B.D., Yale University 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Northwestern University and 
Garrett Theological Seminary; Study: North Park 
Theological Seminary; The University ofChicago. 

William R. Nelson (NBTS) Professor of Ministry and 
Director of Supervised Ministry 
B.S., College of Charleston; B.D., Th.M., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Fulbright Scholar, University 
ofHeidelberg. 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) Society of the Divine 



Word Scholar in Residence and Adjunct Professor 
of Church History 

L.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian University; M.A., The 
Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University 
of Cambridge. 

Harold A. Netland (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Philosophy of Religion and Mission, Naomi A. 
Fausch Chair of Missions 
B.A., Biola College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School. 

Thomas J. Nettles (TEDS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Mississippi College; M.Div., Ph.D., 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Gary Neville, O.Praem.. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Church Law and Registrar 
B.A., St.Norbert College; M.Div., Catholic 
Theological Union; B.C.L., M.C.L., Ph.D., 
University of Ottawa; B.C.L., J.C.L., J.C.D., St. 
Paul University, Ottawa. 

Morris J. Niedenthal (LSTC) Professor of Preaching 
B.S., Northwestern University; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Fulbright Scholar at 
Manchester University. 

Carol M.Noren (NPTS) Wesley W.Nelson Associate 
Professor of Homiletics 

B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

John W. Nyquist (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Evangelism and Director of Mission and 
Evangelism Internship Program 
B.A., M.A., California State University; M.A., 
M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Kenneth 0'Malley,C.P. (CTU) Director of Library 
and Professor of Bibliography 
A.M.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois; Study: University of Detroit; Loyola 
University, Chicago; Saint Louis University; 
Spalding College. 

James Okoye, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Visiting Scholar 

B.D., Ewgu, Nigeria; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Oxford 
University; L.S.S., Pontifical Biblical Institute, 
Rome. 

Theodore M. Olsen (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology 

B.A., Rockford College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; Study: University of Iowa. 



117 



Diane Olson (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., University of Minnesota; M.C.E., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

KarlA.Olsson (NPTS) President Emeritus 

M.A., Ph.D., The University of Chicago; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr. (TEDS) Assistant Professor 
of Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., Wheaton College; Th.M, Dallas Theological 
Seminary; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; 
Ph.D., University of Aberdeen. 

Grant R. Osborne (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor in New 
Testament 

B.A., Fort Wayne Bible College; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University of 
Aberdeen. 

Carolyn A. Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Professor of New 
Testament Studies 

B.A., Fontbonne College, St. Louis; MAT., 
Manhattanville College; Th.D., Harvard University. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Liturgy 
and Director of M.Div. Program 
S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum 
Antonianum, Rome; Study: Harvard University; 
University of California. 

Jane Marie Osterholt, S.P. (CTU) Adjunct Lecturer 
in Religious Education 

M.E.D., Marygrove College; D.Min., University of 
St. Mary of the Lake. 

Chang Hwan Park (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Biblical Studies 

B.A., Hong Ik University; Th.B., Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, Seoul; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Litt.D., Whitworth College. 

Eung-Chun Park (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in New 
Testament 

B.A., Seoul National University; M.Div., 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary; M.S.T., Yale 
University; Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

Thomas D. Parker (MTS) Cyrus H. McCormick 
Professor of Systematic Theology 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; B.D., San 
Francisco Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of Munich. 

John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Ethics 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., The 
University of Chicago. 



Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) Chautauqua 
Professor of Jewish Studies 
B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., Jewish 
Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L., Hebrew 
Union College -Jewish Institute of Religion; D.D., 
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, 
Cincinnati. 

Arturo Perez (CTU) Adjunct Instructor in Liturgy 
B.A., M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A., University of Notre Dame. 

Albert P. Pero, Jr. (LSTC) Professor of Theology 
and Cross-Cultural Studies 
A.B., M.A., University of Detroit; B.Th., Concordia 
Theological Seminary, Springfield, IL; S.T.D., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

Richard Perry (LSTC) Instructor in Church and 
Society 

B.A., Carthage College; M.Div., Th.M., Th.D. cand., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

Richard I. Pervo (S-WTS) Professor of New 
Testament and Patristics 

B.A., Concordia College; B.D., Episcopal 
Theological School; Th.D., Harvard University. 

John E. Phelan, Jr. (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
New Testament 

B.A., Trevecca Nazarene College; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Jamie T. Phelps, O.P. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology and Director of Augustus 
Tolton Program 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S. W., University of 
Illinois; M.A., St. John's University; Ph.D., The 
Catholic University of America. 

Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Pastoral Theology and Director of 
Hispanic Ministry 

M.A., Catholic Theological Union; S.T.D., 
Universidad Pontificia de Salamunca. 

Silas Pinto (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.Th., Presbyterian Independent Theological 
Seminary, Brazil; M.Th., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; D.Min., cand., McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 

Robert J. Price (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Ministry 

B.Ed., M.Ed., University of Illinois; M.A., 
Governors State University. 



118 



Lallene J. Rector (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Psychology of Religion and Pastoral Psychotherapy 
B.A., Texas Christian University; M.T.S., Ph.D., 
Boston University. 

Jerold F. Reed (NPTS) Milton B. Engebretson 
Associate Professor of Church Growth and 
Evangelism 

B.S., University of California, Davis; M.Div., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; Study: North 
Park Theological Seminary. 

Gene Reeves (M/L) Professor of Theology 

A.B., University ofNew Hampshire; S.T.B., Boston 
University; Ph.D., Emory University. 

Barbara Reid, O.P. (CTU) Associate Professor of 

New Testament Studies 

B.A., M.A., Aquinas College; Ph.D., The Catholic 

University of America. 

Michael D. Reynolds (TEDS) Director of Master of 
Arts in Religion Program, Emphasis in Urban 
Ministry 
B.S., Illinois State University. 

David M. Rhoads (LSTC) Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Gettysburg College; M. A., Oxford University; 
B.D.., Gettysburg Lutheran Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 
University. 

GaryRiebe-EstreIla,S.V.D. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Hispanic Ministry and Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Divine Word College; M.A., DePaul 
University; S.T.D., Universidad Pontificia de 
Salamanca. 

Luis Rivera-Rodriguez (MTS) Assistant Professor 
of Theology 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.Div., Evangelical 
Seminary of Puerto Rico; Th.M, Th.D., Harvard 
University Divinity School. 

Jose David Rodriguez (LSTC) Associate Professor 
of Theology and Director of Hispanic Ministries 
Program; (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of Theology. 
B.A., Universidad de Puerto Rico; M.Div., Th.M., 
Th.D., Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 

Daniel R. Rodriguez-Diaz (MTS) Professor of 
Church History and Hispanic Ministry 
B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.Div., Graduate 
School of Theology, Oberlin College; Ph.D., 
National University of Mexico. 

Theodore C. Ross, S.J. (CTU) Lecturer in Church 
History; (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Church History 
Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden 



College; MA. (History), M.A., (Theology), Loyola 
University, Chicago; S.T.L., Bellarmine School of 
Theology. 

Barbara Rossing (LSTC) Assistant Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Carleton College; M.Div., Yale Divinity 
School; Th.D. cand., Harvard Divinity School. 

Wolfgang M.W. Roth (G-ETS) Frederick Carl Eiselen 
Professor of Old Testament Interpretation 
cand. rev. min., Universities of Marburg, Tubingen, 
Heidelberg; Th.M., Th.D., Victoria University/ 
Toronto School of Theology. 

D. Nicholas Rudall (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Communication Arts 

B.A., Cambridge University; Ph.D., Cornell 
University. 

Doris Rudy (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.S. Ed.., M.A., Miami University; M.Div., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

Rosemary Radford Ruether (G-ETS) Georgia 
Harkness Professor of Applied Theology 
B.A., Scripps College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School; L.H.D., Denison University; 
Emmanuel College, Boston; Wittenberg University; 
Xavier University; Hamilton College; St.. Olaf s 
College; Walsh College; Merrimack College; 
DePauw University; D.D., St. Bernard's Institute, 
University of Edinburgh. 

Jane R. Rzepka (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., University of Michigan; M.Div., Starr King 
School for the Ministry; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union. 

Kenneth Sawyer (MTS) Assistant Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., University of Nebraska; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.A.L.S., Ph.D., The 
University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Kenneth W. Sawyer (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 
B.A., Amherst College; B.D., Harvard University. 

Joan Scanlon, O.P. (CTU) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Siena College; M.A., Loyola University, 
Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern University and 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

R. Michael Schaab (CTU) Adjunct Instructor in 
Liturgy 

B.A., St. Ambrose University; S.T.L., The Catholic 
University of America; S.T.D. cand., San Anselno, 
Rome. 



119 



Herman E. Schaalmann (CTS) and (G-ETS) Adjunct 
Faculty Member 

B.A., M.A., University of Cincinnati; B.H.L., 
M.H.L., D.D., Hebrew Union College. 

James A. Scherer (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
Missions and Church History 
A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Study: Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Columbia University; 
International Christian University, Japan; Oxford 
University. 

Daniel S. Schipani (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Christian Eduction; (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

Lic.Psy., Universidad de Buenos Aires; Dr.Psy., 
Universidad Catolica Argentina; MAR., Goshen 
Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Study: University of California at Los 
Angeles. 

Robert L. Schoenstene (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Sacred Scripture 
B.A., St. Francis DeSales College; M.A., Loyola 
University, Chicago; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical 
Institute, Rome. 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.Pp.S. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Dr., University of 
Nijmegen: Study: Oxford University. 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Religion and Society 

B.A., Bethel College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

Roger Schroeder, S.V.D. (CTU) Adjunct Assistant 
Professor of Cross Cultural Ministry 
L.Miss., D.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian University. 

Marillyn Schultz Rothermel (LSTC) Dean of the 
Community 

B.A., North Park College;; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Michael C. Schultz Rothermel (LSTC) Dean of the 
Community 

B. A., North Park College; M.Div., Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Timothy F. Sedgwick (S-WTS) Professor of Ethics 
and Moral Theology 

A.B., Albion College; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt 
University. 



Charles M. Sell (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B. A., University of Pittsburgh; Th.M., Th.D., Dallas 
Theological Seminary. 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) Professor of New 
Testament Studies 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Mark H. Senter, HI (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Education: Dean of Extension and 
Continuing Education 

Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., University of 
Illinois Circle Campus; M.A., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago. 

Jack L. Seymour (G-ETS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Director, Joint Ph.D. Program (with 
Northwestern University) 
B.S., Ball State University; M.Div., D.Min., 
Vanderbilt University Divinity School; Ph.D., 
George Peabody College. 

NeilH. Shadle (M/L) Associate Professor of Ministry 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan Univesity; B.D., Meadville/ 
Lombard Theological School; D.Min., Pacific 
School of Religion. 

Douglas R. Sharp (NBTS) Professor of Christian 
Theology; Vice Presidentfor Academic Affairs and 
Dean of the Seminary 

B.A., William Jewell College; M.Div., American 
Baptist Seminary of the West; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union. 

MarkS.Sisk (S-WTS) Dean and President 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.Div., D.D., The 
General Theological Seminary. 

Daniel S. Siwek (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Ministry 
M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Newland F. Smith, 3rd (S-WTS) Librarian for 
Collection Management, The United Library, G- 
ETS/S-WTS; Secretary to the Faculty, Associate 
Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate Library 
School, The University of Chicago; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary. 

Ozzie E. Smith, Jr. (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching 

B.A., Langston University; M.Ed., Memphis State 
University; M.Div., McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 



120 



Kenneth B. Smith, Sr. (CTS) President and Associate 
Professor of Ministry 

B.A., Virginia Union University; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; D.D.., Elmhurst College; 
DPS., National College of Education. 

Klyne R. Snodgrass (NPTS) Paul W. Brandel Chair 

in New Testament Studies 
B.A., Columbia Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University of 
St. Andrews, Scotland. 

Graydon F. Snyder (CTS) Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Study: Pontifical Institute of Christian 
Archaeology, Rome; Cambridge University. 

Mark Sorvillo (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department of Church History 
B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.Div., S.T.L., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; Ph.D., The 
University of Chicago. 

James A. Speer (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology, Church and Society 
B.A., Biola College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; M.Phil., Ph.D., Drew University 
Graduate School. 

Miriam J. Stark (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.A., The Kings College; M.A., Liberty University; 
M.A., Biola University; Ph.D., Rosemead Graduate 
School. 

William Richard Stegner (G-ETS) Senior Scholar 
in New Testament; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor in 
New Testament 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Drew 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University. 

K. James Stein (G-ETS) Jubilee Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Westmar College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Westmar College. 

William Strehlow (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in Church 
and Society 

B.A., San Francisco State University; M.Div., Pacific 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; D.Min. cand., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Norma S. Sutton (NPTS) Seminary Librarian and 
Associate Professor of Theological Bibliography 
B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated 
Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., University of 



Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory University. 

Sarah J. Tanzer (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Judaism and Christian Origins 
A.B., Dickinson College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Harvard University; Study: Hebrew 
University; Oxford University. 

Susan B. Thistlethwaite (CTS) Professor of Theology 
and Culture and Director, Center for Theology, 
Ethics and the Human Sciences 
B.A., Smith College; M.Div., Duke Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Duke University. 

Richard D. Tholin (G-ETS) Senior Scholar in 
Christian Social Ethics 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary. 

Frank Thomas (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana; 
M.A., Northeastern Illinois University; M.Div., 
D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Sharon G. Thornton (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Pastoral Care and Theology 
B.A., University of Washington; M.Div., Pacific 
School of Religion; Ph.D. cand., Graduate 
Theological Union. 

John Tolley (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., University of Indianapolis; M.M., Christian 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., New York University. 

Barbara B. Troxell (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Practical Theology, Director of Field Education 
and Spiritual Formation 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary; Study: Graduate Theological 
Union; Pacific School of Religion; University of 
Edinburgh. 

Ruth A. Tucker (TEDS) Visiting Professor of Mission 
B.A., LeTourneau College; M.A., Baylor University; 
Ph.D., Northern Illinois University. 

Robert G. Turtle (G-ETS) E. Stanley Jones Professor 
of Evangelism 

A.B., Duke University; B.D., Garrett Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Wheaton Graduate School of 
Theology; Ph.D., University of Bristol. 

Robert Tuzik (MS) Instructor, Adjunct Faculty, 
Department ofSystematics 
A.B., Loyola University; M.Div., S.T.L., University 
of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame. 



121 



Larry Ulrich (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Manchester College, Indiana; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; M.T.S., University of 
Dubuque Theological Seminary; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Willem Arie VanGemeren (TEDS) Professor of Old 
Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., University of Illinois, Chicago; B.D., 
Westminster Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin. 

Kenneth L. Vaux (G-ETS) Professor of Theological 
Ethics 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Th., University of 
Hamburg. 

Sara Vaux (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Allegheny College; Ph.D., Rice University. 

Osvaldo D. Vena (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of New 
Testament Interpretation and Director of the 
Center for Hispanic Ministries 
B.Th., Buenos Aires Bible Institute; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Instituto Superior 
Evangel ico de Estudios Teologicos. 

Dwight W. Vogel (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Ministry 

B.A., Westmar College; A.M., Boston University; 
B.D., Andover Newton Theological School; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Linda J. Vogel (G-ETS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B.S., Boston University; M.R.E., Andover Newton 
Theological School; Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Harold Vogelaar (LSTC) Visiting Professor of World 
Religions 

B.A., Central College; B.D., New Brunswick 
Theological Seminary; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia 
University. 

Paul H. Wachdorf (MS) Associate Deam of 
Formation and Director of Prayer Formation 
B.S., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.C.Sp., 
Creighton University, Omaha. 

PaulWadell,C.P. (CTU) Professor of Ethics 

B.A., Bellarmine College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; Ph.D., University of Notre 
Dame. 

James M. Wall (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., B.D., Emory University; M.A., The University 



of Chicago; Litt.D., Ohio Northern University; 
DHL., Willamette College, Coe College; D.D., 
MacMurray College. 

Andrew Wallace (LSTC) Instructor in Theology 
B.A., M.A., University of New Mexico; M.Div., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., The 
University of Chicago. 

Richard Walsh (CTU) Adjunct Lecturer in Religious 
Education 

M.R.Ed., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
DeAndreis Institute of Theology. 

Walter Wangerin, Jr. (LSTC) Adjunct Professor of 
Theology and Literature 

B.A., Concordia Senior College, Ft. Wayne; M.A., 
Miami University; M.Div., Christ Seminary- 
Seminex. 

Ted W. Ward (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Mission, G. W. Aide en Chair of 
International Studies and Mission 
B.Mus.Ed., Wheaton College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Florida. 

Don Wardlaw (MTS) James G. K. McClure Professor 
of Preaching and Worship and Director of the 
A CTS D. Min. in Preaching Program 
B.A., Columbus University; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., University 
of Aberdeen. 

Bruce A. Ware (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Biblical and Systematic Theology 
B.A., Whitworth College; M.Div., Th.M., Western 
Conservative Baptist Seminary; M.A., University of 
Washington; Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary. 

Raymond J. Webb (MS) Chairperson and Director, 
Department of Pastoral Internships; Director, 
Newly Ordained Program; Associate Dean of 
Formation 

S.T.B., A.M., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago. 

Robert Webber (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., Bob Jones University; Th.M., Th.D., Covenant 
Theological Seminary. 

C. JohnWeborg (NPTS) Professor of Theology 
A.B., University of Nebraska; B.D., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett Evangelical 
Seminary and Northwestern University. 

Herold D. Weiss (NBTS) Affiliate Professor oj 'New, 
Testament 
B.A., Southern Mississippi College; M.A., B.D., 



122 



Andrews University; Ph.D., Duke University; Study: 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Pontifical 
Biblical Institute. 

Wayne C. Weld (NPTS) Professor of Missions 
A.B., University of Washington; B.D., M.A., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; Study: North 
Park Theological Seminary. 

MonaWest (CTS) Adjunct Faculty 

B.A., Louisiana College; M.Div., Ph.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Vitor Westhelle (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Systematic Theology 

B.Th., Faculdade de Teologia da IECLB, Sao 
Leopoldo, Brazil; Th.M., Th.D., Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago. 

James E. Will (G-ETS) Henry Pfeiffer Professor of 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia University 
and Union Theological Seminary. 

Douglas E.Wingeier (G-ETS) Professor of Practical 
Theology 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

Bartholomew S. Winters (MS) Associate Dean of 
Formation 

M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
Ph.D.cand., Gregorian University. 

Richard J. Wojcik (MS) Professor Emeritus, 
Department of Liturgy and Sacraments 
M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.C.G., Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music, Rome. 

John D. Woodbridge (TEDS) Professor of Church 
History and the History of Christian Thought 
A.B., Wheaton College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; Ph.D., University of Toulouse. 

Charles David Wysong (NPTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Christian Education 

B.A., Cal State Fullerton; M.Div., Fuller Theological 
Seminary. 

Henry James Young (G-ETS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

B.A., Tougaloo College; Th.M., Boston University 
School of Theology; Ph.D., Hartford Seminary 
Foundation. 

Warren Cameron Young (NBTS) Distinguished 



Professor of Christian Philosophy and Theology, 

Emeritus 

A.B., Gordon College; B.D., Northern Baptist 

Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 

University; Study: University of Heidelberg; 

University of Basel. 

Dennis Zalecki (MS) Associate Dean of Formation 
B.A., Niles College of Loyola University; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., 
Middlebury College. 

Martin A. Zielinski (MS) Academic Dean and 
Associate Professor, Department of Church History 
B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., Ph.D., 
The Catholic University of America. 

LIBRARIANS 

Henry Baldwin, F.S.C. (MS) Librarian 

M.Ed., St. Mary's College, Winona; M.L.S., George 
Peabody College; M.A., Immaculate Conception 
Seminary, Mahway, NJ. 

William Beermann (JKM) Cataloger 

B.Mus., Valparaiso University; M. Music, Yale 
University; MA. in L.S., Rosary College. 

Mary R. Bischoff (LSTC/MTS) Director oftheJesuit- 
Krauss-McCormick Library; (MTS) Educational 
Administrator, (LSTC) Faculty Status 
B.A., University of Missouri; M.S. in L.S., 
University of Illinois; Study: Christ Seminary- 
Seminex; St. Louis University. 

Joan Blocher (CTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Sonia E. Bodi (NPTS) Head of Reference and 
Interlibrary Loan and Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Augustana College; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; MA, Northwestern University. 

Ann Briody (NPTS) Circulation Librarian 

B.A., Marquette University; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College Graduate School of Library and Information 
Science. 

Alva R. Caldwell (G-ETS) Librarian for Program 
and Planning, The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
and Associate Professor of Ministries 
B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; 
D.Min., Mundelein Seminary of the University of 
St. Mary of the Lake. 



123 



Deborah J. Cocanig (CTU) Cataloger 

B.A., Roosevelt University; M.A., University of 
Iowa. 

Neil W. Gerdes (CTS) and (M/L) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; M.A.L.S., 
The University of Chicago; D.Min., University of 
St. Mary of the Lake. 

Dorothy-Ellen Gross (NPTS) Director of 
Consolidated Libraries, Associate Dean for 
Academic Support and Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Westminster College; M.Div., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary College 
Graduate School of Library and Information 
Science. 

Loren Hagen (G-ETS/S-WTS) Catalog Librarian, 
The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., M.Libr., University of 
Washington. 

David K. Himrod (G-ETS/S-WTS) Assistant 
Librarian for Reader Services, The United Library, 
G-ETS/S-WTS 

B.S., California Institute of Technology; M.Th., 
School of Theology atClaremont; Ph.D., University 
of California, Los Angeles. 

Tina B. Krause (JKM) Coordinator of the Ecumenical 
Parish Resource Center 
B.A., California Lutheran College. 

Robert A. Krupp (TEDS) Librarian 

B.A., Franklin and Marshall College; M.Div., 
Western Seminary; M.A., The University of 
Portland; A.M.L.S., The University of Michigan; 
Ph.D., California Graduate School of Theology. 

Helen Kenik Mainelli (NBTS) Professor of 
Theological Bibliography and Director of the 
Seminary Library 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S., Barry University; 
MLIS, University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., St. 
Louis University. 

M. Colleen McHale O'Connor (NPTS) Cataloging 
and Systems Librarian 

B.A., Middlebury College; M.Div., Episcopal 
Divinity School; M.L.S., State University ofNew 
York at Albany. 

Kenneth 0'Malley,C.P. (CTU) Director of Library 
and Professor of Bibliography 
A.M.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois; Study: University of Detroit; Loyola 



University, Chicago; Saint Louis University; 
Spalding College. 

EmilieG. Pulver (JKM) Head of Technical Services 
B.A., Case Western Reserve University; M.L.S., The 
University of Chicago. 

Janet Russell (JKM) Reference Librarian 

B.A., Reed College; M.A. in Teaching, M.A. in 
Library Science, The University of Chicago. 

Kenneth Sawyer (JKM) Head of Public Services 
B.A., University ofNebraska, Lincoln; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.A.L.S., The 
University of Chicago Graduate Library School; 
Ph.D., The University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Newland F. Smith, 3rd (S-WTS) Librarian for 
Collection Management, The United Library, G- 
ETS/S-WTS; Secretary to the Faculty, Associate 
Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate Library 
School, The University of Chicago; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary. 

Michael L. Stone (CTU) Librarian 

A.B., Harvard College; LL.B., Harvard Law School; 
LL.M., Boston University Law School; M.A.L.S., 
Rosary College. 

Carol Stukey (JKM) Serials Librarian 

B.A., Yale University; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

Norma S. Sutton (NPTS) Seminary Librarian and 
Associate Professor of Theological Bibliography 
B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated 
Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., University of 
Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory University. 

John W. Thompson (G-ETS/S-WTS) Head of 
Technical Services, The United Library, G-ETS/S- 
WTS 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., The University of 
Chicago; M.A., Graduate Library School, The 
University of Chicago. 

Keith P. Wells (TEDS) Reference Librarian 

B.A., Westminster College; M.Div., Th.M., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.L.S., University of 
Pittsburgh. 



124 



APPENDIX 

EVENING / WEEKEND AND INTENSIVE COURSES 

Because of the scheduling needs of many students, this appendix lists courses in two 
categories. The first is an index of courses that meet either in the evenings or on weekends. 
The second is an index of courses that meet for only part of the regular term; this includes 
some weekend courses; all of these courses have intensive, extended class meetings for the 
days scheduled for the course, including in most cases, weekday meeting times. p 

Courses are listed according to their sections in the classification system in the Course 
Descriptions, beginning on page 37. For convenience in utilizing these indices, that outline is 
given below with page references for the beginning of each subdivision and the abbreviations 
as used in the following table. 

Biblical Studies General 
Old Testament (OT) 
I. Introductory 
II. Canonical Corpus 

III. Select Topics 

IV. Hebrew Language 
New Testament (NT) 

I. Introductory 
II. Books of the New Testament 

III. Select Topics 

IV. New Testament Greek 
Historical Studies (HS) 

I. Introductory 
II. History of Particular Traditions 

III. History — Individuals 

IV. American Church History 

V. Select Topics 
Theological Studies (TS) 

I. Introductory and Foundational 
II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 
III. Select Topics 
Ethical Studies (ES) 

I. Moral Theology 
II. Select Topics 
Religion and Society Studies 
World Mission Studies 
History of Religions 
Ministry Studies (MS) 

I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 
II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

III. Pastoral Care 

IV. Liturgy and Worship Studies 
V. Preaching and Communication 

VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 
VII. Polity and Canon Law 

125 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


37 


59 


80 


37 


59 


80 


38 


59 


80 


38 


60 


81 


39 


60 


82 


39 


61 


82 


40 


61 


82 


41 


62 


83 


41 


63 


84 


42 


63 


85 


43 


64 


85 


43 


65 


85 


44 


65 


85 


44 


65 


86 


44 


65 


86 


45 


66 


87 


46 


67 


87 


48 


69 


89 


48 


69 


90 


49 


71 


91 


50 


71 


91 


51 


72 


92 


51 


73 


92 


52 


74 


93 


54 


75 


94 


55 


77 


95 


56 


77 


96 


57 


78 


98 


58 


79 


99 



EVENING/WEEKEND 
COURSES 

FALL 

Biblical Studies General 

LSTC B-333 
OT I. Introductory 

LSTC B-310 

NBTS OT301 
OTII. Canonical Corpus 

NBTS OT416 
NT I. Introductory 

CTU B305f 
NTH. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B 452 
HSI. Introductory 

G-ETS 13-503f 

LSTC H-310 

MTS H-300f 
HS II. History of Particular Traditions 

LSTC H-459H 

MTS H-416K 
TS II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

G-ETS 21-644 

LSTC T-529 

NBTS TH435 
TS III. Select Topics in Theology 

CTU D430 

CTU DC442 

G-ETS 21-636 

MTS T-404 

NBTS THMN405 

NCTI Seminar I 

S-WTS 05-630S 
ES I. Moral Theology 

CTS TEC 321 

G-ETS 21/22-503f 

G-ETS 22-506 
World Mission Studies 

CTU C 575f 

CTU/MTS C 460f 

LSTC W-312 

NPTS MNST-150 
MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

G-ETS 40-675 
MS II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

CTU S 540 

NPTS MNST-106 
MS III. Pastoral Care 

CTS CM 463 

G-ETS 32-50 If 

G-ETS 32-614 
MSV. Preaching and Communication 

G-ETS 31-605 

G-ETS 35-631 



MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-506 
G-ETS 33-611 
LSTC M-360 
NBTS ED302H 
NPTS MNST-240 
MS VII. Polity and Canon Law 
CTU MW421f 



WINTER 

OTI. Introductory 

NPTS BIBL-147 
OT II. Canonical Corpus 

LSTC B-532 

NBTS OT302 

NBTS OT304H 
NTH. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B430 

MTS B-446 

NBTS NT 411 
NT HI. Select Topics in New Testament 

LSTC B-473/G-ETS 12-617 
NT IV. New Testament Greek 

MTS B-324H 
HS I. Introductory 

CTU H300 
HS II. History of Particular Traditions 

LSTC H-485H 

MTS H-330 
HS V. Select Topics in Church History 

LSTC H-460 
TS I. Introductory and Foundational 

G-ETS 21-501w 

MTS T-300 . 

NBTS IN 311 
TS II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

CTU CD465H 

LSTC T-436/NPTSTHEO-174 

LSTC T-602 

NBTS TH432 
TSUI. Select Topics in Theology 

G-ETS 21-605 

LSTC T-456 

LSTC T-603 
ESI. Moral Theology 

CTU E 370w 
ES II. Select Topics in Ethics 

CTU E432 

CTU E470 

CTU EC545 

LSTC E-432/MTS E-424 

NPTS THEO-172 
Religion and Society Studies 

CTS TEC 433 

LSTC M-370w 



126 



World Mission Studies 

CTU C 575w 

CTU/MTS C 460w 

NPTS MNST-151 
History of Religions 

LSTC W-429 
MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

CTS CM 300 

G-ETS 34-610 

MTS M-315K 

MTS M-437 

SCUPE M 305 
MS II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

CTU S414 
MS III. Pastoral Care 

CTU MP408 

G-ETS 32-50 lw 

G-ETS 32-617 

G-ETS 32-634 

LSTC M-440 

NPTS MNST-125 
MS IV. Liturgy and Worship Studies 

LSTC M-380 
MSV. Preaching and Communication 

G-ETS 31-501w 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-635 

MTS M-412 



SPRING 

Biblical Studies General 

MTS B-300s 
OTI. Introductory 

CTU B 300s 

LSTC B-313 
OT II. Canonical Corpus 

NBTS OT453 
OT III. Select Topics in Old Testament 

CTS CH450 
NT I. Introductory 

G-ETS 12-502 
NTH. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B435 

NBTS NT404H 
NT III. Select Topics in New Testament 

LSTC B-555/MTS B-509 
NT IV. New Testament Greek 

MTS B-325H 
HS I. Introductory 

G-ETS 13-502s 
HS II. History of Particular Traditions 

CTS CH367 

MTS H-421 
HS V. Select Topics in Church History 

LSTC T-546 



TSI. Introductory and Foundational 

G-ETS 21 -500s 

G-ETS 21 -502s 
TS II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

CTU D520 

G-ETS 21-634 

G-ETS 21-642 

NBTS TH511 
TS HI. Select Topics in Theology 

CTS TEC 481 

CTU D561 

CTU DC436 

LSTC T-430 

LSTC T-512 

LSTC T-544 

LSTC T-604 

LSTC T-672 

MTS T-439 
ESH. Select Topics in Ethics 

CTU E481 

G-ETS 22-623 

NBTS TE410 
World Mission Studies 

CTU C 505/LSTC VV-425 
MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

LSTC M-451H 

MTS M-378 
MS II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

NCTI Seminar II 
MS III. Pastoral Care 

G-ETS 32-633 

LSTC M-320 
MS IV. Liturgy and Worship Studies 

CTU CW351 

CTU W455s 

G-ETS 31-51 Is 

NBTS MN380H 
MSV. Preaching and Communication 

CTU MW452 

G-ETS 35-630 

G-ETS 35/22-637 

LSTC M-458 

MTS M-447 

NBTS MN 383 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-610 

G-ETS 33/22-642 

LSTC M-460 



INTENSIVE COURSES 



FALL 

OTIV. Hebrew Language 

LSTC B-300A 
MTS B-321 



127 



NTH. Books of the New Testament 

MTS B-401K 

MTS B-402K 
NT III. Select Topics in New Testament 

MTS B-487K 
NT IV. New Testament Greek 

LSTC B-307 
TS I. Introductory and Foundational 

LSTC T-301 
Religion and Society Studies 

SCUPE S-H301 
MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

SCUPE M301 
MS IV. Liturgy and Worship Studies 

CTU W455f 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

LSTC M-360 

MTS M-335K 

NPTS MNST-240 
MS VII. Polity and Canon Law 

MTS M-307f 

WINTER 

OT II. Canonical Corpus 

CTS CH403 
OT IV. Hebrew Language 

G-ETS 11-641 

G-ETS 11-642 
NT III. Select Topics in New Testament 

G-ETS 12-606 

LSTC B-473/G-ETS 12-617 
NT IV. New Testament Greek 

G-ETS 12-642 

S-WTS 02-523GS 
HSI. Introductory 

G-ETS 13-502w 
HSIII. History — Individuals 

NPTS HSTX-135 
HS IV. American Church History 

G-ETS 13-672 
HS V. Select Topics in Church History 

LSTC H-460 
TS I. Introductory and Foundational 

G-ETS 21-502w 
TS II. Particular Individuals or Traditions 

M/L TS322w 

M/L TS336w 

MTS T-441K 
TSUI. Select Topics in Theology 

G-ETS 21-605 

G-ETS 21-638 

S-WTS 16-502S 
ES I. Moral Theology 

G-ETS 22-502 



ES II. Select Topics in Ethics 

CTU E470 

G-ETS 22-643 

S-WTS 08-603S 
Religion and Society Studies 

G-ETS 22-504 

SCUPE M 300 

TEDS ME845 
MS I. The Nature and Practice of Ministry 

G-ETS 34-506 

G-ETS 34-610 

G-ETS 34-676 

M/L M360w 

M/L M413w 

MTS M-437 

NPTS MNST-161 
MS II. Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 

G-ETS 13-615 

NBTS MN405 

S-WTS 06-50 IS 
MS III. Pastoral Care 

G-ETS 32-617 

G-ETS 32-634 

MTS M-348K 
MS IV. Liturgy and Worship Studies 

G-ETS 31-512 

G-ETS 31-515 
MSV. Preaching and Communication 

G-ETS 31-501w 

M/L M412w 
MS VI. Educational Ministry of the Church 

G-ETS 33-616 

G-ETS 33-635 

M/L M400w 

SPRING 

NTH. Books of the New Testament 

CTU B 435 
TSUI. Select Topics in Theology 

SCUPE M 304 
Religion and Society Studies 

SCUPE M 302 
MSV. Preaching and Communication 

CTU MW452 

G-ETS 35-630 



128 



129 



130 



131 



LOCATIONS OF ACTS SCHOOLS 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS TO GET TO EACH AREA OF THE MAP: 

1. To MS: Mundelein Seminary is located in Mundelein, forty miles northwest of 
downtown Chicago, and may be reached by car via the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to 
the Route 1 76 exit, 1 76 west to Mundelein. The Seminary is located on the campus to the 
University of St. Mary of the Lake on the north side of 176. 

2. To TEDS: Trinity is located in the northwest suburb of Deerfield and may be 
reached by car via the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to the Route 22 exit. The Seminary is 
immediately to the east of the expressway off Route 22. 

3. To G-ETS and S-WTS: Garrett-Evangelical and Seabury- Western are located 
respectively on the east and west sides of Sheridan Road on the Northwestern University 
campus in Evanston. They may be reached either by car via the Lake Shore Drive (North) 
to Sheridan Road or by public transportation with the CTA elevated train to the Noyes 
Street station. 

4. To NPTS: North Park is located on the far north side of Chicago and may be 
reached by car via the Chicago metropolitan expressway system either from Lake Shore 
Drive (North) or the Kennedy Expressway (1-90/94) or by public transportation taking 
either the CTA elevated Howard train to the Berwyn Street station and connecting bus or 
the Ravenswood line to the Kimball Street station. 

5. To NETS: Northern is located in west suburban Lombard and may be reached by 
car via the East- West Tollway (1-88) west to the Highland Avenue exit, Highland Avenue 
north to Butterfield Road (Route 56), Butterfield Road east. The Seminary is located just 
east of the Yorktown Shopping Center. 

6. To CTU, CTS, LSTC, M/L and MTS: All five schools are located in close prox- 
imity to one another in the Hyde Park area of Chicago near the University of Chicago. 
They may be reached by car via the Chicago metropolitan expressway system either from 
the Lake Shore Drive (South) or the Dan Ryan Expressway (1-90/94), and by public trans- 
portation with either the CTA elevated train or the IC (Illinois Central) to the respective 
55th Street stations and connecting buses. 



132 



Ell 



2 3 4 MILES 



Legend: 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

G-ETS Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

M/L Meadville Lombard Theological School 

MS Mundelein Seminary 

NPTS North Park Theological Seminary 

NBTS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

S-WTS Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 







S~ 



2. 



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